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CALPADS Update FLASH #116

OPENING OF 2015–16 END-OF-YEAR SUBMISSION WINDOW

The 2015–16 End-of-Year (EOY) submission window opens May 23, 2016. Local educational agencies (LEAs) are expected to certify all applicable EOY submissions this year.

LEAs are strongly encouraged to start on the EOY submissions immediately and not wait until school is out to begin file uploads to CALPADS. All the EOY submissions use a reporting period of July 1, 2015 to June 30, 2016. It is to an LEA's advantage to begin the upload process now, prior to school ending, because doing so can provide reports to help LEAs resolve data problems before staff leave for the summer. Once school ends, LEAs will need to re-upload the files, but the reconciliation process should be much faster because the majority of issues would have already been resolved.

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SBAC Smart Tip #3 - Teacher Info Packets

To help teachers administer the Smarter Balanced CAASPP tests we made each teacher an info packet.  Inside each packet we put a one-page summary of the steps they needed to take to become familiar with the test, learn how to administer it online, and provide the necessary signs and student ID cards.  Basically we tried to make it as simple as possible.

We included a one-page "quick check" since we knew they probably wouldn't read the whole 50 page manual :).  We also printed out a "login ticket" for each student with their first name, SSID#, and class schedule (helpful when conducting make-ups).  We included a class roster, signs, and other helpful items.

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Illuminate Education acquires Red Schoolhouse Software

Irvine based Illuminate Education, Inc. a leading educational software company that offers SIS, Assessment, and IEP software, announced recently that they have acquired Red Schoolhouse Software, maker of the OARS Online Reporting Assessment System.  This is big news for the 80 plus districts that use the OARS platform as it was also announced that they will ask districts to migrate from OARS to Illuminate over the course of the next 12 months.  

For those of us who know the incredible people at Red SchoolHouse Software (Axel, Katy, Veronica, Shea, and the whole crew!) this is bittersweet news.  I've used the OARS product for years and think aspects of it are extremely innovative.  And their team has been the most outstanding support crew around. So on one hand I'm happy they have found a great home with the Illuminate team, but on the other hand, a little nervous about the transition process we'll have to undertake in order to make a successful switch to Illuminate.

I think this extends the "reach" of Illuminate's assessment system to over 400 California school districts.  Making it by far the largest player in the K-12 assessment system space in California.  It will be interesting to see if this move puts any pressure on districts to move away from PowerSchool and/or Aeries to adopt Illuminate's combined SIS/Assessment/IEP platform.  

The team at Illuminate is incredible too.  They've grown to over 130 employees and are expanding rapidly outside of California.  I'm very much enjoying Dr. Jenny Rankin's new book on using student data, "Designing Data Reports that Work".

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Learn Google Forms by Brent Coley

Google Forms Made Easy!
I just attended Brent Coley's presentation at the LEAD 3.0 Symposium.  Fantastic presentation on how to use Google docs in meaningful ways in your school.  Discussed forms, 3rd party extensions like Easy Query, and something very cool called Autocrat.  Check out his website here:  www.brentcoley.com.   Amazing pre-made collection of google forms and docs that are K-12 school-centric, such as a weekly PLC agenda maker, an annual Williams Law survey, the entire policy manual for his school, etc.  Great presenter with very helpful and well thought out resources that he made available via a google drive link.  Thanks Brent!
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LCAP Redesign Survey

Not 100% happy with the LCAP template?  

Good!  That makes you a human being. :)

Want to improve it?  That's even better.  

That makes you a professional educator !


You can add your 2 cents by completing the CDE Foundation's survey: 

http://cdefoundation.org/lcap-survey/

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Test Results - Parent Video - Riverside Unified School District

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CALPADS News Flash!!! HOT!

FALL 1 CALPADS AMENDMENT WINDOW DEADLINE EXTENDED!Due to the delay in the availability of the preview of Fall 1 data, which includes the Unduplicated Pupil Count (UPC) that will be used in 2015–16 Second Principal Apportionment (P-2), the California Department of Education (CDE) has extended the Fall 1 deadline to March 18, 2016. The Fall 2 deadlines remain the same. The deadlines are summarized below: ​Submission ​ ​Original Deadline ​New Deadline ​Fall 1 ​Last Day of Amendment Window ​February 19, 2016 ​March 18, 2016 ​Fall 2​CertificationDeadline​March 4, 2016​No Change​Fall 2​Last Day of Amendm...
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Why Understanding These Four Types of Mistakes Can Help Us Learn

by Eduardo Briceño

This article was first published in the Mindset Works newsletter.

We can deepen our own and our students’ understanding of mistakes, which are not all created equal, and are not always desirable. After all, our ability to manage and learn from mistakes is not fixed. We can improve it.

Here are two quotes about mistakes that I like and use, but that can also lead to confusion if we don’t further clarify what we mean:

“A life spent making mistakes is not only most honorable but more useful than a life spent doing nothing” – George Bernard Shaw

“It is well to cultivate a friendly feeling towards error, to treat it as a companion inseparable from our lives, as something having a purpose which it truly has.” – Maria Montessori

These constructive quotes communicate that mistakes are desirable, which is a positive message and part of what we want students to learn. An appreciation of mistakes helps us overcome our fear of making them, enabling us to take risks. But we also want students to understand what kinds of mistakes are most useful and how to most learn from them.

Types of mistakes

The stretch mistakes

Stretch mistakes happen when we’re working to expand our current abilities. We’re not trying to make these mistakes in that we’re not trying to do something incorrectly, but instead, we’re trying to do something that is beyond what we already can do without help, so we’re bound to make some errors.

Stretch mistakes are positive. If we never made stretch mistakes, it would mean that we never truly challenged ourselves to learn new knowledge or skills.

Sometimes when we’re stuck making and repeating the same stretch mistake, the issue may be that we’re mindlessly going through the motions, rather than truly focusing on improving our abilities. Other times the root cause may be that our approach to learning is ineffective and we should try a different strategy to learn that new skill. Or it may be that what we’re trying is too far beyond what we already know, and we’re not yet ready to master that level of challenge. It is not a problem to test our boundaries and rate of growth, exploring how far and quickly we can progress. But if we feel stuck, one thing we can do is adjust the task, decreasing the level of challenge but still keeping it beyond what we already know. Our zone of proximal development (ZPD) is the zone slightly beyond what we already can do without help, which is a fruitful level of challenge for learning.

We want to make stretch mistakes! We want to do so not by trying to do things incorrectly, but by trying to do things that are challenging. When we make stretch mistakes we want to reflect, identify what we can learn, and then adjust our approach to practice, until we master the new level of ability. Then we want to identify a new area of challenge and continue stretching ourselves.

The aha-moment mistakes

Another positive type of mistake, but one that is harder to strive or plan for, is the aha-moment mistake. This happens when we achieve what we intend to do, but then realize that it was a mistake to do so because of some knowledge we lacked which is now becoming apparent. There are lots of examples of this, such as:

When we lack the content knowledge: e.g. not finding water, we try to extinguish a fire with alcohol, which we didn’t realize is flammable. When we find there is more nuance than we realized: e.g. in our painting, we color a sun near the horizon as yellow, and later notice that the sun does not always look yellow. When we make incorrect assumptions: e.g. we try to help someone else, thinking that help is always welcome, but we find out that the person did not want help at that moment. When we make systematic mistakes: e.g. a fellow educator observes us doing a lesson and later points out, with compelling back-up data, that we tend to call on Caucasian girls much more often than we do other students. When we misremember: e.g. we call a friend for their birthday on the right date, but the wrong month.

We can gain more aha moments from mistakes by being reflective. We can ask ourselves What was unexpected? Why did that result occur? What went well and what didn’t? Is there anything I could try differently next time? We can also ask people around us for information we may not be aware of, or for ideas for improvement.

Four

The sloppy mistakes

Sloppy mistakes happen when we’re doing something we already know how to do, but we do it incorrectly because we lose concentration. We all make sloppy mistakes occasionally because we’re human. However, when we make too many of these mistakes, especially on a task that we intend to focus on at the time, it signals an opportunity to enhance our focus, processes, environment, or habits.

Sometimes sloppy mistakes can be turned into aha moments. If we make a mistake because we’re not focused on the task at hand, or we’re too tired, or something distracted us, upon reflection we can gain aha-moments on how to improve, such as realizing we’re better at certain tasks after a good night’s sleep, or that if we silence our gadgets or close our doors we can focus better.

The high-stakes mistakes

Sometimes we don’t want to make a mistake because it would be catastrophic. For example, in potentially dangerous situations we want to be safe. A big mistake from the person in charge of security in a nuclear power plant could lead to a nuclear disaster. We don’t want a school bus driver to take a risk going too fast making a turn, or a student in that bus to blindfold the bus driver. In those cases, we want to put processes in place to minimize high-stakes mistakes. We also want to be clear with students about why we don’t want the risk-taking behavior and experimentation in these situations, and how they’re different from learning-oriented tasks.

Aside from life-threatening situations, we can sometimes consider performance situations to be high-stakes. For example, if going to a prestigious college is important to someone, taking the SAT could be a high-stakes event because the performance in that assessment has important ramifications. Or if a sports team has trained for years, working very hard to maximize growth, a championship final can be considered a high-stakes event. It is okay to see these events as performance events rather than as learning events, and to seek to minimize mistakes and maximize performance in these events. We’re putting our best foot forward, trying to perform as best as we can. How we do in these events gives us information about how effective we have become through our hard work and effort. Of course, it is also ok to embed learning activities in high-stakes events that don’t involve safety concerns. We can try something that is beyond what we already know and see how it works, as long as we realize that it may impact our performance (positively or negatively). And of course, we can always learn from these performance events by afterwards reflecting and discussing how things went, what we could do differently next time, and how we could adjust our practice.

In a high-stakes event, if we don’t achieve our goal of a high test score or winning the championship, let’s reflect on the progress we’ve made through time, on the approaches that have and haven’t helped us grow, and on what we can do to grow more effectively. Then let’s go back to spending most of our time practicing, challenging ourselves, and seeking stretch mistakes and learning from those mistakes. On the other hand, if we achieve our target score or win a championship, that’s great. Let’s celebrate the achievement and how much progress we’ve made. Then let’s ask ourselves the same questions. Let’s go back to spending most of our time practicing, challenging ourselves, and growing our abilities.

We’re all fortunate to be able to enjoy growth and learning throughout life, no matter what our current level of ability is. Nobody can ever take that source of fulfillment away from us.

Let’s be clear

Mistakes are not all created equal, and they are not always desirable. In addition, learning from mistakes is not all automatic. In order to learn from them the most we need to reflect on our errors and extract lessons from them.

If we’re more precise in our own understanding of mistakes and in our communication with students, it will increase their understanding, buy-in, and efficacy as learners.

Eduardo Briceño is the Co-Founder & CEO of Mindset Works, which he created with Carol Dweck, Lisa Blackwell and others to help people develop as motivated and effective learners. Carol Dweck is still on the board of directors, but has no financial interest in or income from Mindset Works. The ideas expressed in this article, which was first published in the Mindset Works newsletter, are entirely Eduardo Briceño’s.

Original author: MindShift
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New English Language Proficiency Assessments for California (ELPAC)

The California Department of Education (CDE) has posted the new English Language Proficiency Assessments for California (ELPAC) Web site.

In preparing for the transition from the California English Language Development Test (CELDT) to the ELPAC in 2018, the ELPAC Web site has been developed and posted here to provide you with new and updated resources and information. Be sure to visit the ELPAC Web site frequently at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/tg/ep/ to get information about the status of ELPAC development and administration.

In spring 2016, the ELPAC contractor, Educational Testing Service (ETS) will launch the ELPAC.org Web site. Information will be posted about upcoming opportunities to participate in activities such as content review, bias and sensitivity review, and training.

In addition to the ELPAC Web site, a new e-mail list has been created to provide up-to-date information regarding the ELPAC. To join the ELPAC e-mail list, send a blank e-mail to . Additional information about ELPAC activities is available on the CDE ELPAC Web site.

If you have questions, please contact the English Language Proficiency Assessments Office in the Assessment Development and Administration Division by phone at 916-319-0784 or by e-mail at .

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