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CK-12 offering Educator Certification this summer

Reap the Rewards, Get CK-12 Certified!

Summer break is the time to discover more about using CK-12 to boost your students' progress. Say hello to CK-12's Certified Educator Program! Our training program is back, with more sessions and flexibility to suit your every need. So don't wait, sign up now.


BENEFITS

Improved student engagement and learning. Discover how to: use a variety of resources through Concept-Based Learning, replace textbooks with customizable FlexBooks®, help your students explore math and science concepts with interactives, assign Adaptive Practice to support students at various skill levels, and more.

Professional growth. Gain key skills, earn professional development hours and, if you complete two on demand and five live sessions with the associated tasks, become a CK-12 Certified Educator.

Flexibility and savings. This training, as with everything offered on www.ck12.org, is designed to be free and convenient—our range of live online sessions are held at multiple times and dates from July 9 to July 20.


—The CK-12 Team
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Studying for the SAT for 20 hours on Khan Academy associated with 115-point average score increase

Khan Academy announced recently that studying for the SAT for 20 hours on their free Official SAT Practice is associated with an average score gain of 115 points. That's nearly double the average score gain compared to students who don't use their free test prep.

Official SAT Practice is free for everyone and personalized for each student. Start getting ready for the SAT today! A 115-point score gain can make a real difference when applying to college. 

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403 Hits
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Edsource Podcast This Week in California Education: Episode 5, March 18, 2017

Edsource Podcast This Week in California Education: Episode 5, March 18, 2017

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713 Hits
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Teaching Vocabulary - Middle School History

Teaching social studies is often focused on new vocabulary.  Here are my ideas about how to do that.

1. Use the three D's, Define, Describe, and Draw.  I learned this from a reading teacher at the UCLA Teaching Lab in the 90"s, I believe it was Kathy Reider but am not positive,  and have been using it ever since.  Student copies definition, then writes in their own words, and finally draws a simple image of what the word is.  Classmates may help slow neighbors with the the second two d's.  We start in class and finish for homework.

2.  Use a Frayer model to teach and practice words, I call it "four corners" in my classroom.  This is a strategy based on the idea that even babies can tell what is "not" a thing... e.g. a baby tastes things they find on the floor to find out if it is food... so even a new word can fit in a category of what it isn't.  Do four things for each word, Define, List characteristics, List what it is, and finally list what it isn't.  

3.  Repetition of smaller list of words.  Instead of increasing the number of words try to limit the number.  So if you taught 20 words for a chapter, just pick the top ten and spend the extra time using the top ten in various modes, so you have more time to do both 3 D's and 4 Corner's for the words.  

4.  Save the extra word lists for the students who are feeling bored and would like to have a challenge

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720 Hits
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