Select CALPADS Code Category to review: (Version 9.4, May 20, 2018)

Valid Code Value Name Definition
FY Full Year A session that lasts the full academic year.
H1 First Hexmester The first of six hexmesters in an Academic Year.
H2 Second Hexmester The second of six hexmesters in an Academic Year.
H3 Third Hexmester The third of six hexmesters in an Academic Year.
H4 Fourth Hexmester The fourth of six hexmesters in an Academic Year.
H5 Fifth Hexmester The fifth of six hexmesters in an Academic Year.
H6 Sixth Hexmester The sixth of six hexmesters in an Academic Year.
IS Intersession An academic session that occurs during a short break during the academic year (not necessarily a longer, summer break), typical of year-round schools.
Q1 First Quarter The first of four quarters of an Academic Year.
Q2 Second Quarter The second of four quarters of an Academic Year.
Q3 Third Quarter The third of four quarters of an Academic Year.
Q4 Fourth Quarter The fourth and final quarter of an Academic Year.
S1 First Semester The first of two semesters in an Academic Year.
S2 Second Semester The Second of two semesters in an Academic Year.
SP Supplemental Session A session that occurs on evenings, after school, or weekends.
SS Summer Session An academic session that occurs during the summer break.
T1 First Trimester The first of three trimesters in an Academic Year.
T2 Second Trimester The second of three trimesters in an Academic Year.
T3 Third Trimester The third of three trimesters in an Academic Year.
Z1 Other First Term The first term in a set of terms not otherwise defined in this code set.
Z2 Other Second Term The second term in a set of terms not otherwise defined in this code set.
Z3 Other Third Term The third term in a set of terms not otherwise defined in this code set.
Z4 Other Fourth Term The fourth term in a set of terms not otherwise defined in this code set.
Z5 Other Fifth Term The fifth term in a set of terms not otherwise defined in this code set.
Z6 Other Sixth Term The sixth term in a set of terms not otherwise defined in this code set.
Z7 Other Seventh Term The seventh term in a set of terms not otherwise defined in this code set.
Z8 Other Eighth Term The eighth term in a set of terms not otherwise defined in this code set.
Z9 Other Ninth Term The ninth term in a set of terms not otherwise defined in this code set.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
Aprenda/3 Achievement Test for English Learners in their primary language (Spanish) The Aprenda/3 is an assessment that measures the academic achievement of K-12 Spanish-speaking students in their native language.
CAHSEE California High School Exit Exam The CAHSEE is an assessment that must be passed in order to receive a high school diploma.

NOTE: The CAHSEE test was retired in 2014 and no longer required.

CAPA California Alternate Performance Assessment The California Alternate Performance Assessment is given to students with significant cognitive disabilities whose disabilities prevent them from taking the California Standards Tests and the CAT/6 Survey.
CAT-6 California Achievement Test Sixth Edition The California Achievement Test Sixth Edition is the normative component of California's standardized assessment system. It is only administered to students taking the grades 3 and 7 tests. It tests Reading, Language Arts, Spelling, and Mathematics. The CAT/6 Survey allows a comparison of California students against others from across the nation, and provides a snapshot of California students referenced against a national cross section. Its content reflects national standards and its results contribute to the academic performance index.
CELDT California English Language Development Test The California English Language Development Test is a required state assessment for English language proficiency that must be given to students whose primary language is other than English.
CMA California Modified Assessment The California Modified Assessment (CMA) is a grade-level assessment for students who have an individualized education program (IEP) plan, are receiving grade-level instruction and, even with interventions, will not achieve grade-level proficiency within the year covered by the student's IEP plan. The purpose of these tests is to allow students to demonstrate achievement of the content standards in English language arts, mathematics, and science. The CMA test format is designed to provide students with disabilities greater access to an assessment of the California content standards.
CST California Standards Test The California Standards Test is an assessment measuring progress toward California's state-adopted academic content standards, which describe what students should know and be able to do in each grade and subject tested.
DRDP Desired Results Developmental Profile The Desired Results system is an accountability initiative of the California Department of Education (CDE) developed to determine the effectiveness of its child development and early childhood special education services and programs. The system is intended to ensure that children enrolled in state-funded preschool programs are benefiting from those programs. Central to the Desired Results System are the assessment instruments that measure childrens' progress. These instruments, the Desired Results Developmental Profiles (DRDP), comprise the child assessment component of the Desired Results system.
LOCEL Local English Learner Assessment A local assessment administered (as an alternative to the California English Language Development Test) to assess English language proficiency.
STS Standards-based Test in Spanish The Standards-based Tests in Spanish are multiple-choice tests that are required for Spanish-speaking English learners who receive instruction in Spanish or who have been enrolled in a U.S. school for less than 12 months.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
1 Assessment Period 1 Locally defined date.
2 Assessment Period 2 Locally defined date.
3 Assessment Period 3 Locally defined date
4 Assessment Period 4 Locally defined date.
5 Assessment Period 5 Locally defined date.
6 Assessment Period 6 Locally defined date.
7 Assessment Period 7 Locally defined date.
8 Assessment Period 8 Locally defined date.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
1 Regional Occupational Center or Program (ROC/P) The Career Technical Education course is provided by the Regional Occupational Center or Program (ROC/P).
2 District The Career Technical Education course is provided by the district.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
AGR Agriculture and Natural Resources The Agriculture and Natural Resources sector is designed to provide a foundation in agriculture for all agriculture students in California. Students engage in an instructional program that integrates academic and technical preparation and focuses on career awareness, career exploration, and skill preparation in seven pathways. The pathways emphasize real-world, occupationally relevant experiences of significant scope and depth in Agricultural Business, Agricultural Mechanics, Agriscience, Animal Science, Forestry and Natural Resources, Ornamental Horticulture, and Plant and Soil Science. Integral components of classroom and laboratory instruction, supervised agricultural experience projects, and leadership and interpersonal skills development prepare students for continued training, advanced educational opportunities, or entry to a career.
ART Arts, Media, and Entertainment Of all the career industries, the Arts, Media, and Entertainment sector requires perhaps the greatest cross-disciplinary interaction and development because the work in this sector has a propensity to be largely project-based, requiring uniquely independent work and self-management career skills. New technological developments are also constantly reshaping the boundaries and skill sets of many arts career pathways. Consequently, core arts sector occupations demand constantly varying combinations of artistic imagination, metaphoric representation, symbolic connections, and technical skills. Successful career preparation involves both in-depth and broad academic preparation as well as the cultivation of such intangible assets as flexibility, problem-solving abilities, and interpersonal skills. Careers in the Arts, Media, and Entertainment sector fall in three general pathways: Media and Design Arts, Performing Arts, and Production and Managerial Arts. The foundation and pathway standards make explicit the appropriate knowledge, skills, and practical experience students should have to pursue their chosen profession through whatever course of postsecondary, collegiate, and graduate training or apprenticeship it may require. Learning the skills and knowledge for creating, refining, and exhibiting works of art promotes teamwork, communication, creative thinking, and decision-making abilitiesùall traits needed to function successfully in the competitive and media-rich twenty-first century. Through the manipulation of sight, sound, and motion, those choosing a pathway from this sector reach out in unique ways to enhance the quality of life for those around them.
BLD Building and Construction Trades The Building Trades and Construction sector provides a foundation in the building trades and construction industry for secondary students in California. Students engage in an instructional program that integrates academic and technical preparation and focuses on career awareness, career exploration, and skill preparation in the building trades and construction industry. The sector encompasses four career pathways: Cabinetmaking and Wood Products, Engineering and Heavy Construction, Mechanical Construction, and Residential and Commercial Construction. These pathways emphasize processes, systems, and the way in which structures are built. The knowledge and skills are acquired in a sequential, standards-based pathway program that integrates hands-on, project-based, and work-based instruction as well as internship, community classroom, work experience, apprenticeship, and cooperative career technical education. Standards included in the Building Trades and Construction sector are designed to prepare students for technical training, postsecondary education, and entry to a career.
EDU Education, Child Development, and Family Services The Education, Child Development, and Family Services sector is composed of four career pathways: Child Development, Consumer Services, Education, and Family and Human Services. The high staffing needs and growing emphasis on improving education will create exciting career opportunities in those fields. The Child Development Pathway provides students with the skills and knowledge they need to pursue careers in child care and related fields, and the Education Pathway emphasizes the preparation of students to become teachers. The Consumer Services Pathway gives students the employment and management skills needed in careers helping consumers. Students pursuing careers in the Family and Human Services Pathway learn the skills they need for careers related to family and social services. The standards are designed to integrate academic and career technical concepts. The components of the pathways support classroom and laboratory instruction or provide supervised, work-based learning experiences and leadership development.
ENG Engineering and Architecture The Engineering and Design sector is designed to provide a foundation in engineering and design for students in California. Students are engaged in an instructional program that integrates academic and technical preparation and focuses on career awareness, career exploration, and career preparation in five pathways. The following pathways emphasize real-world, occupationally relevant experiences of significant scope and depth: Architectural and Structural Engineering; Computer Hardware, Electrical, and Networking Engineering; Engineering Design; Engineering Technology; and Environmental and Natural Science Engineering. To prepare students for continued training, advanced educational opportunities, and direct entry to a career, the engineering and design programs offer the following components: classroom, laboratory, and hands-on contextual learning; project- and work-based instruction; internship, community classroom, and cooperative career technical education; work experience education; and leadership and interpersonal skills development.
FIN Business and Finance Persons trained in such fields as accounting, banking, and finance will find that their skills are highly marketable. Students master basic accounting principles and procedures before proceeding to the career path specializations. The specializations emphasize concepts of accounting and finance, including computer applications, taxes, investments, and asset management. Because almost every business organization has an accounting component, students with knowledge of accounting will find that opportunities exist in many other career paths in addition to those in finance and business.
FSN Fashion and Interior Design The Fashion and Interior Design sector contains two career pathways: Fashion Design, Manufacturing, and Merchandising; and Interior Design, Furnishings, and Maintenance. To meet the growing needs of this industry, the career pathways prepare students with the knowledge, skills, and attitude necessary to pursue related careers and succeed in entry-level positions or pursue additional postsecondary education and training for technical and professional-level positions. The pathways include introductory standards for Consumer and Family Studies that lead to the other pathway standards. The standards are designed to integrate academic concepts with career technical concepts. Key components of the pathways support classroom and laboratory instruction or supervised work-based learning experiences and leadership development.
HLT Health Science and Medical Technology The standards in the Health Science and Medical Technology sector represent the academic and technical skills and knowledge students need to pursue a full range of career opportunities in this sector, from entry level to management, including technical and professional career specialties. The standards tell what workers need to know and be able to do to contribute to the delivery of safe and effective health care. The career pathways are grouped into functions that have a common purpose and require similar attributes. The career pathways are Biotechnology Research and Development, Diagnostic Services, Health Informatics, Support Services, and Therapeutic Services. Standards for each career path build on and continue the foundation standards with more complexity, rigor, and career specificity.
HOS Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreation The Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreation sector provides students with the academic and technical preparation to pursue high-demand and high-skill careers in these related and growing industries. The sector encompasses three distinct, yet interrelated, career pathways: Food Science, Dietetics, and Nutrition; Food Service and Hospitality; and Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreation. The foundation standards include core, comprehensive technical knowledge and skills that prepare students for learning in the pathways. The knowledge and skills are acquired within a sequential, standards-based pathway program that integrates hands-on and project- and work-based instruction as well as internship, community classroom, work experience, apprenticeship, and cooperative career technical education. Standards included in the Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreation sector are designed to prepare students for technical training, postsecondary education, and entry to a career.
INF Information and Communication Technologies Technology and the growing complexity of businesses have expanded the need for employees who can analyze, design, and manage information. Skills for evaluating data, the ability to work with people, and clear communication are companion components for careers in information technology systems. Employment opportunities for technically and professionally trained persons are outstanding in this emerging career path. After mastering basic technology skills, students can select one of many specializations in the field of technology.
MAN Manufacturing and Product Development The Manufacturing and Product Development sector provides a foundation in manufacturing processes and systems, including machine tool, welding, graphic communications, and graphic design, for secondary students in California. Students engage in an instructional program that integrates academic and technical preparation and focuses on career awareness, career exploration, and skill preparation in four pathways. The pathways emphasize real-world, occupationally relevant experiences of significant scope and depth in manufacturing and in graphic communication. The knowledge and skills are acquired within a sequential, standards-based pathway program that integrates hands-on, project-based, and work-based instruction as well as internship, community classroom, work experience, apprenticeship, and cooperative career technical education. Standards included in the Manufacturing and Product Development sector are designed to prepare students for technical training, postsecondary education, and entry to a career.
MAR Marketing, Sales, and Service The Marketing, Sales, and Service sector is designed to align career path course work with current and projected employment opportunities. Marketing includes the processes and techniques of transferring products or services to consumers and is a function of almost every business. It exists within an environment of rapidly changing technology, interdependent nations and economies, and increasing demands for ethical and social responsibility. The four pathways in this sector -commerce, Entrepreneurship, International Trade, and Professional Sales and Marketing emphasize training to meet the growing need for marketing professionals with skills in communication, global marketing, marketing strategies, product and service management, promotion, and selling concepts. These pathways provide a firm foundation for advanced education, entry to a career, and success in the global marketplace.
NRG Energy and Utilities The Energy and Utilities sector is designed to provide a foundation in energy and utilities for all students in California. The pathways emphasize real-world, occupationally relevant experiences of significant scope and depth in Electromechanical Installation and Maintenance, Energy and Environmental Technology, Public Utilities, and Residential and Commercial Energy and Utilities. The standards integrate academic and technical preparation and focus on career awareness, career exploration, and skill preparation in four pathways. The following components are integral to the Energy and Utilities sector pathways: classroom, laboratory, hands-on contextual learning, project and work-based instruction, internship, community classroom, cooperative career technical education, and leadership development. The Energy and Utilities sector standards prepare students for continued training, postsecondary education, or entry to a career.
PUB Public Services The Public Services sector provides a foundation for secondary students in government, public administration, public safety, legal, and human services. Students engage in an instructional program that integrates academic and technical preparation and focuses on career awareness, career exploration, and skill preparation in the industry. The sector encompasses three career pathways: Human Services, Legal and Government Services, and Protective Services. These pathways emphasize processes, systems, and services related to serving the public's interest. The knowledge and skills are acquired within a sequential, standards-based pathway program that integrates classroom, laboratory, and project- and work-based instruction as well as internship, community classroom, work experience, and cooperative career technical education. Standards included in the Public Services sector are designed to prepare students for technical training, postsecondary education, and entry to a career.
TRA Transportation The Transportation sector is designed to provide a foundation in transportation services for all industrial technology education students in California. The pathways emphasize real-world, occupationally relevant experiences of significant scope and depth in Aviation and Aerospace Transportation Services, Collision Repair and Refinishing, and Vehicle Maintenance, Service, and Repair. The standards are designed to integrate academic and technical preparation and focus on career awareness, career exploration, and skill preparation in the three pathways. Integral components include classroom, laboratory, hands-on contextual learning, and project- and work-based instruction as well as internship, community classroom, cooperative career technical education, and leadership development. The Transportation sector standards prepare students for continued training, postsecondary education, and entry to a career.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
100 Agricultural Business http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/agnatural.pdf
101 Agricultural Mechanics http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/agnatural.pdf
102 Agriscience http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/agnatural.pdf
103 Animal Science http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/agnatural.pdf
104 Forestry and Natural Resources http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/agnatural.pdf
105 Ornamental Horticulture http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/agnatural.pdf
106 Plant and Soil Science http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/agnatural.pdf
111 Design, Visual, and Media Arts http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/artsmedia.pdf
112 Performing Arts http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/artsmedia.pdf
113 Production and Managerial Arts http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/artsmedia.pdf
114 Game Design and Integration http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/artsmedia.pdf
120 Cabinetmaking, Millwork, and Woodworking http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/buildingconstruct.pdf
121 Engineering and Heavy Construction http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/buildingconstruct.pdf
122 Mechanical Systems Installation and Repair http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/buildingconstruct.pdf
123 Residential and Commercial Construction http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/buildingconstruct.pdf
130 Education, Child Development, and Family Services http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/edchildfamily.pdf
131 Consumer Services http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/edchildfamily.pdf
132 Education Pathway http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/edchildfamily.pdf
133 Family and Human Services http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/edchildfamily.pdf
140 Electromechanical Installation and Maintenance See the CTE Standards – All Industry Sectors document, located at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/ctemcstandards.asp.
141 Environmental Resources http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/energyutilities.pdf
142 Telecommunications http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/energyutilities.pdf
143 Energy and Power Technology http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/energyutilities.pdf
150 Architectural Design http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/enginearchit.pdf
151 Computer Hardware, Electrical, and Networking Engineering http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/enginearchit.pdf
152 Engineering Design http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/enginearchit.pdf
153 Engineering Technology http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/enginearchit.pdf
154 Environmental Engineering http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/enginearchit.pdf
160 Fashion Design and Merchandising http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/fashioninterior.pdf
161 Interior Design http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/fashioninterior.pdf
162 Personal Services http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/fashioninterior.pdf
170 Information Support and Services http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/infocomtech.pdf
171 Media Support and Services http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/infocomtech.pdf
172 Networking http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/infocomtech.pdf
173 Programming and Systems Development http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/infocomtech.pdf
174 Software and Systems Development http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/infocomtech.pdf
175 Games and Simulations http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/infocomtech.pdf
180 Financial Services http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/bizfinance.pdf
181 International Business http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/bizfinance.pdf
182 Business Management http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/bizfinance.pdf
190 Biotechnology Research and Development http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/healthmedical.pdf
191 Diagnostic Services http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/healthmedical.pdf
192 Health Informatics http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/healthmedical.pdf
193 Support Services http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/healthmedical.pdf
194 Therapeutic Services http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/healthmedical.pdf
195 Mental and Behavioral Health http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/healthmedical.pdf
196 Biotechnology http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/healthmedical.pdf
197 Healthcare Operational Support http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/healthmedical.pdf
198 Patient Care http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/healthmedical.pdf
199 Public and Community Health http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/healthmedical.pdf
200 Food Science, Dietetics, and Nutrition http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/hosptourrec.pdf
201 Food Service and Hospitality http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/hosptourrec.pdf
202 Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreation http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/hosptourrec.pdf
210 Graphic Production Technologies http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/manproddev.pdf
211 Integrated Graphics Technology http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/manproddev.pdf
212 Machining and Forming Technologies http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/manproddev.pdf
213 Welding and Materials Joining See the CTE Standards – All Industry Sectors document, located at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/ctemcstandards.asp.
214 Introductory/Core See the CTE Standards – All Industry Sectors document, located at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/ctemcstandards.asp.
215 Emerging Technologies in Manufacturing and Product Development See the CTE Standards – All Industry Sectors document, located at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/ctemcstandards.asp.
216 Product Innovation and Design See the CTE Standards – All Industry Sectors document, located at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/ctemcstandards.asp.
220 Structural Repair and Refinishing http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/transportation.pdf
221 Systems Diagnostics, Services, and Repair http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/transportation.pdf
222 Aviation and Aerospace Transportation Services See the CTE Standards – All Industry Sectors document, located at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/ctemcstandards.asp.
223 Operations http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/transportation.pdf
230 Human Services See the CTE Standards – All Industry Sectors document, located at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/ctemcstandards.asp.
231 Legal Practices http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/pubservices.pdf
232 Public Safety http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/pubservices.pdf
233 Emergency Response http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/pubservices.pdf
240 E-Commerce See the CTE Standards – All Industry Sectors document, located at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/ctemcstandards.asp.
241 Entrepreneurship/Self-Employment http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/mktsalesservices.pdf
242 International Trade See the CTE Standards – All Industry Sectors document, located at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/ctemcstandards.asp.
243 Professional Sales http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/mktsalesservices.pdf
244 Marketing http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/mktsalesservices.pdf
250 Healthcare Administrative Services See the CTE Standards – All Industry Sectors document, located at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/ctemcstandards.asp.

NOTE These two codes will remain in effect as we transition to the ELPAC.

Valid Code Value Name Definition
1 Initial Identification The first time a student with a primary language that is not English has been assessed with the CELDT for English learner identification purposes.
2 Annual Assessment An annual assessment of the CELDT to a English learner to help gauge their English language acquisition.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
A History/Social Science The course meets UC/CSU requirements for History/Social Science.
B English The course meets UC/CSU requirements for English.
C Mathematics The course meets UC/CSU requirements for Mathematics.
D Laboratory Science The course meets UC/CSU requirements for Laboratory Science.
E Language other than English (i.e., foreign languages and American Sign Language) The course meets UC/CSU requirements for a Language other than English.
F Visual and Performing Arts The course meets UC/CSU requirements for Visual and Performing Arts.
GA History/Social Science Elective A preparatory elective in History/Social Science.
GB English Elective A preparatory elective in English.
GC Mathematics Elective A preparatory elective in Mathmatics.
GD Laboratory Science Elective A preparatory elective in Science.
GE Foreign Language Elective A preparatory elective in a Foreign Language.
GF Visual and Performing Arts Elective A preparatory elective in Visual and Performing Arts.
GO Other Elective A preparatory elective in any other subject area.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
10 Art Art
11 Computer Education Computer Education
12 Dance Dance
13 Drama/Theater Drama/Theater
14 English Language Arts English Language Arts
15 Foreign Languages Foreign Languages
16 Health Education Health Education
17 Humanities Humanities
18 Mathematics Mathematics
19 Physical Education Physical Education
20 Special Designated Subjects Special Designated Subjects
21 Science Science
22 History/Social Science History/Social Science
40 Career Technical Education Career Technical Education
41 Self-Contained Class Self-Contained Class
42 Music Music
43 Other Instruction-Related Assignments Other Instruction-Related Assignments
44 General Administration General Administration
45 Program/Subject Area Administration Program/Subject Area Administration
46 Support Services Support Services
47 Special Education Special Education
48 Department chair Department chair
Valid Code Value Name Definition
AC ASCENSION ISLAND ASCENSION ISLAND
AD ANDORRA ANDORRA
AE UNITED ARAB EMIRATES UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
AF AFGHANISTAN AFGHANISTAN
AG ANTIGUA AND BARBUDA ANTIGUA AND BARBUDA
AI ANGUILLA ANGUILLA
AL ALBANIA ALBANIA
AM ARMENIA ARMENIA
AN NETHERLANDS ANTILLES NETHERLANDS ANTILLES
AO ANGOLA ANGOLA
AQ ANTARCTICA ANTARCTICA
AR ARGENTINA ARGENTINA
AS AMERICAN SAMOA AMERICAN SAMOA
AT AUSTRIA AUSTRIA
AU AUSTRALIA AUSTRALIA
AW ARUBA ARUBA
AX ÅLAND ISLANDS Å+E238LAND ISLANDS
AZ AZERBAIJAN AZERBAIJAN
BA BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA
BB BARBADOS BARBADOS
BD BANGLADESH BANGLADESH
BE BELGIUM BELGIUM
BF BURKINA FASO BURKINA FASO
BG BULGARIA BULGARIA
BH BAHRAIN BAHRAIN
BI BURUNDI BURUNDI
BJ BENIN BENIN
BL SAINT BARTHELEMY SAINT BARTHELEMY
BM BERMUDA BERMUDA
BN BRUNEI DARUSSALAM BRUNEI DARUSSALAM
BO BOLIVIA, PLURINATIONAL
STATE OF
BOLIVIA, PLURINATIONALSTATE OF
BQ BONAIRE, SINT EUSTATIUS AND SABA BONAIRE, SINT EUSTATIUS AND SABA
BR BRAZIL BRAZIL
BS BAHAMAS BAHAMAS
BT BHUTAN BHUTAN
BU Burma Burma
BV BOUVET ISLAND BOUVET ISLAND
BW BOTSWANA BOTSWANA
BY BELARUS BELARUS
BZ BELIZE BELIZE
CA CANADA CANADA
CC COCOS (KEELING) ISLANDS COCOS (KEELING) ISLANDS
CD CONGO, THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO, THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE
CF CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC
CG CONGO CONGO
CH SWITZERLAND SWITZERLAND
CI CÔTE D'IVOIRE CÔTE D'IVOIRE
CK COOK ISLANDS COOK ISLANDS
CL CHILE CHILE
CM CAMEROON CAMEROON
CN CHINA CHINA
CO COLOMBIA COLOMBIA
CP CLIPPERTON ISLAND CLIPPERTON ISLAND
CQ Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia
CR COSTA RICA COSTA RICA
CS SERBIA AND MONTENEGRO SERBIA AND MONTENEGRO
CU CUBA CUBA
CV CAPE VERDE CAPE VERDE
CW CURAÇAO CURAÇAO
CX CHRISTMAS ISLAND CHRISTMAS ISLAND
CY CYPRUS CYPRUS
CZ CZECH REPUBLIC CZECH REPUBLIC
DE GERMANY GERMANY
DG DIEGO GARCIA DIEGO GARCIA
DJ DJIBOUTI DJIBOUTI
DK DENMARK DENMARK
DM DOMINICA DOMINICA
DO DOMINICAN REPUBLIC DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
DZ ALGERIA ALGERIA
EC ECUADOR ECUADOR
EE ESTONIA ESTONIA
EG EGYPT EGYPT
EH WESTERN SAHARA WESTERN SAHARA
ER ERITREA ERITREA
ES SPAIN SPAIN
ET ETHIOPIA ETHIOPIA
EU EUROPEAN UNION EUROPEAN UNION
FI FINLAND FINLAND
FJ FIJI FIJI
FK FALKLAND ISLANDS (MALVINAS) FALKLAND ISLANDS (MALVINAS)
FM MICRONESIA, FEDERATED STATES OF MICRONESIA, FEDERATED STATES OF
FO FAROE ISLANDS FAROE ISLANDS
FR FRANCE FRANCE
FX FRANCE, METROPOLITAN FRANCE, METROPOLITAN
GA GABON GABON
GB UNITED KINGDOM UNITED KINGDOM
GD GRENADA GRENADA
GE GEORGIA GEORGIA
GF FRENCH GUIANA FRENCH GUIANA
GG GUERNSEY GUERNSEY
GH GHANA GHANA
GI GIBRALTAR GIBRALTAR
GL GREENLAND GREENLAND
GM GAMBIA GAMBIA
GN GUINEA GUINEA
GP GUADELOUPE GUADELOUPE
GQ EQUATORIAL GUINEA EQUATORIAL GUINEA
GR GREECE GREECE
GS SOUTH GEORGIA AND THE SOUTH SANDWICH ISLANDS SOUTH GEORGIA AND THE SOUTH SANDWICH ISLANDS
GT GUATEMALA GUATEMALA
GU GUAM GUAM
GW GUINEA-BISSAU GUINEA-BISSAU
GY GUYANA GUYANA
HK HONG KONG HONG KONG
HM HEARD ISLAND AND MCDONALD ISLANDS HEARD ISLAND AND MCDONALD ISLANDS
HN HONDURAS HONDURAS
HR CROATIA CROATIA
HT HAITI HAITI
HU HUNGARY HUNGARY
ID INDONESIA INDONESIA
IE IRELAND IRELAND
IL ISRAEL ISRAEL
IM ISLE OF MAN ISLE OF MAN
IN INDIA INDIA
IO BRITISH INDIAN OCEAN TERRITORY BRITISH INDIAN OCEAN TERRITORY
IQ IRAQ IRAQ
IR IRAN, ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF IRAN, ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF
IS ICELAND ICELAND
IT ITALY ITALY
JE JERSEY JERSEY
JM JAMAICA JAMAICA
JO JORDAN JORDAN
JP JAPAN JAPAN
KE KENYA KENYA
KG KYRGYZSTAN KYRGYZSTAN
KH CAMBODIA CAMBODIA
KI KIRIBATI KIRIBATI
KM COMOROS COMOROS
KN SAINT KITTS AND NEVIS SAINT KITTS AND NEVIS
KP KOREA, DEMOCRATIC PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF KOREA, DEMOCRATIC PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
KR KOREA, REPUBLIC OF KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
KW KUWAIT KUWAIT
KY CAYMAN ISLANDS CAYMAN ISLANDS
KZ KAZAKHSTAN KAZAKHSTAN
LA LAO PEOPLE'S DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC LAO PEOPLE'S DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC
LB LEBANON LEBANON
LC SAINT LUCIA SAINT LUCIA
LI LIECHTENSTEIN LIECHTENSTEIN
LK SRI LANKA SRI LANKA
LR LIBERIA LIBERIA
LS LESOTHO LESOTHO
LT LITHUANIA LITHUANIA
LU LUXEMBOURG LUXEMBOURG
LV LATVIA LATVIA
LY LIBYAN ARAB JAMAHIRIYA LIBYAN ARAB JAMAHIRIYA
MA MOROCCO MOROCCO
MC MONACO MONACO
MD MOLDOVA, REPUBLIC OF MOLDOVA, REPUBLIC OF
ME MONTENEGRO MONTENEGRO
MF SAINT MARTIN SAINT MARTIN
MG MADAGASCAR MADAGASCAR
MH MARSHALL ISLANDS MARSHALL ISLANDS
MK MACEDONIA, THE FORMER YUGOSLAV REPUBLIC OF MACEDONIA, THE FORMER YUGOSLAV REPUBLIC OF
ML MALI MALI
MM MYANMAR MYANMAR
MN MONGOLIA MONGOLIA
MO MACAO MACAO
MP NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS
MQ MARTINIQUE MARTINIQUE
MR MAURITANIA MAURITANIA
MS MONTSERRAT MONTSERRAT
MT MALTA MALTA
MU MAURITIUS MAURITIUS
MV MALDIVES MALDIVES
MW MALAWI MALAWI
MX MEXICO MEXICO
MY MALAYSIA MALAYSIA
MZ MOZAMBIQUE MOZAMBIQUE
NA NAMIBIA NAMIBIA
NC NEW CALEDONIA NEW CALEDONIA
NE NIGER NIGER
NF NORFOLK ISLAND NORFOLK ISLAND
NG NIGERIA NIGERIA
NI NICARAGUA NICARAGUA
NL NETHERLANDS NETHERLANDS
NO NORWAY NORWAY
NP NEPAL NEPAL
NR NAURU NAURU
NU NIUE NIUE
NZ NEW ZEALAND NEW ZEALAND
OM OMAN OMAN
PA PANAMA PANAMA
PE PERU PERU
PF FRENCH POLYNESIA FRENCH POLYNESIA
PG PAPUA NEW GUINEA PAPUA NEW GUINEA
PH PHILIPPINES PHILIPPINES
PK PAKISTAN PAKISTAN
PL POLAND POLAND
PM SAINT PIERRE AND MIQUELON SAINT PIERRE AND MIQUELON
PN PITCAIRN PITCAIRN
PR PUERTO RICO PUERTO RICO
PS PALESTINIAN TERRITORY, OCCUPIED PALESTINIAN TERRITORY, OCCUPIED
PT PORTUGAL PORTUGAL
PW PALAU PALAU
PY PARAGUAY PARAGUAY
QA QATAR QATAR
RE R╔UNION R╔UNION
RO ROMANIA ROMANIA
RS SERBIA SERBIA
RU RUSSIAN FEDERATION RUSSIAN FEDERATION
RW RWANDA RWANDA
SA SAUDI ARABIA SAUDI ARABIA
SB SOLOMON ISLANDS SOLOMON ISLANDS
SC SEYCHELLES SEYCHELLES
SD SUDAN SUDAN
SE SWEDEN SWEDEN
SG SINGAPORE SINGAPORE
SH SAINT HELENA, ASCENSION AND TRISTAN DA CUNHA SAINT HELENA, ASCENSION AND TRISTAN DA CUNHA
SI SLOVENIA SLOVENIA
SJ SVALBARD AND JAN MAYEN SVALBARD AND JAN MAYEN
SK SLOVAKIA SLOVAKIA
SL SIERRA LEONE SIERRA LEONE
SM SAN MARINO SAN MARINO
SN SENEGAL SENEGAL
SO SOMALIA SOMALIA
SR SURINAME SURINAME
SS SOUTH SUDAN SOUTH SUDAN
ST SAO TOME AND PRINCIPE SAO TOME AND PRINCIPE
SU USSR USSR
SV EL SALVADOR EL SALVADOR
SY SYRIAN ARAB REPUBLIC SYRIAN ARAB REPUBLIC
SZ SWAZILAND SWAZILAND
TA TRISTAN DA CUNHA TRISTAN DA CUNHA
TC TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS
TD CHAD CHAD
TF FRENCH SOUTHERN TERRITORIES FRENCH SOUTHERN TERRITORIES
TG TOGO TOGO
TH THAILAND THAILAND
TJ TAJIKISTAN TAJIKISTAN
TK TOKELAU TOKELAU
TL TIMOR-LESTE TIMOR-LESTE
TM TURKMENISTAN TURKMENISTAN
TN TUNISIA TUNISIA
TO TONGA TONGA
TR TURKEY TURKEY
TT TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO
TV TUVALU TUVALU
TW TAIWAN, PROVINCE OF CHINA TAIWAN, PROVINCE OF CHINA
TZ TANZANIA, UNITED REPUBLIC OF TANZANIA, UNITED REPUBLIC OF
UA UKRAINE UKRAINE
UG UGANDA UGANDA
UK UNITED KINGDOM UNITED KINGDOM
UM UNITED STATES MINOR OUTLYING ISLANDS UNITED STATES MINOR OUTLYING ISLANDS
US UNITED STATES UNITED STATES
UU Unknown Unknown
UY URUGUAY URUGUAY
UZ UZBEKISTAN UZBEKISTAN
VA HOLY SEE (VATICAN CITY STATE) HOLY SEE (VATICAN CITY STATE)
VC SAINT VINCENT AND THE GRENADINES SAINT VINCENT AND THE GRENADINES
VE VENEZUELA, BOLIVARIAN
REPUBLIC OF
VENEZUELA, BOLIVARIANREPUBLIC OF
VG VIRGIN ISLANDS, BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS, BRITISH
VI VIRGIN ISLANDS, U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS, U.S.
VN VIET NAM VIET NAM
VU VANUATU VANUATU
WF WALLIS AND FUTUNA WALLIS AND FUTUNA
WS SAMOA SAMOA
YE YEMEN YEMEN
YT MAYOTTE MAYOTTE
YU YUGOSLAVIA YUGOSLAVIA
ZA SOUTH AFRICA SOUTH AFRICA
ZM ZAMBIA ZAMBIA
ZR ZAIRE ZAIRE
ZW ZIMBABWE ZIMBABWE
Valid Code Value Name Definition
10 Remedial The level of course content and instruction has been approved by the local governing board as intended to correct or improve one's knowledge in a specified content area.
11 Advanced Placement The level of course content and instruction has been approved as meeting the College Board criteria for designation as an Advanced Placement course.
12 Gifted and Talented The level of course content and instruction has been approved by the local governing board as meeting the criteria for designation as a Gifted and Talented course.
13 International Baccalaureate (IB) The level of course content and instruction has been identified as meeting the International Baccalaureate Organization criteria for designation as an International Baccalaureate course.
14 Honors - UC Certified The level of course content and instruction has been identified by the University of California System as meeting the criteria for designation as a UC-Certified Honors course.
15 Honors Non-UC certified The level of course content and instruction has been approved by the local governing board as meeting the criteria for designation as an Honors course. These honors courses are not the same as UC-Certified Honors courses.
16 College Credit A college-level, college credit bearing course in which a student receives college credit upon successful completion. These courses may also count toward the high school graduation requirements (i.e. the student receives both college credit and high school credit). These are not Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) courses (AP and IB courses have their own Course Group State Codes).
17 International Baccalaureate Middle Years (MYP) The level of course content and instruction has been identified as meeting the International Baccalaureate Organization criteria for designation as an International Baccalaureate Middle Years course.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
1000 Self-Contained Class A class that provides instruction in multiple content areas and is delivered in one classroom to one group of students.
2100 Reading improvement/developmental reading This course is designed to provide instruction in basic and developmental reading skills and strategies while emphasizing individual student progress. Course content depends on students' abilities entering the course and is designed to accelerate student growth in reading ability. Instruction may focus on reading silently or aloud, vocabulary development, comprehension, fluent decoding, reading/writing connections, text-based collaboration, student motivation and self-directed learning.
2101 Comprehensive English This course is designed to build upon the students' prior knowledge of grammar, vocabulary, word usage, and the mechanics of writing. The course introduces students to various genres of literature through writing exercises often linked to the reading selections. Students learn literary analysis skills. They also learn to write persuasive, critical, and creative multi-paragraph thematic essays and compositions. In upper-level courses, students write essays and learn the techniques of writing research papers.
2102 Basic English/Language Art (Proficiency Level.) This course is designed to provide instruction in basic language skills and integrates reading, writing, speaking, and listening while emphasizing individual student progress. Course content depends on the student's abilities entering the course. Instruction may include vocabulary building, spelling and grammar, writing and composition, reading silently or aloud, and improving listening and comprehension skills. The course may take place in a laboratory setting or resource center.
2105 American literature This course is designed to offer the student an opportunity to study and reflect upon American literature. Students improve their critical thinking skills as they determine the underlying assumptions and values presented in American literary works. Oral discussion and written composition are integral parts of the course emphasis. The course may survey representative works of a particular genre or a specific theme or works of a particular era of American literature.
2106 English literature This course is designed to offer the student an opportunity to study and reflect upon English literature. Students improve their critical thinking skills as they determine the underlying assumptions and values presented in English literary works. Oral discussion and written composition are integral parts of the course emphasis. The course may survey representative works of a particular genre or a specific theme or works of a particular era of English literature.
2107 Ethnic literature This course is designed to offer the student an opportunity to study and reflect on American literature written by the different ethnic groups that either immigrated or were brought forcibly to the United States. Students improve their critical thinking skills as they determine the underlying assumptions and values presented by the various authors. Oral discussion and written composition are integral parts of the course emphasis. The course may survey representative works of a particular ethnic group or a specific theme common to different ethnic groups or works of a particular era in American literature that portrays ethnic themes.
2108 World literature This course is designed to offer the student an opportunity to study and reflect upon world literature. Students improve their critical thinking skills as they determine the underlying assumptions and values presented in the different literature of the world. Oral discussion and written composition are integral parts of the course emphasis. The course may survey representative works of a particular genre or a specific theme or works of a particular era or world region.
2109 Other literature This designation is for any literature course not identified in the series of courses outlined in the CALPADS Course Group State codes.
2110 English Language Development The course focuses on reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Students participate in extensive listening and speaking exercises. The course covers basic structures of the English language. Students progress from an elementary understanding of English words and verb tenses to a more comprehensive grasp of various formal and informal styles. The course may include an orientation to the customs and cultures of people in the United States.
2111 Journalism Journalism prepares students for work on school newspapers by fostering habits of clear, concise, written expression and by developing the ability to write interestingly. The course improves students' use of grammar, spelling, punctuation, sentence and paragraph form, style, and structure and offers basic training in techniques of interviewing and news writing. It fosters a critical attitude toward news and develops the ability to evaluate the worth of publications through wide and intelligent readings of newspapers and periodicals.
2112 Speech Speech develops fundamentals of effective oral delivery such as voice, diction, poise, and ease. The course develops effective organization through selection and arrangement of material, transitions, and rhetorical effect. Activities include preparation and practice in making short speeches to inform, convince, stimulate, actuate, and/or entertain. The course may include instruction in parliamentary procedure, discussion, debate, and oral interpretation.
2113 Composition Composition emphasizes expository writing, logical development and statement of thought, and the refinement of basic writing skills. Though the structure of the course may include analyzing literature, its primary purpose is to improve the students' writing. Students compose papers using the descriptive, narrative, persuasive, or expositive mode.
2114 Advanced composition This course is designed to refine students' writing skills. Students develop different types of papers for various purposes and audiences. Students write paragraphs, essays, letters, applications, formal documented papers, or technical reports using the descriptive, narrative, persuasive, or expository mode. Although creative writing opportunities may be presented, the composition course focuses on nonfiction, scholarly, or formal writing.
2115 Forensics This course is designed to teach students how to employ oral skills effectively in formal and informal situations. Included in the course content are logic and reasoning, the organization of thought and supporting materials, and effective presentation of one's voice and body. The course introduces numerous public speaking situations that are often linked to an extracurricular program. Students learn the methods, aims, and styles of a variety of events (e.g., formal debate, expository speaking, radio broadcast, oral interpretation, and dramatic interpretation).
2116 Language structure/language arts This course covers traditional grammar, transformational grammar, and the mechanics in oral and written expression. The course may also include material on the history and development of language.
2117 Science fiction This course is designed to offer the students the opportunity to study and reflect upon science fiction literature. Students improve their critical thinking skills as they explore the various science fiction themes as presented by science fiction authors. Oral discussion and written composition are integral parts of the course emphasis. The course may survey representative works, reflect a particular genre or a specific theme, or survey works of a particular era.
2118 Expository Reading and Writing Developed by the California State University, the Expository Reading and Writing Course (ERWC) is designed to prepare students for success in postsecondary reading, writing, and thinking. Students in the course are taught to read, analyze, and write expository and persuasive texts in a systematic and structured process that includes critical reading, rhetorical analysis, and frequent writing tasks. Lessons are designed using a standard assignment template that is both comprehensive and flexible, deploying effective pedagogy informed by current research.
2120 Reading (state funded Miller-Unruh spec) This remedial reading course offers students the opportunity to improve their reading skills in the student's area of weakness. The course is designed to bring the student's reading comprehension up to a desired level or to develop strategies for the student to read more efficiently to progress at a steady rate through high school (state-funded Miller-Unruh).
2130 English 9 English 9 builds upon the students' prior knowledge of grammar, vocabulary, word usage, and mechanics of writing, and usually includes the four aspects of language use: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Various genres of literature, including expository and informational materials, are introduced, with written compositions in a variety of genres, often linked to the reading selections.
2131 English 10 English 10 offers students a balanced focus on composition and literature. Students learn to write persuasive, critical, and creative multi-paragraph thematic essays and compositions. The study of literature and other written material encompasses various genres as students improve their reading comprehension and develop the skills to determine the purposes and themes of authors and to recognize the techniques employed by authors to achieve their goals.
2132 English 11 English 11 courses continue to develop students' writing skills, emphasizing clear, logical writing patterns, word choice, and usage, as students write essays and learn the techniques of writing research papers. Students continue to read works of literature and other written materials that often form the backbone of the writing assignments.
2133 English 12 English 12 courses blend composition and literature as students write critical and comparative analyses of classic and contemporary literature and other written genres. Typically, multi-paragraph essays in a variety of genres predominate as the form of student composition, but one or more major research papers may also be required.
2161 MYP Language A MYP Language A is defined as the student's best language. It is typically but not necessarily the language of instruction in the school, and is fundamental to the curriculum as it crosses the boundaries of the traditional disciplines. The program distinguishes between the instrumental function of language when it emphasizes listening, viewing, speaking, reading and writing skills, and the study of literature, which encompasses a variety of periods and genres.
2170 AP   English Language This course is designed to parallel college-level English courses. It exposes students to prose written in a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts. The course emphasizes the interaction of authorial purpose, intended audience, and the subject at hand. Students learn to develop stylistic flexibility as they write compositions covering a variety of topics.
2171 AP   English Literature This course is designed to parallel college-level English courses. It enables students to develop critical standards for evaluating literature. Students study the language, character, actions, and theme in works of recognized literary merit; enrich their understanding of connotation, metaphor, irony, syntax, and tone; and write compositions of their own (including literary analysis, exposition, argument, narrative, and creative writing).
2173 IB Language A: Literature The IB Diploma Programme language A: literature
course develops understanding of the techniques
involved in literary criticism and promotes the ability
to form independent literary judgments. In language
A: literature, the formal analysis of texts and wide
coverage of a variety of literature—both in the language
of the subject and in translated texts from other cultural
domains—is combined with a study of the way literary
conventions shape responses to texts.
2174 IB Language A: Language and Literature The language A: language and literature course aims to develop skills of textual analysis and the understanding that texts, both literary and non-literary, can relate to culturally determined reading practices, and to encourage students to question the meaning generated by language and texts. An understanding of the ways in which formal elements are used to create meaning in a text is combined with an exploration of how that meaning is affected by reading practices that are culturally defined and by the circumstances of production and reception. Helping students to focus closely on the language of studied texts and to become aware of the role of wider context in shaping meaning is central to the course. The study of literature in translation from other cultures is especially important to IB DP students because it contributes to a global perspective. Texts are chosen from a variety of sources, genres and media.
2175 IB Literature and Performance SL The IB DP literature and performance course is an interdisciplinary synthesis of language A and theatre. It incorporates essential elements of literature and performance and aims to explore the dynamic relationship between the two. At the heart of the course is this interaction between (i) a conventional literary emphasis on close reading, critical writing and discussion and (ii) the practical, aesthetic and symbolic elements of performance. A distinctive outcome of this synthesis is the performance of a piece transformed from poetry or prose. In this exciting, creative process text is viewed from different angles in a way that goes beyond what is characteristic of either literary or theatre studies as single disciplines. The course as whole examines literary and dramatic texts and seeks to develop intellect, imagination and creativity. It encourages intercultural awareness through a study of texts from more than one culture. Literature
and performance is available at standard level only
2190 Dual Enrollment College Course - English Language Arts A college English language arts course taken by a student in which the student earns college credit. This course may also count toward the high school graduation requirements (i.e., the student receives both college credit and high school credit).  This is not an Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) course (AP and IB courses have their own Course Group State Codes).
2198 Other English course This designation is for any English course not identified in the series of courses outlined in the CALPADS Course Group State codes.
2200 German (first and second year) This course is designed to teach students about the language and culture of the German people. The first-year course emphasizes communication, basic grammar and syntax, and simple vocabulary so that students can read, write, speak, and comprehend on a basic level. The second-year course enables students to expand upon what they have learned, increasing their skills and depth of knowledge. The course teaches students to appreciate the German culture by acquainting students with the art, literature, customs, and history of the people.
2201 German (advanced) This course typically focuses on having students express more complex concepts both orally and in writing, as well as comprehend and react to native speech. The course teaches students to appreciate German culture by acquainting students with the art, literature, customs, and history of the people.
2202 Italian (first and second year) This course is designed to teach students about the language and culture of the Italian people. The first-year course emphasizes communication, basic grammar and syntax, and simple vocabulary so that students can read, write, speak, and comprehend on a basic level. The second-year course enables students to expand upon what they have learned, increasing their skills and depth of knowledge. The course teaches students to appreciate the Italian culture by acquainting students with the art, literature, customs, and history of the people.
2203 Italian (advanced) This course typically focuses on having students express more complex concepts both orally and in writing, as well as comprehend and react to native speech. The course teaches students to appreciate Italian culture by acquainting students with the art, literature, customs, and history of the people.
2204 French (first and second year) This course is designed to teach students about the French language and the culture of the French people in Europe and in the Americas. The first-year course emphasizes communication, basic grammar and syntax, and simple vocabulary so that students can read, write, speak, and comprehend on a basic level. The second-year course enables students to expand upon what they have learned, increasing their skills and depth of knowledge. The course teaches students to appreciate the French culture by acquainting students with the art, literature, customs, and history of the French-speaking people of Europe and the Americas.
2205 French (advanced) This course typically focuses on having students express more complex concepts both orally and in writing, as well as comprehend and react to native speech. The course teaches students to appreciate French culture by acquainting students with the art, literature, customs, and history of the French-speaking people of Europe, the Americas, and Africa.
2206 Spanish (first and second year) This course is designed to teach students about the language and culture of the Spanish and Latin American people. The first-year course emphasizes communication, basic grammar and syntax, and simple vocabulary so that students can read, write, speak, and comprehend on a basic level. The second-year course enables students to expand upon what they have learned, increasing their skills and depth of knowledge. The course teaches students to appreciate the Spanish and Latin American cultures by acquainting students with art, literature, customs, and history of the Spanish-speaking people.
2207 Spanish (advanced) This course typically focuses on having students express more complex concepts both orally and in writing, as well as comprehend and react to native speech. The course teaches students to appreciate Spanish and Latin American cultures by acquainting students with the art, literature, customs, and history of the Spanish-speaking people.
2208 Russian (first and second year) This course is designed to teach students about the language and culture of the Russian people. The first-year course emphasizes communication, basic grammar and syntax, and simple vocabulary so that students can read, write, speak, and comprehend on a basic level. The second-year course enables students to expand upon what they have learned, increasing their skills and depth of knowledge. The course teaches students to appreciate the Russian culture by acquainting students with the art, literature, customs, and history of the Russian people.
2209 Russian (advanced) This course typically focuses on having students express more complex concepts both orally and in writing, as well as comprehend and react to native speech. The course teaches students to appreciate the Russian culture by acquainting students with the art, literature, customs, and history of the Russian people.
2210 Latin (first and second year) This course introduces and develops grammatical concepts through the practice of structures, forms, and vocabulary. The course emphasizes pronunciation, vocabulary building, and study of the relationship of English to Latin. The reading materials offered pertain to Roman life and customs.
2211 Latin (advanced) This course reviews and broadens grammatical concepts through practice of structures, forms, and vocabulary. The course emphasizes pronunciation, vocabulary building, and study of the relationship of English to Latin. The reading materials offered pertain to Roman life and customs.
2212 Korean (first and second year) This course teaches students about the language and culture of the Korean people. The first-year course emphasizes communication, basic grammar and syntax, and simple vocabulary so that students can read, write, speak, and comprehend on a basic level. The second-year course enables students to expand upon what they have learned, increasing their skills and depth of knowledge. The course teaches students to appreciate the Korean culture by emphasizing the art, literature, customs, and history of the Korean people.
2213 Korean (advanced) This course typically focuses on having students express more complex concepts both orally and in writing, as well as comprehend and react to native speech. The course teaches students to appreciate the Korean culture by acquainting students with the art, literature, customs, and history of the Korean people.
2214 Chinese (first and second year) This course is designed to teach students about the language and culture of the Chinese people. The first-year course emphasizes communication, basic grammar and syntax, and simple vocabulary so that students can read, write, speak, and comprehend on a basic level. The second-year course enables students to expand upon what they have learned, increasing their skills and depth of knowledge. The course teaches students to appreciate the Chinese culture by acquainting students with the art, literature, customs, and history of the Chinese people.
2215 Chinese (advanced) This course typically focuses on having students express more complex concepts both orally and in writing, as well as comprehend and react to native speech. The course teaches students to appreciate Chinese culture by acquainting students with the art, literature, customs, and history of the Chinese people.
2216 Japanese (first and second year) This course is designed to teach students about the language and culture of the Japanese people. The first-year course emphasizes communication, basic grammar and syntax, and simple vocabulary so that students can read, write, speak, and comprehend on a basic level. The second-year course enables students to expand upon what they have learned, increasing their skills and depth of knowledge. The course teaches students to appreciate Japanese culture by acquainting students with the art, literature, customs, and history of the Japanese people.
2217 Japanese (advanced) This course typically focuses on having students express more complex concepts both orally and in writing, as well as comprehend and react to native speech. The course teaches students to appreciate the Japanese culture by acquainting students with the art, literature, customs, and history of the Japanese people.
2218 Portuguese (first and second year) This course is designed to teach students about the language and culture of the European Portuguese and Brazilians. The first-year course emphasizes communication, basic grammar and syntax, and simple vocabulary so that students can read, write, speak, and comprehend on a basic level. The second-year course enables students to expand upon what they have learned, increasing their skills and depth of knowledge. The course teaches students to appreciate the Portuguese and Brazilian culture by acquainting students with the art, literature, customs, and history of the Portuguese-speaking people.
2219 Portuguese (advanced) This course typically focuses on having students express more complex concepts both orally and in writing, as well as comprehend and react to native speech. The course teaches students to appreciate the Portuguese culture by acquainting students with the art, literature, customs, and history of the Portuguese-speaking people.
2220 Vietnamese (first and second year) This course is designed to teach students about the language and culture of the Vietnamese people. The first-year course emphasizes communication, basic grammar and syntax, and simple vocabulary so that students can read, write, speak, and comprehend on a basic level. The second-year course enables students to expand upon what they have learned, increasing their skills and depth of knowledge. The course teaches students to appreciate the Vietnamese culture by acquainting students with the art, literature, customs, and history of the Vietnamese people.
2221 Vietnamese (advanced) This course typically focuses on having students express more complex concepts both orally and in writing, as well as comprehend and react to native speech. The course teaches students to appreciate the Vietnamese culture by acquainting the students with the art, literature, customs, and history of the Vietnamese people.
2223 Chinese for native speakers Courses for native speakers of Chinese support, reinforce, and build upon students' knowledge and skills in their primary language. Because the students who enroll in these courses often are able to carry out a range of oral language functions with a high degree of competency, these courses often focus on literary development. These courses parallel English language arts in several ways, but especially those courses that emphasize composition and literature addressing ethnic themes. Often these courses also feature a strong cultural component focusing primarily on the study of histories and cultures within and beyond California and the United States of the respective ethnic group.
2224 Korean for native speakers Courses for native speakers of Korean support, reinforce, and build upon students' knowledge and skills in their primary language. Because the students who enroll in these courses often are able to carry out a range of oral language functions with a high degree of competency, these courses often focus on literary development. These courses parallel English language arts in several ways, but especially those courses that emphasize composition and literature addressing ethnic themes. Often these courses also feature a strong cultural component focusing primarily on the study of histories and cultures within and beyond California and the United States of the respective ethnic group.
2225 Spanish for native speakers Courses for native speakers of Spanish support, reinforce, and build upon students' knowledge and skills in their primary language. Because students who enroll in these courses often are able to carry out a range of oral language functions with a high degree of competency, these courses often focus on literary development. These courses parallel English language arts in several ways, but especially those courses that emphasize composition and literature addressing ethnic themes. Often these courses also feature a strong cultural component focusing primarily on the study of histories and cultures within and beyond California and the United States of the respective ethnic group.
2226 Other language course for native speakers Courses for native speakers support, reinforce, and build upon students' knowledge and skills in their primary language. Students who enroll in these courses often are able to carry out a range of oral language functions with a high degree of competency. Therefore these courses often focus on literary development. These courses parallel English language arts in several ways but especially those courses that emphasize composition and literature addressing ethnic themes. Often these courses also feature a strong cultural component focusing primarily on the study of histories and cultures within and beyond California and the United States of the respective ethnic group.
2227 Filipino (first and second year) This course is designed to teach students about the language and culture of the Filipino people. The first-year course emphasizes communication, basic grammar and syntax, and simple vocabulary so that students can read, write, speak, and comprehend on a basic level. The second-year course enables students to expand upon what they have learned, increasing their skills and depth of knowledge. The course teaches students to appreciate the Filipino culture by acquainting students with the art, literature, customs, and history of the Filipino people.
2228 Filipino (advanced) This course typically focuses on having students express more complex concepts both orally and in writing, as well as comprehend and react to native speech. The course teaches students to appreciate the Filipino culture by acquainting the students with the art, literature, customs, and history of the Filipino people.
2230 American sign language American Sign Language (ASL) is the sign language most commonly used in the North American deaf community. ASL is a rich and complex visual-gestural language, with a grammatical structure independent of English. ASL is often acquired as a first language by deaf children who have deaf parents.
2261 IB  Language B Offered at two levels in 27 languages, Language B is designed for foreign language learners and focuses principally on the interaction between speakers and writers of the target language. The aim of the program is to prepare students to use the language appropriately in a range of situations and contexts and for a variety of purposes. The skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized and are taught and developed through the study of a range of authentic oral and written texts (literary and others) chosen by the teacher. The course also allows students to develop an awareness and appreciation of the culture(s) of the countries in which the target language is spoken.
2262 IB  Classical languages Offered at two levels in Latin or Classical Greek, Classical Languages is designed to give students the basic linguistic skills they need to read standard classical authors with understanding in the original language and to provide them with a better understanding of classical civilization and of its essential differences from, and similarities to, their own. In both Latin and Classical Greek, students read prescribed works in the original language and in translation. Authors to be studied include Virgil, Homer, Cicero, and Sophocles. Students are assessed on their ability to translate, but not write, in the target language. They also need to demonstrate an appreciation and knowledge of the cultural and historical background surrounding the prescribed texts and topics.
2264 IB  Ab initio Offered at only the subsidiary/standard level in ten languages, Language Ab Initio is designed for students who have had no previous instruction in the target language. The fast-paced two-year foreign language course takes students from the beginning and provides them with a foundation for further study of the target language while developing their ability to communicate in speech and in writing so that they may deal adequately with familiar and practical needs. It also introduces them to the culture(s) of the countries where the language is spoken.
2265 MYP Language B MYP Language B, an additional modern language, is the means by which one communicates with another linguistic community and the gateway to the understanding of another culture. The study of Language B fosters communication skills and the appreciation of other cultures, increasing the students' self-knowledge and their knowledge of the world.
2270 AP  French language The course is designed to parallel third-year college-level courses in French composition and conversation. Building on a prior knowledge of French, the course develops the students' ability to understand others and express themselves accurately, coherently, and fluently in French. Through these courses students develop a large enough vocabulary to understand literary texts, magazine/newspaper articles, films, and television productions.
2271 AP  French literature The course is designed to parallel third-year college-level courses in French Literature. AP French Literature covers representative works of French literature and builds students' French-language proficiency so that they are able to read and understand moderately difficult prose and express critical opinions and analyses in oral and written French. The study of literary components (such as character, theme, structure, imagery, style, and tone) is an important part of the course.
2272 AP  German language The course is designed to parallel third-year college-level courses in German composition and conversation. The course builds on prior knowledge and develops students' ability to understand others and express themselves accurately, coherently, and fluently in German. Throughout the course, students develop a large enough vocabulary to understand literary texts, magazine/newspaper articles, films, and television productions.
2273 AP  Latin-Vergil This course parallels advanced college-level Latin. By building upon the students' prior knowledge of Latin, the course enables students to read the language with comprehension to accurately translate Latin into English and to appreciate the stylistic literary techniques used by the poet Vergil. The course also includes the study of the political, social, and cultural background of the literary works of Vergil, as well as his influence on later literature.
2274 AP  Latin literature This course parallels advanced college-level Latin. By building upon the students' increased knowledge of Latin, the course enables students to read the language with comprehension to accurately translate Latin into English and to appreciate the stylistic literary techniques used by authors Catullus and Horace. The course includes the study of the political, social, and cultural background of the literary works of Cattalos and Horace, as well as their influence on later literature.
2275 AP  Spanish language The course is designed to parallel third-year college-level courses in Spanish composition and conversation. Building upon students' prior knowledge of Spanish, the course develops the students' ability to understand and express themselves accurately, coherently, and fluently in Spanish. In the course, students develop a large enough vocabulary to understand literary texts, magazine/newspaper articles, films, and television productions.
2276 AP  Spanish literature The course is designed to parallel a third-year college-level introductory Spanish literature course. AP Spanish Literature covers representative works from the literature of Spain and the Spanish-speaking people of Latin America. The course builds upon the students' Spanish-language proficiency so that they are able to read and understand moderately difficult prose, express critical opinions, and provide literary analyses of Spanish works in oral or written form.
2277 AP  Italian Language and Culture This course is designed to be comparable to college/university Italian courses that serve as a transition between language courses and linguistics or content-based courses. These transition courses are typically taught in the fourth semester, or the equivalent. Its aim is to develop students' reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills within a cultural frame of reference reflective of the richness of Italian language and culture.
2278 AP  Chinese Language and Culture This course is designed to be comparable to fourth semester (or equivalent) college/university courses in Mandarin Chinese. This course prepares students to demonstrate their level of Chinese proficiency across the three communicative modes (interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational) and the five goal areas (communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities) as outlined in the Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century. Its aim is to provide students with the ongoing and varied opportunities to further develop their proficiencies across the full range of language skills within a cultural frame of reference reflective of the richness of Chinese language and culture.
2279 AP Japanese Language and Culture This course is designed to be comparable to college/university Japanese courses that represent the point at which students complete approximately 300 hours of college-level classroom instruction. The course supports students as they develop the productive, receptive, and cultural skills necessary to communicate with native speakers of Japanese. The course articulates its goals in terms of the Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century (Standards) three modes of communication: interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational. Employing these communication modes as a framework upon which to weave its content, the course also addresses the Standards' other important goals: cultural competence, connections to other school disciplines, comparisons between the target language and culture and those of the learners, and the use of the language within a broader community beyond the traditional school environment.
2281 IB Language A: Literature (non-English) The IB Diploma Programme language A: literature (non-English)
course develops understanding of the techniques
involved in literary criticism and promotes the ability
to form independent literary judgments. In language
A: literature, the formal analysis of texts and wide
coverage of a variety of literature—both in the language
of the subject and in translated texts from other cultural
domains—is combined with a study of the way literary
conventions shape responses to texts.
2282 IB Language A: Language and Literature (non-English) The language A: language and literature (non-English) course aims to develop skills of textual analysis and the understanding that texts, both literary and non-literary, can relate to culturally determined reading practices, and to encourage students to question the meaning generated by language and texts. An understanding of the ways in which formal elements are used to create meaning in a text is combined with an exploration of how that meaning is affected by reading practices that are culturally defined and by the circumstances of production and reception. Helping students to focus closely on the language of studied texts and to become aware of the role of wider context in shaping meaning is central to the course. The study of literature in translation from other cultures is especially important to IB DP students because it contributes to a global perspective. Texts are chosen from a variety of sources, genres and media.
2283 IB Literature and Performance SL (non-English) The IB DP literature and performance course (non-English) is an interdisciplinary synthesis of language A and theatre. It incorporates essential elements of literature and performance and aims to explore the dynamic relationship between the two. At the heart of the course is this interaction between (i) a conventional literary emphasis on close reading, critical writing and discussion and (ii) the practical, aesthetic and symbolic elements of performance. A distinctive outcome of this synthesis is the performance of a piece transformed from poetry or prose. In this exciting, creative process text is viewed from different angles in a way that goes beyond what is characteristic of either literary or theatre studies as single disciplines. The course as whole examines literary and dramatic texts and seeks to develop intellect, imagination and creativity. It encourages intercultural awareness through a study of texts from more than one culture. Literature
and performance is available at standard level only.
2290 Dual Enrollment College Course - Foreign Languages A college foreign language course taken by a student in which the student earns college credit. This course may also count toward the high school graduation requirements (i.e., the student receives both college credit and high school credit).  This is not an Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) course (AP and IB courses have their own Course Group State Codes).
2298 Other foreign language course This designation is for any foreign language course not identified in the series of courses outlined in the CALPADS Course Group State codes.
2300 Band This program is a performing band, typically of fifteen or more students, in which students learn proper individual and band instrument technique, receive standards-based sequential music instruction. It may include guitar band, garage band, symphonic band, marching band, Mariachi, jazz band, swing bands, or stage bands. There may be more than one band group at the same time, within the course of instruction.
2303 Orchestra/symphony This course is inclusive of fourteen or more students in which they learn proper individual and ensemble instrumental techniques; the elements of music; orchestra music of different styles, cultures, and periods; is inclusive of music standards instruction learning. It provides demonstration of the learning; and includes utilization of the learning through performances.
2305 Chorus/choir/vocal ensemble This course is inclusive of students learning proper vocal choral, choir and ensemble techniques, the elements of music, and choral music of different styles, cultures, and periods; it may include principals of music drama and appropriate acting within the musical theatre arena. This course offers instruction inclusive of music standards and may include vocal jazz, show or swing choir, Broadway chorus or Blues, jazz choir, madrigal, chamber, vocal ensemble, world music choir/chorus, musical theatre choir, and others; it may provide demonstration of the learning; and includes utilization of the learning through performances. There may be several choral or ensemble groups at the same time, within the course of instruction.
2307 Music appreciation/history/literature This class emphasizes listening activities related to the structure or design of the music from perceptual, creative, historical, and critical viewpoints using a variety of musical forms and styles.
2308 Music theory This class concentrates on the theoretical aspects of music, such as symbols, intervals, scale and chord structure, duration, meter, pitch, and harmony. Classes such as Harmony, Theory, and Styles belong in this category and not in Music History if the largest proportion of study is theoretical rather than historical or cultural.
2309 Composition/songwriting This class is for students who wish to express themselves through creation of music. It may or may not have a prerequisite of music theory and/or ability to play a melodic instrument; it may use either non conventional or conventional notation; it may include harmonization in addition to melody writing; it may use computers for creating music.
2316 Voice class This class is one in which students learn to use their voices appropriately by singing various types of music, especially chosen for the unique characteristics of their voice (such as range, timbre, tessitura). They also study the elements of music and learn to read music. For this course, a student may perform individually but not as part of a choir/chorus/ensemble.
2322 Musical theater This class is one in which students learn vocal music techniques, principles of musical drama, and acting techniques. They learn skills through performing examples of musical theater, including, but not confined to, Broadway shows.
2323 Computers and electronics/digital music This course is devoted to music composed or realized through electronic media or computer applications related to music, such as creative work, music writing and printing, and performances of contemporary compositions. The course is inclusive of music standards instruction, the study of appropriate physics of sound, and students learn to use the equipment through performance of music from other sources and explore personal means of self-expression.
2324 Instrumental music lessons (elem school stand) This course provides individual class instrumental instruction (brass, guitar, keyboard, digital, percussion, recorders, strings, woodwinds) where students learn to play specific instruments and identify their unique contributions to various types of ensembles. This course provides a study of the elements of music and learning to read music; students are taught to the elementary music standards. This class does not normally perform as a group other than an end of course demonstration of learning. If the class performs, it should be coded as one of the instrumental categories (band, ensemble, or orchestra/symphony).
2325 Instrumental music lessons (sec school stand) This course provides individual class instrumental instruction (brass, guitar, keyboard, digital, percussion, recorders, strings, woodwinds) where students learn to play specific instruments and identify their unique contributions to various types of ensembles; provides a study of the elements of music and learning to read music and is taught to the proficient and/or advanced music standards. This class does not normally perform as a group other than an end of course demonstration of learning. If the class performs, it should be coded as one the instrumental categories (band, ensemble or orchestra/symphony).
2326 General/classroom/exploratory music (elem) This class is designed to develop the student's ability to make discriminating judgments regarding music through a variety of musical experiences. The class is inclusive of elementary music standards instruction, the elements of music as found in many different styles, cultures, and periods of music. Classes may include Music, Exploratory Music, Introduction to Music, and others. This class does not normally perform as a group other than an end of course demonstration of learning. If the class performs on a regular basis, it should be coded under another vocal or instrumental course.
2327 General/exploratory/introduction to music (sec) This class is designed to develop the student's ability to make discriminating judgments regarding music through a variety of musical experiences. The class is inclusive of secondary music standards instruction, the elements of music as found in many different styles, cultures, and periods of music. Classes may include Mime and Music, Music Introduction, Today's Music, Music of Yesterday and Today, Music Survey, World of Music, and others. This class does not normally perform as a group other than an end of course demonstration of learning. If the class performs on a regular basis, it should be coded under another vocal or instrumental course.
2328 Instrumental ensemble This course is for instrumental performing groups, typically of two to fourteen students, in which students learn proper individual and ensemble instrument technique, receive standards-based sequential music instruction. It may include world music ensembles, percussion or drumming ensembles, recorder ensemble, jazz ensemble, swing ensemble, guitar ensemble, stage ensemble, or Mariachi. There may be several ensemble groups at the same time, within the course of instruction.
2352 Dance choreography and production This course studies dance as a communicative art. It includes dance technique, choreography, and production. Students may experience more than one dance form (modern, jazz, ballet, tap, or others). They gain an appreciation of dance as an art form and develop self-expression. Students gain an appreciation of dance as an art form and develop self-expression through direct experience. The course includes application of the elements and principles of dance, study of historical and contemporary dance from a worldwide perspective, and instruction in the critique process.
2353 Dance, Movement, & Rhythmic Fund.(elem stand) This course focuses on dance and rhythmic expression through body movement. The course emphasizes expressive movement with multiple dance styles (ballet, jazz, modern, tap, etc.) and is instructed to elementary visual arts standards. Students may explore movement through various forms of dance from many cultures that use dance in work and leisure activities.
2354 Folk/traditional dance In this course, students learn basic steps and different combinations of steps and patterns to a variety of folk, square, world, and social dances from traditions such as African, Asian, Filipino, folklorico, Israeli, Native American, Pacific Islander, and Scandinavian. The emphasis of the course is to develop students' appreciation of the cultural, historical, and recreational background, purposes, and value of dance. The course may specialize in one tradition, such as folklorico.
2355 Dance, Movement, & Rhythmic Fund(sec standards) This course focuses on dance and rhythmic expressions through body movement. The course emphasizes expressive movement with multiple dance styles (ballet, jazz, modern, tap, etc.) and is instructed to proficient and/or advanced visual arts standards. Students may explore movement through various forms of dance from many cultures that use dance in work and leisure activities.
2356 Advanced Dance Study (Independent or Studio) This course is for the highly motivated student interested in the serious study of dance technique and history. It may develop dance technique in a small-group situation for students with prior dance experience. Participation requires audition and emphasizes performance. The course includes application of the elements and principles of dance, philosophy and techniques of dance, a study of historical and contemporary dance from a worldwide perspective, and instruction in the critique process.
2357 Ballet, Modern, Jazz, World Dance This advanced dance course provides experience in one dance form or several (e.g., ballet, modern, jazz, tap, world). The course concentrates on improving techniques and may offer or require choreographic and evaluation experiences.
2358 Other dance course This course may specialize in one or more specific dance forms, such as tap, jazz, world dance, ballet, or modern or improvisational dance. Emphasis is on acquisition of technique or on choreography, expression, appreciation of dance as an art form, ability to work in a group, or performance experience. The course includes application of the elements and principles of dance, a study of historical and contemporary dance from a worldwide perspective, and instruction in the critique process.
2360 IB  Music Offered at two levels, Music is designed to promote a greater awareness and understanding of the power and variety of musical experiences for those who have a general interest in music and for those who intend to continue their formal study of music. Candidates are exposed to a broad spectrum of music, ranging from classical and modern Western traditions to that of other regions and cultures. At both levels, the creative and practical aspects of music are evenly balanced with the theoretical or academic. All students study basic music theory, undertake general and detailed studies of Western music from different time periods and of world music from each continent, and participate in the creation of music through compositions or performance. Candidates are not expected to play more than one instrument but may choose more than one (including the voice) if they wish.
2361 MYP Music MYP Music brings students into contact with the performing art forms and aesthetic values of other cultures as well as their own, and helps to develop perceptions between ideas and art. Students are encouraged to identify particular creative abilities and to master techniques appropriate to that form of expression. In addition to developing the student's own imagination and skills, the program seeks to acquaint students with the creations of men and women whose works have proven to be of enduring worth.
2362 IB Dance The IB DP dance course takes a holistic approach to dance, and embraces a variety of dance traditions and dance cultures—past, present and looking towards the future. Performance, creative and analytical skills are mutually developed and valued whether the students are writing papers or creating/performing dances. The curriculum provides students with a liberal arts orientation to dance. This orientation facilitates the development of students who may become choreographers, dance scholars, performers or those, more broadly, who seek life enrichment through dance.
2370 AP  Music theory This course is designed to be the equivalent of a first-year music theory college course. The course develops students' understanding of musical structure and compositional procedures. Usually intended for students possessing performance-level skills, this course extends and builds on the students' knowledge of intervals, scales, chords, metric/rhythmic patterns, and their interaction in composition. Musical notation, analysis, composition, and aural skills are important components of the course.
2398 Other music course This designation is for any music course not identified in the series of courses outlined in the CALPADS Course Group State Codes.
2400 General math/basic math/vocational math This is a general mathematics course designed to reinforce basic skills in mathematics and teach students the application of these skills to real world problems and situations. The topics covered include arithmetic using rational numbers, the numeration systems, and place value. The higher grades may include basic geometry and basic statistics.
2401 Consumer math/senior math This is a general mathematics course designed to reinforce basic mathematics skills and link those skills to consumer applications. Such applications may include budgeting, taxation, credit, banking service, insurance, buying and selling products and services, home and/or car ownership and rental, managing personal income, and investment.
2402 Remedial math/proficiency development This is a course of basic skills in addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of whole numbers, as well as fractions and decimals. The course is designed for low achieving students. To effectively assist students, teachers individualize and/or make use of small group instruction. The teaching techniques emphasize the use of manipulatives and other tools, including technological tools in a laboratory setting.
2403 Beginning algebra/algebra I (one year course) In this course, students develop an understanding of the symbolic language of mathematics and the sciences. Algebraic skills and concepts are developed and used in a wide variety of problem-solving situations. The course includes a study of the real number system; the solving of equations and inequalities; linear, polynomial, and rational functions; graphing; systems of two linear equations; polynomials; rational expressions and functions; the quadratic formula; and logical reasoning.
2404 Intermediate algebra/algebra II This course complements and expands the mathematical content and concepts of Algebra I and geometry. Students will gain experience with algebraic solutions of problems in various content areas, including the solution of systems of quadratic equations, logarithmic and exponential functions, the binomial theorem, and the complex number system. Course topics include absolute value, systems of linear equations and inequalities, matrices, operations on polynomials, rational expressions, quadratic equations and functions, conic sections, inverse functions, sequences and series, probabilities, and mathematical induction.
2407 Trigonometry Trigonometry uses the techniques that students have previously learned from the study of algebra and geometry where the trigonometric functions studied are defined geometrically rather than in terms of algebraic equations. Facility with these functions, as well as the ability to prove basic identities regarding them, is especially important for students intending to study calculus, more advanced mathematics, physics and other sciences, and engineering in college. Course topics include radian measure; unit circle; trigonometric identities; graphs of trigonometric functions and their inverse; polar coordinates; and complex numbers.
2408 Intermediate algebra and trigonometry This is a course of studies that integrates intermediate algebra and trigonometry. Topics include: field properties and theorems; set theory; operations with rational and irrational expressions; factoring of rational expressions; in-depth study of linear equations and inequalities; graphing of constants, linear and quadratic equations; properties of higher degree equations; operations with rational and irrational exponents; right trigonometric and circular functions, inverses and graphs; trigonometric identities and equations; solutions of right and oblique triangles; complex numbers; and numerical tables.
2409 Solid geometry/trigonometry This course is designed to prepare students for eventual work in calculus. Topics include: the study of right trigonometric and circular functions, inverses, and graphs; trigonometric identities and equations; solutions of right and oblique triangles; complex numbers; numerical tables; polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and rational functions and their graphs; vectors; set theory; Boolean algebra and symbolic logic; mathematical induction; matrix algebra; sequences and series; and limits and continuity.
2410 Probability and Statistics This course is an introduction to the study of probability, interpretation of data, and fundamental statistical problem solving. Mastery of this academic content will provide students with a solid foundation in probability theory and calculations and facility in processing statistical information. Topics include independent events, conditional probability, discrete random variables; standard distributions; mean, median, and mode; variance and standard deviation; and data organization.
2411 Modern abstract algebra Modern abstract algebra is a high level algebra course that covers advanced topics from groups, rings, modules and fields including applications to combinatories and coding theory. The course prerequisite is advanced algebra.
2412 Linear Algebra In this course students learn the techniques of matrix manipulation so that they can solve systems of linear equations in any number of variables. Linear algebra is most often combined with another subject, such as trigonometry, mathematical analysis, or pre-calculus. Topics include: operations on matrices; inverse matrices; determinants; vectors; and linear systems.
2413 Geometry This course develops geometry skills and concepts useful to all students. Students will develop their ability to construct formal, logical arguments and proofs in geometric settings and problems. The course includes congruence and similarity; the Pythagorean theorem; basic constructions; coordinate geometry; properties of angles, parallel and perpendicular lines, triangles, special right triangles, quadrilaterals, and circles; basic trigonometric function; perimeter, circumference, area, volume, lateral area, and surface area of common geometric figures.
2414 Analytic geometry/pre-calculus This course prepares students for work in calculus. Topics include: coordinate geometry with analytical methods and proofs; equations and graphs of conic sections; rectangular and polar coordinates; parametric equations; vectors; the study of polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and rational functions and their graphs; induction; limits and rate change; continuity; and problem analysis. The course unifies and emphasizes the structure of mathematics.
2415 Calculus Calculus courses include the study of derivatives, differentiation, integration, the definite and indefinite integral, and applications of calculus. Typically, students have previously attained knowledge of pre-calculus topics (some combination of trigonometry, elementary functions, analytic geometry, and math analysis).
2417 Adv algebra/adv geometry/symbolic logic/theory Courses in this category include extended algebraic concepts for students who have taken intermediate algebra or advanced topics in geometry. Algebra topics include: the study of polynomials; logarithmic; exponentials and rational functions; as well as studies in set theory; Boolean algebra; symbolic logic; mathematical induction; matrix algebra; limits; and continuity. In geometry, topics deal with the intersection of lines, planes in space, vectors, polar coordinates, equations and graphs of conic sections, rotations and transformations, and parametric equations.
2420 Math A Math A is a transition course emphasizing mathematics as problem solving, communication, and reasoning. Students not ready for the core curriculum learn essential mathematical ideas that help the student succeed in later courses. The course focuses on patterns and properties in mathematics, fundamental ideas in geometry and spatial visualization, data analysis, large numbers, graphs, growth and decay, models for operations, measurement, probability, and functions. The course includes: open investigations that embody relevant applications; and introduces mathematical tools in the context of these applications.
2421 Math B Math B is a second transition course to develop essential mathematical ideas that help students succeed in later courses. The goal is to develop students' understanding of key mathematical ideas in algebraic and geometrical thinking that are crucial to success both in the core college-preparatory curriculum and in vocational-technical courses. Students develop non-mathematical skills that are essential for success in high school mathematics, such as organizing work, making generalizations, working cooperatively, using technology as a tool, and communicating effectively.
2422 Math analysis This course combines the trigonometric, geometric, and algebraic techniques needed to prepare students for the study of calculus and strengthens their conceptual understanding of problems and mathematical reasoning in solving problems. This course takes a functional point of view toward those topics. The most significant new concept is that of limits. Mathematical analysis is often combination with a course in trigonometry or perhaps with one in linear algebra to make a year-long pre-calculus course. Topics include polar coordinates, vectors, complex numbers, limits, mathematical induction, fundamental theorem of algebra, conic sections, rational functions, and functions and equations defined parametrically.
2423 Accelerated math (any of grades 4-8) This course is designed for students who have accelerated mathematics skills and progress beyond what is expected for their grade level.
2424 Pre-algebra Pre-algebra provides an extra year of study for students who have attained standard mathematics objectives, but are not ready to enter algebra. Pre-algebra covers a variety of topics, such as exponents and radicals, the rectangular coordinate system, sets, logic formulas, and solving first-degree equations and inequalities.
2425 Integrated mathematics I college prep Integrated Mathematics Course I is the first of three mathematics courses required for college entrance. The course content includes: functions; algebra; geometry; statistics; probability; discrete mathematics; measurement; number; logic; and language. The course emphasizes mathematical reasoning, problem solving, and communication through integration of the various strands, connections with other subject areas and real-life applications, use of technology, and exploratory and group activities. The course emphasizes algebra.
2426 Integrated mathematics II college prep Integrated Mathematics Course II is the second of three mathematics courses required for college entrance. The course content expands upon the mathematical content and techniques of Integrated Mathematics Course I. In addition to further development of the strands with connections and applications, this course emphasizes unifying ideas such as mathematical modeling and argumentation, variation, algorithmic thinking, and multiple representations. The course emphasizes geometry.
2427 Integrated mathematics III college prep Integrated Mathematics Course III is the third of three mathematics courses required for college entrance. The course content expands upon the mathematical content and techniques of Course II. Connections among the strands and unifying ideas continue with attention given to depth of understanding. Students successfully completing Course III are prepared for pre-calculus or alternative mathematics courses that emphasize real-world applications in the social sciences, or life and physical sciences. The course emphasizes advanced algebra and trigonometry.
2428 Beginning Algebra Part 1(1st yr of 2 yr course) Symbolic reasoning and calculations with symbols are central in algebra. Through the study of algebra, a student develops an understanding of symbolic language of mathematics and the sciences. In addition, algebraic skills and concepts are developed and used in a wide variety of problem-solving situations. In the first year of a two-year algebra course, the properties and operations of the real numbers are introduced as well as solving and graphing linear equations and inequalities also using absolute value.
2429 Beginning Algebra Part 2 (2nd of 2 year course) Symbolic reasoning and calculations with symbols are central in algebra. Through the study of algebra, a student develops an understanding of symbolic language of mathematics and the sciences. In addition, algebraic skills and concepts are developed and used in a wide variety of problem-solving situations. The second year of this two-year course extends their knowledge of the real numbers and systems of linear equations and inequalities as well as develops the use and understanding of linear, quadratic, exponential, and rational equations and functions They solve and graph quadratic functions and use and apply quadratic equations. The quadratic formula is developed and used.
2430 Integrated Mathematics IV (college preparatory) The Integrated Mathematics Course IV is for programs that cover the Integrated Mathematics subjects in four years, instead of three years. The course emphasizes advanced geometry, advanced algebra, and probability and statistics.
2431 Math 6 (grade 6 standards) In this course students master arithmetic operations and their applications using integers and positive fractions and decimals. Students learn to add and multiply fractions and conceptually understand ratios, proportions, and percentages. Student understands the concepts of mean, median, mode, and range of data sets and how to use charts and graphs. Students know pi and the circumference and area of a circle and the formulas for basic geometric shapes and can solve one-step linear equations.
2432 Math 7 (grade 7 standards) In this course students master arithmetic operations and their applications using integers and positive fractions and decimals. Students learn to add and multiply fractions and conceptually understand ratios, proportions, and percentages. Student understands the concepts of mean, median, mode, and range of data sets and how to use charts and graphs. Students know pi and the circumference and area of a circle and the formulas for basic geometric shapes and can solve one-step linear equations.
2433 Algebra Readiness This course is designed to assist students in mastering sixteen target standards with a primary focus on developing students' mastery of arithmetic concepts and skills. Materials should include a wide range of difficulty, starting with simple one-step problems and progressing to multi-step problems to ensure student success. Units should include whole numbers and their operations, rational numbers and their operations, symbolic notation, equations and functions, the coordinate plane, graphing proportional relationships, and Algebra.
2434 Grade 6 Mathematics – Common Core In grade six, instructional time should focus on four critical areas: (1) connecting ratio, rate, and percentage to whole number multiplication and division and using concepts of ratio and rate to solve problems; (2) completing understanding of division of fractions and extending the notion of number to the system of rational numbers, which includes negative numbers; (3) writing, interpreting, and using expressions and equations; and (4) developing understanding of statistical thinking. Students also work toward fluency with multi-digit division and multi-digit decimal operations.
2435 Grade 7 Mathematics - Common Core In grade seven instructional time should focus on four critical areas: (1) developing understanding of and applying proportional relationships, including percentages; (2) developing understanding of operations with rational numbers and working with expressions and linear equations; (3) solving problems involving scale drawings and informal geometric constructions and working with two- and three-dimensional shapes to solve problems involving area, surface area, and volume; and (4) drawing inferences about populations based on samples:

Students also work towards fluently solving equations of the form px + q = r and p(x + q) = r.
2436 Grade 8 Mathematics – Common Core  In grade eight, instructional time should focus on three critical areas: (1) formulating and reasoning about expressions and equations, including modeling an association in bivariate data with a linear equation, and solving linear equations and systems of linear equations; (2) grasping the concept of a function and using functions to describe quantitative relationships; (3) analyzing two- and three-dimensional space and figures using distance, angle, similarity, and congruence and understanding and applying the Pythagorean Theorem. Students also work towards fluency with solving simple sets of two equations with two unknowns by inspection.
2437 Algebra 1 – Common Core The main purpose of Algebra I is to develop students' fluency with linear, quadratic and exponential functions. The critical areas of instruction involve deepening and extending students' understanding of linear and exponential relationships by contrasting them with each other and by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend. In addition, students engage in methods for analyzing, solving, and using exponential and quadratic functions.  Some of the overarching ideas in the Algebra I course include: the notion of function, solving equations, rates of change and growth patterns, graphs as representations of functions, and modeling.
2438 Algebra II – Common Core The purpose of this course is to extend students' understanding of functions and the real numbers, and to increase the tools students have for modeling the real world. They extend their notion of number to include complex numbers and see how the introduction of this set of numbers yields the solutions of polynomial equations and the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra. Students deepen their understanding of the concept of function and apply equation-solving and function concepts to many different types of functions.  The system of polynomial functions, analogous to the integers, is extended to the field of rational functions, which is analogous to the rational numbers.  Students explore the relationship between exponential functions and their inverses, the logarithmic functions. Trigonometric functions are extended to all real numbers, and their graphs and properties are studied.  Finally, students' statistics knowledge is extended to understanding the normal distribution, and they are challenged to make inferences based on sampling, experiments, and observational studies.
2439 Geometry – Common Core The fundamental purpose of the Geometry course is to introduce students to formal geometric proof and the study of plane figures, culminating in the study of right triangle trigonometry and circles. Students begin to prove results about the geometry of the plane formally, by using previously defined terms and notions.  Similarity is explored in greater detail, with an emphasis on discovering trigonometric relationships and solving problems with right triangles.  The correspondence between the plane and the Cartesian coordinate system is explored when students connect algebraic concepts with geometric ones.  Students explore probability concepts and use probability in real-world situations.  The major mathematical ideas in the Geometry course include geometric transformations, proving geometric theorems, congruence and similarity, analytic geometry, right-triangle trigonometry, and probability.
2440 Integrated Mathematics I – Common Core  The fundamental purpose of Mathematics I is to formalize and extend students' understanding of linear functions and their applications. The critical topics of study deepen and extend understanding of linear relationships, in part by contrasting them with exponential phenomena, and in part by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend. Students build on their prior experiences with data, developing more formal means of assessing how a model fits data. Students use regression techniques to describe approximately linear relationships between quantities. They use graphical representations and knowledge of the context to make judgments about the appropriateness of linear models. With linear models, they look at residuals to analyze the goodness of fit. Mathematics I uses properties and theorems involving congruent figures to deepen and extend understanding of geometric knowledge from prior grades.
2441 Integrated Mathematics II – Common Core  The focus of Mathematics II is on quadratic expressions, equations, and functions, and comparing their characteristics and behavior to those of linear and exponential relationships from Mathematics I. The need for extending the set of rational numbers arises and real and complex numbers are introduced. The link between probability and data is explored through conditional probability and counting methods, including their use in making and evaluating decisions. The study of similarity leads to an understanding of right triangle trigonometry and connects to quadratics through Pythagorean relationships. Circles, with their quadratic algebraic representations, round out the course.
2442 Integrated Mathematics III – Common Core  The standards in the integrated Mathematics III course come from the following conceptual categories: Modeling, Functions, Number and Quantity, Algebra, Geometry, and Statistics and Probability.  Students expand their repertoire of functions to include polynomial, rational, and radical functions. Students perform all four operations on polynomials. Students identify zeros of polynomials and make connections between zeros of polynomials and solutions of polynomial equations. They expand their study of right triangle trigonometry to include general triangles. And, finally, students bring together all of their experience with functions and geometry to create models and solve contextual problems.
2443 Integrated Mathematics IV – Common Core  This course provides the opportunity for students to study limits, rates of change, how area relates to integrals, permutations and combinations, mathematical induction, logarithmic functions, composite and inverse functions, periodic functions, vectors, linearizing data, polynomial and rational functions, complex numbers, binomial distributions, space geometry, informatics (the mathematics of databases and search engines, cryptography, error-correcting codes, data compression), problem solving, algorithms, and spreadsheets. The instruction features a problem centered approach that emphasizes the connections between algebra, geometry, statistics and discrete mathematics.
2444 PreCalculus – Common Core  In Precalculus, students extend their work with complex numbers begun in Mathematics III or Algebra II to see that the complex numbers can be represented in the Cartesian plane and that operations with complex numbers have a geometric interpretation.  They connect their understanding of trigonometry and the geometry of the plane to express complex numbers in polar form. Students begin working with vectors.  Students also work with matrices, their operations, and find inverse matrices.  They see the connection between matrices and transformations of the plane.  Students use matrices to represent and solve linear systems. Students extend their work with trigonometric functions, investigating the reciprocal functions secant, cosecant, and cotangent and their graphs and properties.  They find inverse trigonometric functions by appropriately restricting the domains of the standard trigonometric functions and use them to solve problems that arise in modeling contexts. Students add ellipses and hyperbolas to their work.  They also work with polar coordinates and curves defined parametrically and connect these to their other work with trigonometry and complex numbers. Finally, students work with more complicated rational functions, graphing them and determining zeros, y-intercepts, symmetry, asymptotes, intervals for which the function is increasing or decreasing, and maximum or minimum points.
2445 Statistics and Probability – Common Core  Students extend their work in statistics and probability by applying statistics ideas to real-world situations.  They link classroom mathematics and statistics to everyday life, work, and decision-making, by applying these standards in modeling situations. They choose and use appropriate mathematics and statistics to analyze empirical situations, to understand them better, and to improve decisions.

Students in Statistics and Probability take their understanding of probability further by studying expected values, interpreting them as long-term relative means of a random variable.  They use this understanding to make decisions about both probability games and real-life examples using empirical probabilities.
2446 Algebra 1A – Common Core The main purpose of Algebra I is to develop students' fluency with linear, quadratic and exponential functions. The critical areas of instruction involve deepening and extending students' understanding of linear and exponential relationships by contrasting them with each other and by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend. In this first year, content centers on linear equations and functions, linear inequalities, including systems of equations and inequalities.
2447 Algebra 1B - Common Core The main purpose of Algebra I is to develop students' fluency with linear, quadratic and exponential functions. The critical areas of instruction involve deepening and extending students' understanding of linear and exponential relationships by contrasting them with each other and by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend. In the second year of this course, content will center on quadratic and exponential functions. Students will also learn about radical and rational expressions and functions, and statistics and probability.
2450 Computer literacy This introductory course in computers is designed to acquaint the students with techniques for using computers. Students learn key entry skills in order to use simple word processors, mathematical or database applications, and simple graphics programming. When school resources allow, teachers may introduce students to the Internet, where they learn about different search engines, e-mail, and the variety of educational resources on the Internet.
2451 Computer programming This course covers the principles and programming styles used in the design and implementation of contemporary programming languages. Students are introduced to the history of programming languages, language syntax and formal grammars, language processors such as compilers and interpreters, and generalized parsing strategies. The course focuses on particular language constructs and their realization in a variety of programming languages. A particular language such as C, BASIC, or Pascal is used to provide students with practical illustrations of various programming principles.
2453 Computer science A generalized computer course that acquaints students with problem-solving methods, algorithm development, structured programming, and modular system design. Students are taught about abstract data structures, techniques for data manipulation and other fundamental concepts, such as recursion. Computer coding and program structure are often introduced using BASIC or another computer language such as C or Pascal. The course may provide opportunities to apply the learned skills to relevant applications, such as modeling, data management, graphics, and text processing. Students learn about computer organization, from digital logic and microprogramming through machine and assembly language.
2454 Computer lab This course introduces the student, through hands-on operation, to the use of microcomputers. The class may include basic word processing operations, such as terminology and screen formats, text editing, saving and retrieving, and printing text.
2455 Web design This course introduces students to the Internet and World Wide Web. Students will study the history of the Internet, search engines, Web design process, navigation strategies, creation and editing of graphics, Web hosting services, and Web publishing.
2458 Other computer education course This designation is for any computer education course not identified in the series of courses outlined  in the CALPADS Course Group State codes.
2460 IB  Mathematical Studies SL Offered at the subsidiary/standard level only, Mathematical Studies SL is designed to provide a realistic mathematics course for students with varied backgrounds and abilities who may not study mathematics at the university level. The course develops the skills needed to cope with the mathematical demands of a technological society with an emphasis on the application of mathematics to real-life, everyday situations. Course topics include: linear, quadratic, and exponential functions; approximation and error; algorithms; probability and statistics; sets and logic; simple sequences and finance; linear programming; vectors; matrices; and trigonometry. Before entering the course, students should have a good understanding of basic arithmetic, algebra, geometry, and trigonometry. A personal research project involving the collection, analysis and evaluation of data is a requirement of the course.
2461 IB Mathematics SL Offered at the subsidiary/standard level only, Mathematics SL is designed to provide a background of mathematical thought and a reasonable level of technical ability to students who will continue to study mathematics at the university level. Course topics include: logarithms; sequences and series; linear and quadratic functions and equations; the binomial theorem; arcs and sectors; trigonometry; functions and calculus; vectors and matrices; and probability and statistics. Students must also complete one of two optional topics: analytical geometry and further calculus; or further probability and statistics. Before entering the course, students should have a good understanding of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and statistics.
2462 IB  Mathematics higher level Offered at the higher level only, Mathematics HL is designed for those students who have a good background and genuine interest in mathematics and who enjoy meeting its challenges and problems, and for those who will continue to study mathematics or engineering at university level. Course topics include: sequences and series; counting and proof; trigonometry; complex numbers; discrete and continuous probability distributions; functions, differentiation, integration, and differential equations; and matrices and vectors. Students must also complete one of four optional topics: abstract algebra; graphs and trees; statistics; or analysis and approximation. Before entering the course, students should have a strong understanding of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and statistics.
2463 IB Further Mathematics HL Offered at the subsidiary/standard level only, Further Mathematics HL is designed for students who intend to specialize in mathematics at the university level and requires a high degree of competence and interest in the subject. Advanced Mathematics allows students to gain an increased exposure to, and deeper understanding of, mathematical concepts and methods. Course topics include: abstract algebra; graphs and trees; statistics; analysis and approximation; logic; sets; relations; the real number system; primes; concepts and methods of proof; recurrence relations; and sequences. Before entering the course, students should have completed or be enrolled in Mathematics HL.
2464 MYP Coordinated Program of Math (CPM) MYP Mathematics promotes an understanding of how cultural, societal and historical influences from a variety of cultures have shaped mathematical thought. Students learn to understand and discuss the international nature of mathematics. Schools are required to develop schemes of work according to a framework that includes five branches of mathematics: number, algebra, geometry and trigonometry, statistics and probability, and discrete mathematics. Objectives include understanding mathematical reasoning and processes, the ability to apply mathematics and to evaluate the significance of the results, the ability to develop flexible strategies for problems in which solutions are not obvious, and the acquisition of mathematical intuition.
2465 IB  Computer science Offered at two levels, Computer Science explores the operation of computer systems and the principle underlying problem solving by using computers. In addition to problem solving and programming, students study the structure and design of computer architecture; data representation and logic; and the connecting processes involving operating systems, interfacing, and networking. At both levels, the course demands both logical discipline and imaginative creativity in the selection and design of algorithms and in the writing, testing, and debugging of programs using a high level, block structured language.
2466 IB  Information technology in a global society Offered at the subsidiary/standard level only, Information Technology in a Global Society (ITGS) examines the interaction between information, technology, and society. The course is designed to help students develop a systematic, problem solving approach to processing and analyzing information using a range of information tools. The impact of modern information technology on individuals, on relationships between people, and on institutions and societies is also discussed and evaluated. The course focuses on six themes: individuals and machines (comparisons and interactions); information systems in today's society; the system life cycle (problem solving); responsible use of information tools; the social impacts of information technology; and evolution from the past and insight into the future.
2467 MYP Algebra (I or II) MYP Mathematics promotes an understanding of how cultural, societal and historical influences from a variety of cultures have shaped mathematical thought. Students learn to understand and discuss the international nature of mathematics. Schools are required to develop schemes of work according to a framework that includes five branches of mathematics: number, algebra, geometry and trigonometry, statistics and probability, and discrete mathematics. Objectives include understanding mathematical reasoning and processes, the ability to apply mathematics and to evaluate the significance of the results, the ability to develop flexible strategies for problems in which solutions are not obvious, and the acquisition of mathematical intuition.
2468 MYP Geometry and/or Trigonometry MYP Mathematics promotes an understanding of how cultural, societal and historical influences from a variety of cultures have shaped mathematical thought. Students learn to understand and discuss the international nature of mathematics. Schools are required to develop schemes of work according to a framework that includes five branches of mathematics: number, algebra, geometry and trigonometry, statistics and probability, and discrete mathematics. Objectives include understanding mathematical reasoning and processes, the ability to apply mathematics and to evaluate the significance of the results, the ability to develop flexible strategies for problems in which solutions are not obvious, and the acquisition of mathematical intuition.
2469 MYP Integrated Math Program MYP Mathematics promotes an understanding of how cultural, societal and historical influences from a variety of cultures have shaped mathematical thought. Students learn to understand and discuss the international nature of mathematics. Schools are required to develop schemes of work according to a framework that includes five branches of mathematics: number, algebra, geometry and trigonometry, statistics and probability, and discrete mathematics. Objectives include understanding mathematical reasoning and processes, the ability to apply mathematics and to evaluate the significance of the results, the ability to develop flexible strategies for problems in which solutions are not obvious, and the acquisition of mathematical intuition.
2470 AP  Computer science A Computer Science A emphasizes object oriented programming methodology with a concentration on problem solving and algorithm development and is meant to be the equivalent of a first semester college level course in Computer Science. It also includes the study of data structures, design, and abstraction, but these topics are not covered to the extent that they are in Computer Science AB.
2471 AP  Computer science AB Computer Science AB includes all the topics of Computer Science A, as well as a more formal and in depth study of algorithms, data structures, design, and abstraction.
2472 AP Computer Science Principles The AP Computer Science Principles course is designed to be equivalent to a first-semester introductory college computing course. In this course, students will develop computational thinking vital for success across all disciplines, such as using computational tools to analyze and study data and working with large data sets to analyze, visualize, and draw conclusions from trends. The course is unique in its focus on fostering student creativity. Students are encouraged to apply creative processes when developing computational artifacts and to think creatively while using simulations to explore questions that interest them. They will also develop effective communication and collaboration skills, working individually and collaboratively to solve problems, and discussing and writing about the importance of these problems and the impacts to their community, society, and the world.
2473 MYP Algebra II MYP Mathematics promotes an understanding of how cultural, societal and historical influences from a variety of cultures have shaped mathematical thought. Students learn to understand and discuss the international nature of mathematics. Schools are required to develop schemes of work according to a framework that includes five branches of mathematics: number, algebra, geometry and trigonometry, statistics and probability, and discrete mathematics. Objectives include understanding mathematical reasoning and processes, the ability to apply mathematics and to evaluate the significance of the results, the ability to develop flexible strategies for problems in which solutions are not obvious, and the acquisition of mathematical intuition.
2479 MYP Computer Technology MYP Computer Technology aims at establishing the foundations for technological literacy and know-how and providing a balance among three key areas: systems, information, and materials. The course allows students to display ingenuity and creativity and to devise practical solutions to given tasks by following the design cycle of investigation, planning, creation and evaluation. This subject area offers great potential for reinforcing and integrating skills learned in other disciplines, especially in the presentation and handling of data and the processes involved in the design and manufacture of a product.
2480 AP  Calculus AB Following the College Board's suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level calculus courses, AP Calculus AB provides students with an understanding of the concepts of calculus and experience with its methods and applications. These courses introduce calculus and include the following topics: functions, graphs, limits, and continuity; differential calculus (including definition, application, and computation of the derivative; derivative at a point; derivative as a function; and second derivatives); and integral calculus (including definite integrals and antidifferentiation).
2481 AP  Calculus BC Following the College Board's suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level calculus courses, AP Calculus BC courses provide students with an understanding of the concepts of calculus and experience with its methods and applications. These courses cover all of the calculus topics in AP Calculus AB as well as the following topics: parametric, polar, and vector functions; applications of integrals; and polynomial approximations and series, including series of constants and Taylor series.  
2483 AP Statistics Following the College Board's suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level statistics courses, AP Statistics courses introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: exploring data, sampling and experimentation, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference.
2484 Mathematical Modeling This course is an introduction to mathematical modeling using graphical, numerical, symbolic, and verbal techniques to describe and explore real-world data and phenomena. Emphasis is on the use of elementary functions to investigate and analyze applied problems and questions, supported by the use of appropriate technology, and on effective communication of quantitative concepts and results.
2485 Financial Algebra Financial Algebra uses practical business problems and real world personal financial issues to explore areas of mathematics that help us understand, predict, and control our financial world. Topics such as investments, the stock market, business start-ups, banking, credit cards, insurance, income taxes, business planning, home buying, and budgeting are the major areas of finance included in the course. Students explore and master mathematical concepts and skills such as data analysis, fitting data to equations, linear, quadratic, exponential, and piecewise models, interest formulas, and present and future value. Students model problems using a variety of functions and justify process and results. Problem solving and communication of results are emphasized.
2490 Dual Enrollment College Course - Mathematics A college mathematics course taken by a student in which the student earns college credit. This course may also count toward the high school graduation requirements (i.e., the student receives both college credit and high school credit).  This is not an Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) course (AP and IB courses have their own Course Group State Codes).
2498 Other mathematics course This assignment code covers any mathematics course not identified in the series of courses outlined in the CALPADS Course Group State Codes.
2503 Adapted Physical Education This course is designed to meet the unique needs of an individual with a disability who is unable to fully participate in the general physical education program. Students have an IEP to qualify for this course and the course is taught by a credentialed adapted physical education specialist
2505 Leadership/Military science Students participate in a physical conditioning program aimed at promoting military values and military precision in group activities, such as rifle corps or marching squad. For secondary students, this course also brings together information from other subject areas, and relates these skills and knowledge to a military setting. Examples include engine mechanics, electricity or electronics, and aviation technique.
2506 Elective Physical Education Adventure/Outdoor Activities An elective physical education course for students who have completed High School Physical Education Courses I and II, this course includes content for developing skills and knowledge in adventure/outdoor activities (rock climbing, kayaking, etc.)
2507 Elective Physical Education Aerobic Activities An elective physical education course for students who have completed High School Physical Education Courses I and II, this course includes content for developing skills and knowledge in aerobic activities (running, cycling, rowing, cross-country skiing, triathlon, swimming, skating, etc.)
2508 Elective Physical Education Aquatic Activities An elective physical education course for students who have completed High School Physical Education Courses I and II, this course includes content for developing skills and knowledge in aquatic activities (diving, snorkeling, life guarding, SCUBA, synchronized swimming, water polo, etc.)
2509 Elective Physical Education Dance (physical education standards) An elective physical education course for students who have completed High School Physical Education Courses I and II, this course includes content for developing skills and knowledge in dance (ballet, folk, jazz, modern, social, square). The content in this course is based on the physical education content standards.
2510 Elective Physical Education Individual and Dual Activities An elective physical education course for students who have completed High School Physical Education Courses I and II, this course includes content for developing skills and knowledge in individual and dual activities (archery, golf, surfing, yoga, badminton, handball, squash, tennis, etc.)
2511 Elective Physical Education Interscholastic Athletics An elective physical education course for students who have completed High School Physical Education Courses I and II, this course includes content for developing advanced skills and knowledge for participation in school sponsored interscholastic athletic activities and teams.
2512 Elective Physical Education Other An elective physical education course for students who have completed High School Physical Education Courses I and II, this course may specialize in one or more specific areas of physical education content (aquatics, rhythms/dance, individual/dual activities, gymnastic/tumbling, combatives, team sports). Emphasis is on developing advanced skills and knowledge and includes application of the principles of motor learning, biomechanics, exercise physiology, psychology and sociology.
2513 Elective Physical Education Weight Training and Fitness An elective physical education course for students who have completed High School Physical Education Courses I and II, this course includes content for developing skills and knowledge in weight training and fitness.
2514 High School Physical Education I This course is the first year of the high school physical education sequence. It includes the required content areas; aquatics, rhythms/dance, individual and dual activities, mechanics of body movement, and the effects of physical activity on dynamic health.
2515 High School Physical Education II This course is the second year of the high school foundation courses, it expands the content of course I and includes the remainder of the required content areas; gymnastics/tumbling, combatives, team sports, mechanics of body movement, and the effects of physical activity on dynamic health.
2516 Modified or Specially Designed Physical Education This course is designed to provide specially designed instruction in physical education meeting the unique needs of children with disabilities who have an IEP.
2517 Physical Education K-8 A general physical education course for grades kindergarten through eight (excluding students receiving Adapted or Modified/Specially Designed physical education).
2518 Physical Education—Independent Study Students participate in physical education taken through independent study, often conducted with instructors as mentors. This enable students to explore topics of interest related to physical education. Independent Study physical education courses may serve as an opportunity for students to expand their expertise in a particular sport or activity, to explore a topic in greater detail, or to develop more advanced skills.
2519 Off-Campus Sports Off-Campus Sports courses award physical education credit for off-campus sports activities (e.g., swimming, weight training, or any individual or team sports) taken at a community center or other location off the school campus.
2535 Health education This course provides students with knowledge and skills related to one or more of the nine content areas of health education, as defined in the Health Framework: (1) nutrition; (2) prevention of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs; (3) personal health; (4) injury prevention and safety; (5) individual growth and development; (6) consumer and community health; (7) environmental health; (8) communicable and chronic diseases; and (9) family life. Family life education promotes the development of positive family interactions and may include human sexuality, dating, relationships, and prevention of sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV. This course provides students with content and skills that enable them to apply specific knowledge in their own personal behaviors and environments. This course builds the skills students need to recognize and resist negative influences. It includes decision-making, goal setting, communication, and interpersonal skills.
2536 Peer counseling/conflict management This class is designed to provide students with skills in conflict resolution. Students learn to mediate disagreements through nonviolent means. Students develop an awareness of differences that may arise from a student body that is racially or culturally diverse. Students learn the importance of a neutral third party who can assist in negotiating a solution to any potential conflict.
2537 Life skills Life Skills is designed to increase student knowledge and ability in skills necessary for everyday living. The course emphasizes defining personal values, goal-setting and planning, making decisions and solving problems, evaluating information and dealing with media and peer pressure, communication and relationships, decision making, wellness and personal safety, and contributing to your community.
2538 Other health education course (not incl in 2535) This designation is for any health education course not identified in the series of courses outlined  in the CALPADS Course Group State codes.
2545 Driver education This course is designed to teach students correct driving skills, rules of the road, traffic procedures, safe driving procedures and practices, legal obligations and responsibilities, and the physical and mental factors (including alcohol and other drugs) affecting the driver's capability.
2546 Driver training This course is designed to teach students driving skills for operating an automobile. Students learn to drive under different driving conditions. The course emphasizes safe driving strategies and practices.
2548 Other safety education course This designation is for any safety education course not identified in the series of courses outlined  in the CALPADS Course Group State codes.
2560 MYP Physical Education MYP Physical Education aims to facilitate physical, intellectual, emotional, and social development. The program intends to cultivate a healthy and active lifestyle for students and consequently advocates activities which are not only enjoyable but also contribute to healthy living. Students are helped to develop the motor skills necessary to enable them to participate successfully in a variety of physical activities, and learn the benefits of a regular exercise regime.
2600 Astronomy Astronomy is an introduction to the solar system and general astronomical concepts. The course may include extensive observations and descriptions of the night sky. Students develop the ability to compare and contrast stars, planets, and other objects in space and the way they move. Students learn the names of major constellations, develop familiarity with radio astronomy, and astronomical measuring instruments, and techniques. This class may also explore the evolution of the universe.
2601 Aerospace education This course explores the connection between meteorology, astronomy, and flight across and around the earth as well as into outer space. In addition to principles of meteorology (e.g., atmosphere, pressures, winds and jet streams) and astronomical concepts (e.g., solar system, stars, and interplanetary bodies), course topics typically include the history of aviation, principles of aeronautical decision making, airplane systems, aerodynamics, and flight theory.
2602 Aviation education Aviation education acquaints students with federal aviation regulations, meteorology, navigation, aeronautical design and construction, operation and use of an aircraft, and airport operations. The course emphasizes career opportunities in aviation.
2603 Biology This laboratory course explores the origins, organization, reproduction, genetics, growth, development, evolution, behavior, and interdependence of living things. This course also includes cellular structure and function, general plant and animal physiology, and taxonomy.
2604 Advanced biology Usually taken after a comprehensive initial study of biology, Biology—Advanced Studies courses cover biological systems in more detail. Topics that may be explored include cell organization, function, and reproduction; energy transformation; human anatomy and physiology; and the evolution and adaptation of organisms.
2605 Botany This practical oriented course provides the student with an understanding of plants, their life cycles, and evolutionary relationships. The course develops in students an appreciation for living things.
2606 Zoology This survey course provides the student with an introductory under standing of animals, and the niche they occupy in their habitat, their life cycles, and evolutionary relationships to each other. The course also develops an awareness and understanding of biotic communities and to sharpen laboratory and field skills.
2607 Chemistry This introductory course covers the basic topics of chemical bonds, periodicity, kinetic molecular theory, kinetics, energies, dynamic equilibrium, conservation laws, atomic and molecular theory, and chemical systems. The course usually includes applications of chemical principles.
2608 Advanced chemistry Usually taken after a comprehensive initial study of chemistry, Chemistry—Advanced Studies courses cover chemical properties and interactions in more detail. Advanced chemistry topics include organic chemistry, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, macromolecules, kinetic theory, and nuclear chemistry.
2609 Oceanography A course designed for students seeking a greater knowledge of the sea. Laboratory experiences and field work are important parts of the course. Students investigate both physical and biological aspects of the ocean.
2610 Physical science This course covers the structure and state of matter. Topics may include forms of energy, wave phenomenon, electromagnetism, and physical/chemical interactions.
2611 General science This course combines more than one branch of science into a cohesive study where students explore general scientific concepts. Topics covered include the principles underlying the scientific method and the techniques of experimentation.
2612 Environmental studies This course uses an interdisciplinary approach to examine the interrelationship between organisms and their physical environment. Students gain an awareness and understanding about ecological concepts and current environmental issues regarding air quality, water resources, energy resources, integrated water management, and human and natural communities.
2613 Physics The first course in physics with mathematical reasoning not exceeding the level of trigonometry. The course uses the concept of vectors. Physics concepts usually include conservation laws, motion, gravity, optics, energy, kinetic theory, fields and interactions, and atomic structure.
2614 Advanced physics Usually taken after a comprehensive initial study of physics, Physics—Advanced Studies courses provide instruction in laws of conservation, thermodynamics, and kinetics; wave and particle phenomena; electromagnetic fields; and fluid dynamics.
2617 Conservation Conservation is a course of study that uses a variety of disciplines such as biology, history, and physical science to show students the relevance of conserving environmental habitats. Students learn the importance to our cultural heritage of safeguarding individual objects, structures, sites, or monuments that have significant artistic, historic, scientific, or religious value.
2618 Earth science This course covers the fundamental topics associated with the formation and changes in the earth's crust, meteorology, astronomy, paleontology, materials of the earth, earth cycles, history of the earth, and earth in space. Geoscience is another name used to identify the course.
2619 Energy education This course focuses on one or several aspects of energy or power in transportation and work. The course content may include various sources of energy, mechanisms for energy transfer, such as electricity and heat, energy production through wind/nuclear solar energies, and energy conversion by means of motors and engines. This course may also include the use of energy as it relates to society and the environment.
2620 Geology Geology is an in-depth study of the forces that form and continue to affect the earth's crust. Topics may include the structure and development of the earth's crust, the composition of the earth's interior, rock types, and the forms of life found in fossil and plate tectonics. The course covers earthquakes, volcanoes, glaciation, and erosion in the context of a changing earth.
2621 Life science Life Science provides students with a basic understanding of living things. The course applies the principles of conservation to show the interrelationships of organisms within ecosystems.
2622 Meteorology Meteorology covers the properties of the atmosphere. Topics include atmospheric layering, changing pressure, winds, water vapor, air masses, fronts, temperature changes, and weather forecasting.
2624 Science projects This course assists advanced science students with the individual study, research, and development of a science project.
2625 Space science This course is an introduction to space flight and the aerospace industry. Topics may include astronomy, orbits, propulsion systems, space flight, biology, communication technology, history of flight, NASA, exploration, and satellite programs. The course may also include simulated flight and field trips.
2626 Coordinated/integrated science I First-Year Coordinated/Integrated Science draws from the principles of several scientific disciplines - earth science, biology, chemistry, and physics - and organizes the material around thematic units. Common themes include systems, models, energy, patterns, stability and change. Students investigate applications of the theme using appropriate aspects from each discipline.
2627 Coordinated/integrated science II Second-Year Coordinated/Integrated Science draws from the principles of several scientific disciplines - earth science, biology, chemistry, and physics - and organizes the material around thematic units. Common themes include systems, models, energy, patterns, stability and change. Students investigate applications of the theme using appropriate aspects from each discipline. This course builds on the content learned in First-Year Coordinated/Integrated Science, addressing additional concepts in Coordinated/Integrated Science or previous concepts at a more advanced academic level.
2628 Coordinated/integrated science III Third-Year Coordinated/Integrated Science draws from the principles of several scientific disciplines - earth science, biology, chemistry, and physics - and organizes the material around thematic units. Common themes include systems, models, energy, patterns, stability and change. Students investigate applications of the theme using appropriate aspects from each discipline. This course builds on the content learned in Second-Year Coordinated/Integrated Science, addressing additional concepts in Coordinated/Integrated Science or previous concepts at a more advanced academic level.
2629 Coordinated/integrated science IV Fourth-Year Coordinated/Integrated Science draws from the principles of several scientific disciplines - earth science, biology, chemistry, and physics - and organizes the material around thematic units. Common themes include systems, models, energy, patterns, change, and constancy. Students investigate applications of the theme using appropriate aspects from each discipline. This course builds on the content learned in Third-Year Coordinated/Integrated Science, addressing additional concepts in Coordinated/Integrated Science or previous concepts at a more advanced academic level.
2633 Pacesetter science The College Board designed this course as a capstone course for the 12th grade. It is appropriate for students who have taken coordinated, integrated or discipline specific science courses. This course requires specific prerequisite courses, including at least two years of college preparatory science in the first three years of high school.
2635 Conceptual chemistry This is a practical, non-quantitative chemistry course designed for students who desire an understanding of chemical concepts and applications.
2636 Conceptual physics Conceptual Physics is a first course in Physics with mathematical reasoning not exceeding the level of Algebra I. The concepts usually include conservation laws, motion, gravity, waves, optics and atomic structure. The course may include applications to technology.
2652 Gen science with focus on earth sci (gd 6 stan) This course emphasizes the study of earth science providing students with an introduction to the Earth's history and the mechanisms that account for the planet's topography, weather phenomena, and interactions of living things within the Earth's system. The course focuses on learning how two sources of energy (the Sun and the radioactive decay inside the Earth) power convection currents that cause weather, the reshaping of the Earth's surface, and the continuation of ecosystems. Through the investigation and experimentation standards, students learn and apply the scientific methods, interpret maps, interpret events by sequence and time, and identify changes in natural phenomena.
2653 Gen science with focus on life sci (gd 7 stan) This course focuses on life science with the study of cells, body systems, and genetics and the history of life on Earth. Examination of the evolution of life through the geologic history learned in grade six receives considerable emphasis. The physical science principles that underlie biological structures and functions (e.g., light, levers, blood pressure) are studied to gain a deeper understanding of living systems. Through the investigation and experimentation standards, students learn how to use appropriate tools and technology and a variety of print and electronic resources, communicate ideals logically, construct scale models and diagrams to communicate knowledge, and communicate the steps and results from investigations.
2654 Gen science with focus on phys sci (gd 8 stan) This course focuses on topics in chemistry and physics. The topics in chemistry focus on the structures of matter, behavior of atoms and molecules and the chemical makeup of living systems. Physics topics focus on motion, forces, and density and buoyancy that are explored as aspects of the behavior of matter. The Earth and the solar system are studied according to the physical interactions of bodies in space. Through the investigation and experimentation standards, students learn how to plan and conduct a scientific investigation, evaluate data, distinguish between variables and controls, construct linear graphs, and manipulate simple mathematical formulas.
2655 Anatomy and Physiology Usually taken after a comprehensive initial study of biology, Anatomy and Physiology courses present the human body and biological systems in more detail. In order to understand the structure of the human body and its functions, students learn anatomical terminology, study cells and tissues, explore functional systems (skeletal, muscular, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, reproductive, nervous, and so on), and may dissect mammals.
2660 IB Biology IB Biology courses prepare students to take the International Baccalaureate Biology exams at either the standard or higher level. In keeping with the general aim of IB Experimental Sciences courses, IB Biology promotes understanding of the facts, principles, and concepts underlying the biological field; critical analysis, evaluation, and generation of scientific information and hypotheses; improved ability to communicate scientific ideas; and an awareness of the impact of biology and scientific advances in biology upon both society and issues of ethical, philosophical, and political importance. The syllabus is organized around four central themes: structure and function; universality versus diversity; equilibrium within systems; and evolution. Course topics at both levels include cells, chemistry of life, genetics, ecology, and human health and physiology. Laboratory experimentation is an essential component of these courses.
2661 IB Chemistry IB Chemistry courses prepare students to take the International Baccalaureate Chemistry exams at either the standard or higher level. In keeping with the general aim of IB Experimental Sciences courses, IB Chemistry promotes understanding of the facts, patterns, and principles underlying the field of chemistry; critical analysis, evaluation, prediction, and generation of scientific information and hypotheses; improved ability to communicate scientific ideas; and an awareness of the impact of chemistry and scientific advances in chemistry upon both society and issues of ethical, philosophical, and political importance. Chemistry is designed to meet the needs of students who want to study science at the university level and who will complete their formal study of science at the end of the course. Course topics at both levels include stoichiometry, atomic theory, periodicity, bonding, states of matter, energetics, kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, oxidation and reduction, and organic chemistry. Laboratory experimentation is an essential part of these courses.
2662 IB Physics IB Physics courses prepare students to take the International Baccalaureate Physics exams at either the standard or higher level. In keeping with the general aim of IB Experimental Sciences courses, IB Physics promotes understanding of the facts, patterns, and principles underlying the field of physics; critical analysis, prediction, and application of scientific information and hypotheses; improved ability to communicate scientific ideas; and an awareness of the impact of scientific advances in physics upon both society and issues of ethical, philosophical, and political importance. Course topics at both levels include measurement, mechanics, thermal physics and properties of matter, waves, electricity and magnetism, and atomic and nuclear physics.Laboratory experimentation is essential; calculus may be used in some courses.
2664 IB Environmental systems IB Environmental Systems courses prepare students to take the International Baccalaureate Environmental Systems exam at the standard level by providing students with a coherent perspective on the environment that is essentially scientific and above all enables them to adopt an informed and responsible stance on the wide range of environmental issues they will inevitably come to face. The course leads students to an appreciation of the nature and value of internationalism. Course topics include systems and models, the ecosystem, global cycles and physical systems, and human population and carrying capacity.
2665 MYP Science (biology, chemistry, or physics) MYP Science aims to provide the student with both a body of knowledge and an understanding of the scientific approach to problem solving. This dual role makes science an important means to investigate and understand the natural world. The ability to formulate hypotheses, design and carry out strategies to test them, and evaluate results, constitutes the framework within which specific content is presented. Among other skills, the student is expected to use basic laboratory equipment safely and efficiently, to measure and make sensible estimates, and to classify things logically. Within MYP Sciences are the traditional subjects of biology, chemistry, and physics, as well as topics, concepts and issues from other branches of science, such as earth and health sciences.
2666 IB Design technology IB Design Technology courses prepare students to take the International Baccalaureate Design Technology exams at either the standard or higher level. Design Technology is designed to teach students how to adapt to new experiences and approach problems with the appropriate skills and techniques to identify the problem's important elements and to develop optimum solutions. It assumes no previous experience in either design technology or designing. Course topics at both levels include designers and the design cycle, the responsibility of the designer, materials, manufacturing processes, and techniques, production systems, processing and control systems, and project design in action.
2667 MYP IB Design Technology (IB Middle Years Prog) MYP Design Technology aims at establishing the foundations for technological literacy and know-how and providing a balance among three key areas: systems, information, and materials. The course allows students to display ingenuity and creativity and to devise practical solutions to given tasks by following the design cycle of investigation, planning, creation and evaluation. This subject area offers great potential for reinforcing and integrating skills learned in other disciplines, especially in the presentation and handling of data and the processes involved in the design and manufacture of a product.
2668 IB Sports Exercise and Health Science The IB DP course in sports, exercise and health science standard level (SL) involves the study of the science that underpins physical performance. The course incorporates the traditional disciplines of anatomy and physiology, biomechanics, psychology and nutrition. Students cover a range of topics and carry out practical (experimental) investigations in both laboratory and field settings. This provides an opportunity to acquire then knowledge and understanding necessary to apply scientific principles and critically analyze human performance. Where relevant, the course will address issues of international dimensions and ethics by considering sport, exercise and health relative to the individual in a global context.
2670 AP Biology Adhering to the curricula recommended by the College Board and designed to parallel college-level introductory biology courses, AP Biology courses emphasize four general concepts: evolution; cellular processes (energy and communication); genetics and information transfer; and interactions of biological systems. For each concept, these courses emphasize the development of scientific inquiry and reasoning skills, such as designing a plan for collecting data, analyzing data, applying mathematical routines, and connecting concepts in and across domains. AP Biology courses include college-level laboratory investigations.
2671 AP Chemistry Following the curricula recommended by the College Board, AP Chemistry courses usually follow high school chemistry and second-year algebra. Concepts covered may include the structure of matter; bonding of intermolecular forces; chemical reactions; kinetics; thermodynamics; and chemical equilibrium. For each concept, these courses emphasize the development of scientific inquiry and reasoning skills, such as designing a plan for collecting data, analyzing data, applying mathematical routines, and connecting concepts in and across domains. AP Chemistry courses include college-level laboratory investigations.
2673 AP Physics C AP Physics C courses prepare students for the College Board’s examinations in Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism and Physics C: Mechanics. These courses parallel college-level physics courses that serve as a partial foundation for science or engineering majors and primarily focus on mechanics and electricity and magnetism, with approximately equal emphasis placed on these two areas. See SCED Codes 03163 and 03164 for detailed content descriptions.
2674 AP Environmental Science AP Environmental Science courses are designed by the College Board to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, identify and analyze environmental problems (both natural and human made), evaluate the relative risks associated with the problems, and examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. Topics covered include science as a process, ecological processes and energy conversions, earth as an interconnected system, the impact of humans on natural systems, cultural and societal contexts of environmental problems, and the development of practices that will ensure sustainable systems.
2675 AP Physics 1:  Algebra-based AP Physics 1 is an algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course. Students cultivate their understanding of Physics through inquiry-based investigations as they explore topics such as Newtonian mechanics (including rotational motion); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound; and introductory, simple circuits. This course may also include college-level laboratory investigations.
2676 AP Physics 2: Algebra-based AP Physics 2 is an algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course. Students cultivate their understanding of Physics through inquiry-based investigations as they explore topics such as fluid statics and dynamics; thermodynamics with kinetic theory; PV diagrams and probability; electrostatics; electrical circuits with capacitors; magnetic fields; electromagnetism; physical and geometric optics; and quantum, atomic, and nuclear physics. This course may also include college-level laboratory investigations.
2690 Dual Enrollment College Course - Science A college science course taken by a student in which the student earns college credit. This course may also count toward the high school graduation requirements (i.e., the student receives both college credit and high school credit).  This is not an Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) course (AP and IB courses have their own Course Group State Codes).
2698 Other science course Any science course not identified in the series of courses outlined  in the CALPADS Course Group State Codes.
2700 Anthropology Students learn about human beings and their cultures by studying the two major divisions of anthropology: physical and cultural. In physical anthropology students consider the biological characteristics of human beings, their adaptation to their environment, and development in the context of various forms of animal life. In cultural anthropology students learn about the culture of specific peoples, past and present, as well as those components of culture found universally among human societies.
2701 Economics In this course students deepen their understanding of the basic economic problems and institutions of the nation and world in which they live. They learn to make reasoned decisions on economic issues as citizens, workers, consumers, business owners and managers, and members of civic groups. This course enriches students' understanding of the operation and institutions of economic systems. Topics include Fundamental Economic Concepts, Comparative Economic Systems, Microeconomics, Macroeconomics, and International Economic Concepts.
2702 Physical geography This course develops the basic themes of physical geography, including a systematic discussion of the physical landscape through geomorphology and topography; the patterns and processes of climate and weather; and water resources. These studies equip students with an understanding of the constraints and possibilities that the physical environment places on human development. The course covers natural resources and place-name geography.
2703 Principles of Am. democracy/govnt and civics Students apply knowledge gained in previous years of study to pursue a deeper understanding of the institutions of American government. They draw on their studies of American history and of other societies in the world today. This course prepares students to vote, to reflect on the responsibilities of citizenship, and to participate in community activities. Topics include the Constitution and the Bill of Rights; the Courts and the Governmental Process; Our Government Today; the Legislative and Executive Branches; Federalism; and State and Local Government. Contemporary issues, including key passages from the Federalist Papers and similar primary sources are studied in light of democratic principles.
2705 International studies This course is a study of the world system of nation-states and their relationship and relationships between social and political systems, with a special emphasis on diplomatic relations and the factors affecting the development of U.S. foreign policy.
2706 Comparative political systems This course is one in which students learn about the difference between democratic and non democratic political systems. The key topics discussed include the nature of leadership, the institutional setting, allocation and use of power, decision making, the role of the individual citizen, and political and social ideology.
2707 Current events This course is one in which students identify, research, analyze, and discuss contemporary social, economic, and political issues and events from the different points of views identified in the United States and the world. The course covers the global context of issues, as well as their importance in local, state, or national affairs. Ideally, students study the topics in their historical context, thereby making connections from past to present. Students present their positions on the issues.
2708 California history This course emphasizes the study of California, including the people and its history, its geography, its multicultural heritage, its government and economy, the major issues and unresolved problems facing the state, and the ways in which students can become active participants in local and state government and community service organizations.
2709 United States history This course focuses on the examination of major turning points in American history in the twentieth century. The course emphasizes specific themes, such as the expanding role of the federal government and federal courts; the continuing tension between the individual and the state and between minority rights and majority power; the emergence of a modern corporate economy; the impact of technology on American society and culture; change in the ethnic composition of American society; the movements toward equal rights for racial minorities and women; and the role of the United States as a major world power.
2710 Ethnic studies This course focuses on an in-depth study of one or more ethnic groups, including their history, culture, achievements, contributions, barriers and strategies to overcome these barriers, and status in the United States. Students learn about the characteristics of America's ethnic groups and the similarities and differences of these groups in both their past and present experiences from multiple perspectives. Students learn that Americans, as descendants of many cultures, races, religions, and ethnic groups are bonded by a democratic vision of liberty, equality, and justice.
2711 World history: survey This course provides an overview of the history of human society from early civilization to the contemporary period, examining political, economic, social, religious, military, scientific, and cultural developments. Students study cultures of the western and nonwestern world. The course integrates geography with history and cultural studies.
2712 Other history, culture, geography: survey This designation is for any history course not identified in the series of courses outlined  in the CALPADS Course Group State codes.
2713 Philosophy Philosophy familiarizes students with the terminology, problems, major philosophers, and systems that pertain to this field. The course deals with major questions in the fields of epistemology, axiology, aesthetics, logic, and metaphysics. Students discuss, explore, and evaluate important philosophical systems, such as materialism, idealism, naturalism, mysticism, pragmatism, institutionalism, realism, and existentialism. The course emphasizes the field of ethics where moral questions are analyzed in literature, history, and contemporary events.
2714 Psychology This course focuses on the scientific study of human development, learning, motivation, and personality. Students explore implications for everyday life with a scientific perspective on human behavior.
2715 Sociology This course introduces students to sociological concepts, theories, and procedures. Students learn how sociologists analyze the basic structures and functions of societies and of groups within societies, discover how these societies became organized, identify the conditions under which they become disorganized, and predict the conditions for their reorganization. Typical study units for this course include such social issues as crime, poverty, and the problem of discrimination toward women, children, the disabled, the aged, and minorities.
2719 Student government This course explores the practice of small group government in a school setting.
2722 Career education A course where students are introduced to the world of career exploration, with emphasis on techniques for filling out job applications, interviewing techniques, preparation of a resume, communication and stress management skills.
2724 World regional geography This course provides an understanding of the distribution and characteristics of the world's major cultures and of the dynamics of human migration and cultural diffusion. Topics include basic physical geography, map reading, and studies of various regions of the world. The course emphasizes the traditional and contemporary roles of foreign nations in the growth of American culture.
2726 Comparative world religions Students consider the principal religions of the world that are active today and deal with basic questions: What does humankind believe and what does it worship? In what ways do we worship? What are our understandings of the ethical life? What are the influences of contemporary times and cultures? The course introduces students to the basic tenets of Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism.
2728 World cultures This course focuses on an investigation of one or more cultures in a geographic region of the world today; for example, cultural studies of Africa, the Middle East, Latin America, Asia, or Southeast Asia. The course covers geographic settings; the population, the stature and roles of women and minority groups; and processes of cultural change and exchange. Students learn about the culture's historical, economic, and political developments, including nation building across time. The course may include an in-depth study of one or more different cultures to expand the students' understanding of cultural diversity and provide balance in the representation of ethnic groups and societies around the world.
2730 Women's history This course includes the study of the history of American women in which students analyze the place of women in history. Students study the complexities of women's changing roles, including women as immigrants and as settlers, women in the formation of the nation, women's work and the response to industrialization, the awakening women's movement in America and its impact on women of color, the American feminist revolution, and creative endeavors of women in the past and present.
2732 Law-related education Students gain a practical understanding of the law and the legal system developed under the United States Constitution and Bill of Rights. They become aware of the current issues and controversies relating to law and the legal system and the mechanisms created to deal with new problems and inequities. Students are encouraged to participate as citizens in the legal system. The course includes a study of concepts underlying the law, as well as an introduction to the origin and development of our legal system, including civil and criminal law.
2734 History-social science (any of grades K-8) This course is normally taught by the regular classroom teacher; however, this course listing is for a teacher specialist teaching one or more classes in history-social science. The topics by grade levels are as follows: kindergarten ∙ topics related to learning and working now and in past historical time periods; grade one - geography (topics that localize a child's place in time and space) and awareness of cultural diversity now and long ago; grade two ∙ people who supply our needs (parents, grandparents, ancestors, and people from many cultures); grade three ∙ topics dealing with continuity and change in local history and the nation's history; grade four ∙ California history; grade five ∙ United States history and geography; grade six ∙ ancient civilizations; grade seven ∙ medieval and the early modern world; grade eight ∙ United States history and geography.
2748 Any humanities course From kindergarten to grade eight, students learn to appreciate great works of art, architecture, literature, and poetry. Students in grades nine through twelve, look at written works, art works, architecture, rituals, social groups, and political institutions as examples of the creative power of the human mind and spirit. Expanded fields of study include linguistics, archaeology, law, history of religions, and the humanistic approach to science technology. Students' writing serves as an expressive response to the works of others, as well as a major way of forming their own ideas.
2760 IB  Economics Offered at two levels, Economics is designed to develop within the student the following skills: disciplined economic reasoning skills; an ability to apply tools of economic analysis to situations and data and to explain the findings clearly; an understanding of how individuals and societies organize themselves in the pursuit of economic objectives; an ability to evaluate economic theories, concepts, situations, and data in a way that is rational and unprejudiced; and international perspectives that feature a tolerance and understanding of the diversity of economic realities in which individual and societies function. The course syllabus has four compulsory parts: resource allocation (i.e., microeconomics); national income analysis (i.e., macroeconomics); international trade; and economic growth and development.
2761 IB  Geography Offered at two levels, Geography is designed to: promote a global perspective and international understanding through geographical education; encourage an appreciation of the role that geography can play in the analysis of contemporary issues; develop an appreciation and concern for the diversity of the natural environment and an understanding of human and physical processes; promote a respect for different cultures through an understanding of their development and their interrelationships; develop an appreciation and understanding of the spatial patterns of physical and human features in the environment; and understand and apply the tools and techniques of geography. The course syllabus includes five central themes: population dynamics; economic growth and development; human responses to natural hazards; agriculture and world food supply; and urban environments.
2762 IB  History Offered at two levels, History is designed to promote the acquisition and understanding of historical knowledge in breadth and in depth and across different cultures; an appreciation and understanding of history as a discipline, including the nature and diversity of its sources, methods, and interpretations; international awareness and understanding by promoting the achievement of empathy with, and understanding of, people living in diverse places and at different times; a better understanding of the present through an understanding of the past; an appreciation of the historical dimension of the human condition; an ability to use and communicate historical knowledge and understanding; and a lasting interest in history. The syllabus requires students to study a selection of six topics in twentieth-century world history: causes, practices, and effects of war; nationalist and independence movements, decolonization and challenges facing new states; the rise and rule of single-party states; the establishment and work of international organizations; the Cold War; and the state and its relationship with religion and with minorities.
2763 IB  Psychology Offered at two levels, Psychology is designed to give students a broad understanding of psychology and of its different theoretical approaches. At both levels, the course guides students through the study of human behavior by examining key topics from four distinct perspectives: behavioral, cognitive, humanistic/phenomenological, and psychodynamic. The course seeks to introduce students to diverse methods of psychological inquiry and promote ethical practices and responsibilities in psychological inquiry. To meet this aim, students at both levels study research design, methods, statistics, and ethical issues in psychological research and application. All students must also undertake one or more research studies.
2764 IB  Philosophy Offered at two levels, Philosophy is designed to enable students to use philosophical language clearly, consistently, and appropriately; identify and formulate problems philosophically; examine concepts and questions philosophically; relate specific texts and authors to the examination of concepts and problems; and construct philosophical arguments. The course is organized around five optional themes and 12 prescribed texts. The texts are divided into two lists: authors up to and including Kant; and post-Kantian philosophy. Students at both levels also undertake individual course work on a philosophical theme, tradition, or text.
2765 IB Social and Cultural Anthropology Offered at two levels, Social and Cultural Anthropology is designed to introduce students to the universal principles of social and cultural life and to characteristics of specific societies and cultures. The course has six required areas of study: ways of understanding society and culture; the nature of ethnography; anthropological models of society; a society's own models and concepts; methodology, methods, and techniques used in field research; and an introduction to developments in anthropological theory. Students at both levels also study a selection of the optional topics in production, distribution, and consumption; authority and the exercise of power; the organization of social relations; power, status, and wealth; gender as an organizing concept; ideologies and cosmologies; the processes of social and cultural transformation; identity and difference; and others.
2766 IB Business and Management Offered at two levels, Business and Management is designed to explore how and why individuals form organizations and the types, problems, and life cycles of organizations; provide a broad knowledge of the variety of organizations that exist, including profit and nonprofit organizations; examine and apply the principles of organization and the techniques widely practiced in the ongoing process of decision making in organizations; develop an understanding of the interdependence of organizations and its effect on problem solving; and examine the role of individuals and groups within organizations. The course is organized around three themes: people, resources, and challenges. Students at both levels explore these themes by relating the effects of decision making, communication, and change to each theme.
2767 IB  History of the Islamic world Offered at two levels, History of the Islamic World is designed to provide students with the means of acquiring openness and a deep understanding of various aspects of the Islamic world and of its contribution to world civilization. Approached from a historical perspective, the course includes political, social, economic, intellectual, and other facets of the Islamic world. Students at both levels study at least three historical topics relating to the origins of Islam and its developments through 1600 AD. History of the Islamic World higher level students undertake a more in-depth study of the prescribed topics by studying a selection of related optional topics: the Fatimids 909-1171 AD; the Ottomans 1400-1566 AD; the Mughals of India; warfare in the medieval Islamic world; Muslim rule in Spain 711-1492 AD; the Islamic city 650-1600 AD; the intellectual legacy of Islam; and Islamic art and architecture.
2768 IB Theory of knowledge Obligatory for all diploma candidates, the Theory of Knowledge (ToK) is unique to the International Baccalaureate. Designed to be taught for a minimum of 100 teaching hours during the two-year program, students follow ToK in addition to their six diploma subjects. The purpose of the course is to stimulate reflection on the knowledge and the experience of students both inside and outside the classroom. Various areas of knowledge (e.g., mathematics, history, and science), truth, logic, value judgments, and the role of language and thought in knowledge are examined at different points in the course. ToK challenges students to question the bases of knowledge, to be aware of subjective and ideological biases, and to develop a personal mode of thought based on analysis of evidence and expressed in rational arguments.
2769 MYP Humanities (history and/or geography) MYP Humanities consists of both geography and history and is intended to be taught throughout the full sequence of the program. The study of geography is intended to lead students from an understanding of the immediate environment to an appreciation of spatial phenomena at regional, national, and global levels. The study of history addresses a variety of cultures and times, and stresses their increasing interaction in our modern world.
2770 AP Macroeconomics This course provides students with a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole, emphasizing the study of national income and price determination. The course develops students' familiarity with economic performance measures, economic growth, and international economics.
2771 AP Microeconomics This course provides students with a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of consumers and producers, emphasizing the nature and functions of product markets while also including a study of factor markets and the role of government in the economy.
2772 AP Comparative govt & politics This course offers students a basic understanding of the world's diverse political structures and practices. Topics include sources of public authority and political power; the relationship between state and society; the relationships between citizens and states; political and institutional frameworks; political change; and the comparative method.
2773 AP U.S. govt & politics This course provides students with an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States, involving both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific case studies. Topics include constitutional underpinnings of U.S. government, political beliefs and behaviors, political parties and interest groups, the institutions and policy process of national government, and civil rights and liberties.
2774 AP European history This course examines European civilization from the High Renaissance period to the recent past and provides a basic exposure to the factual narrative. Students develop an understanding of some of the principal themes in modern European history and an ability to analyze historical evidence and express that understanding and analysis in writing.
2775 AP United States history This course provides students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to understand the course of United States history. Students learn to assess historical materials and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. The course examines time periods from discovery and settlement of the New World through the recent past.
2776 AP Psychology This course introduces students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings, exposes students to each of the major sub fields within psychology, and enables students to examine the methods that psychologists use in their science and practice.
2777 AP Human Geography AP Human Geography introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth's surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice.
2778 AP World History AP World History course is designed for students to develop a greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts, in interaction with different types of human societies. This understanding is advanced through a combination of selective factual knowledge and appropriate analytical skills. The course highlights the nature of changes in international frameworks and their causes and consequences, as well as comparisons among major societies. The course emphasizes relevant factual knowledge deployed in conjunction with leading interpretive issues and types of historical evidence. The course builds on an understanding of cultural, institutional, and technological precedents that, along with geography, set the human stage. Periodization, explicitly discussed, forms an organizing principle for dealing with change and continuity throughout the course. Specific themes provide further organization to the course, along with the consistent attention to contacts among societies that form the core of world history as a field of study.
2779 IB World Religions SL The IB DP world religions course is a systematic, analytical yet empathetic study of the variety of beliefs and practices encountered in nine main religions of the world. The course seeks to promote an awareness of religious issues in the contemporary world by requiring the study of a diverse range of religions. The religions are studied in such a way that students acquire a sense of what it is like to belong to a particular religion and how that influences the way in which the followers of that religion understand the world, act in it, and relate and respond to others.
2780 IB Global Politics The IB DP Global politics course explores fundamental political concepts, such as power, equality, sustainability and peace, in a range of contexts and through a variety of approaches. It allows students to develop an understanding of the local, national, international and global dimensions of political activity, as well as allowing them the opportunity to explore political issues affecting their own lives.
2790 Dual Enrollment College Course - History/Social Science A college history/social science course taken by a student in which the student earns college credit. This course may also count toward the high school graduation requirements (i.e., the student receives both college credit and high school credit).  This is not an Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) course (AP and IB courses have their own Course Group State Codes).
2798 Other social science course This designation is for any social science course not identified in the series of courses outlined  in the CALPADS Course Group State Codes.
2800 Ceramics (Beginning and Advanced) This course develops or extends students' knowledge of ceramic techniques with emphasis on creative design and craftsmanship. Activities include clay modeling, hand building, coil building, and throwing on the potter's wheel. Students develop a working knowledge of kiln firing and glazing techniques. The course provides students with practice in critiquing their own work and the work of others, as well as the study of ceramics throughout the history of art in America and in other countries.
2801 Design This course covers the organization of art elements and principles and provides study of their application in two- and three-dimensional problems. Students analyze and use design principles in works of art from art history and many world cultures. Students learn to critique their work and the work of others and become more aware of design in their environment.
2802 Crafts This course emphasizes original creative design and appropriate use of materials such as paper, fabric, fiber, clay, wood, plastics, plaster, and metal. The course stresses understanding the suitability of design to materials, respect for the integrity of materials, and good craftsmanship. Crafts such as wood carving, fiber arts, and jewelry approached from an artistic intent may be included. Students study the history of crafts in art and their use in specific media.
2803 Art history Art History introduces significant works of art, artists, and artistic movements that have shaped the art world, and have influenced, or reflected periods of history. The course covers the relationship of art to social, political, and historical events in the world/nation or series of artists, women in art, as well as contemporary issues and developments. Included is the analysis of visual images as they have been used and are used to express the needs and ideals of society, as well as those of the individual.
2805 Photography (Beginning or Advanced) This course presents photography as a fine art in which students explore the use of the art elements and principles of design to communicate their ideas, feelings, or values through photographic work. Students learn photographic techniques that may incorporate both traditional and contemporary (digital and multimedia technologies) traditions. They also participate in critiques and study the history of photography as a fine art, as well as the artists who use the medium of photography.
2806 Drawing This course provides a foundation in drawing using a variety of media and techniques in both black and white and color. The course emphasizes observation and interpretation of the visual environment, life drawing, and drawing from the imagination. Included are the application of the elements and principles of design, a study of historical and contemporary art and artists from a worldwide perspective, and instruction and practice in the critique process.
2807 Painting This course provides a foundation in painting in a variety of media and techniques or may concentrate in one media such as watercolor, oil, painting, or acrylics. The course emphasizes observation, interpretation of the visual environment, as well as drawing from the imagination. Included are application of the elements and principles of design, a study of historical and contemporary art and artists from a worldwide perspective, and instruction and practice in the critique process.
2808 Advertising design Creative expression and design principles are related to the field of advertising and commercial art. Students apply the art elements and principles of design to the field of commercial art and advertising design. The course offers practical experiences in generating original ideas, executing layouts, and preparing artwork for reproduction. The course stresses original creative expression. Students study from historical and contemporary views artists who practice the art forms and learn to critique their work and the work of others.
2809 Cinematography/Artistic Videos (Begin or Adv) This course covers the history and development of the cinema, television, artistic videos, claymation, contemporary media and video production, documentaries, and other new media and film aspects. Students learn and practice the various aspects of production by applying the elements of art principles of design for effective visual communication of their ideas, feelings, and values. Students communicate visual ideas using basic production techniques, including camera operation, framing and composition, manipulations of space and time, idea development and communication, the mechanics and psychology of editing, script writing or text creation, light and sound, and impact. Students learn the historical and contemporary foundations of these media and participate in critiques.
2811 Jewelry This course puts into application previous art training in design to create individual pieces of jewelry. The study ranges from the history of jewelry design from a worldwide perspective to contemporary fine art jewelry. Students participate in the critique process. The course encourages students in the exploration of materials, working processes, and the execution of projects in media, such as ceramic, papier-mache, plastic, copper-enameled, brass, and silver jewelry.
2812 Sculpture This course promotes creative expression through three-dimensional form. Students explore sculpture through subtractive (carving), additive (modeling), and assemblage techniques in a variety of media such as wood, clay, plaster, plastics, metal, glass, glass fusion, wire, and found materials. Included is application of the elements and principles of design, a study of historical and contemporary art and artists from a worldwide perspective, and instruction and practice in the critique process.
2813 Fashion design This course introduces drawing of the fashion figure and develops relationships of design to clothing. Included is application of the elements and principles of the visual arts, a study of historical and contemporary visual arts as they relate to fashion design from a worldwide perspective, and instruction in the critique process.
2814 Fibers and textiles This course emphasizes original, creative design using fiber and fiber-related techniques such as weaving, applique, and batik. Students gain an understanding of suitability of design to material and intent from a fine arts point of view. Students apply the art elements and principles of design as they create works of art, study the history of fiber art from a worldwide perspective, and participate in the critique process.
2815 Art appreciation (elementary school standards) This course provides a historical study and basis for appreciation of art from throughout the world and is instructed to the elementary visual arts standards. The course includes the relationship of art to social, political and historical events in the world, museum studies, as well as contemporary issues and developments in history and art. Included is the analysis of visual images as they have been used and are used to express the needs and ideals of society, as well as those of the individual. The course involves students in the creative process through lecture, discussion, observation, audiovisual materials, media arts, and research.
2816 Art appreciation (secondary school standards) This course provides a historical study and basis for appreciation of art from throughout the world and is instructed to the proficient and/or advanced visual arts standards. The course includes the relationship of art to social, political and historical events in the world, museum studies, as well as contemporary issues and developments in history and art. Included is the analysis of visual images as they have been used and are used to express the needs and ideals of society, as well as those of the individual. The course involves students in the creative process through lecture, discussion, observation, audiovisual materials, media arts, and research.
2817 Printmaking This course provides experience with printmaking techniques with an emphasis on creative visual expression of their thoughts, ideas, and values. Elements and principals of design are applied to their work/creation; students study printmaking throughout art history and in many world cultures; learn and practice the critique process, graphic media direct-print processes, relief, intaglio, planographic, digital, and stencil techniques, block printing, serigraphy, monoprints, etching, and lithography.
2818 Multicultural art/folk art This course explores the ways in which objects have provided for the practical, religious, and spiritual needs of cultures with particularly strong craft traditions. These traditions may include African, North and South American Indian, Asian, Islamic, and European cultures and crafts in contemporary America. Instruction is delivered by lecture, discussion, observation, audiovisual materials, research, and experiences that involve the students in the creative process.
2819 Lettering/calligraphy This course teaches various styles of inscribing letters, design developments by means of lettering, the romance of lettering through the ages, and modern use of lettering in advertising and art. The course may focus on calligraphy and stresses original creative expression. Students study from historical and contemporary views and the artists who practice these art forms learn to critique their work and the work of others.
2820 Digital  Art/Computer Art/Artistic Graphics This course helps students develop aesthetic criteria in order to create graphic art imagery using a microcomputer. The course emphasizes the knowledge and application of the art elements and principles of design as used in visual communication. Students use the computer and digital tools to apply or formulate programs to communicate creative visual ideas, including animation, game production, and artistic aspects of Web site design. This course may also include aspects of the Cinematography/Artistic Videos course. Students study artists who practice these art forms and learn and practice critiques of these art forms.
2821 Yearbook This course is designed to provide students with practical experience in planning and producing a book that chronicles the school's events during the year. The course uses an eclectic approach in which students from a variety of disciplines (English, art, photography, graphic arts) cooperate in the production of a yearbook.
2822 Fundamentals of Art (elem school standards) This is a basic course in the fundamentals of art expression taught to the elementary visual arts standards. For grades kindergarten through three, students' experiences may include painting, drawing, lettering, design, and crafts. For grades four through eight, students learn about aesthetic perception, creative expression, art heritage, and aesthetic valuing and their applications with experiences in drawing, painting, design, crafts, ceramics, printmaking, graphics, sculpture, design, and/or lettering.
2823 Fundamentals of Art (secondary school standards) This is a basic course in the fundamentals of art expression taught to the proficient and/or advanced visual arts standards. In grades seven through twelve, the course may include experiences in drawing, painting, two-and three-dimensional design, and sculpture. The course emphasizes observations, interpretation of the visual environment, and imagination and symbolic subjects. Included are application of the elements and principles of design, a study of historical and contemporary art and artists from a worldwide perspective, and instruction and practice in the critique process.
2825 AP Seminar AP Seminar is a foundational course that engages students in cross-curricular conversations that that explore the complexities of academic and real-world topics and issues by analyzing divergent perspectives. Using an inquiry framework, students practice reading and analyzing articles, research studies, and foundational, literary, and philosophical texts; listening to and viewing speeches, broadcasts, and personal accounts; and experiencing artistic works and performances. Students learn to synthesize information from multiple sources, develop their own perspectives in written essays, and design and deliver oral and visual presentation, both individually and as part of a team. Ultimately, the course aims to equip students with the power to analyze and evaluate information with accuracy and precision in order to craft and communicate evidence-based arguments.
2826 AP Research AP Research allows students to deeply explore an academic topic, problem, or issue of individual interest. Through this exploration, students design, plan, and conduct a year-long research based investigation to address a research question.
In the AP Research course, students further their skills acquired in the AP Seminar course by understanding research methodology;
employing ethical research practices; and accessing, analyzing,
and synthesizing information as they address a research question. Students explore their skill development, document their processes, and curate the artifacts of the development of their scholarly work in a portfolio. The course culminates in an academic paper of
approximately 4000–5000 words (accompanied by a performance or exhibition of product where applicable) and a presentation with an oral defense.
2860 IB Visual Arts Offered at two levels, Visual Arts is designed to provide students with the opportunities to develop aesthetic, imaginative and creative facilities; stimulate and train visual awareness, perception, and criticism of the arts of various cultures; enable students to discover, develop, and enjoy various means of creative visual expression; encourage the pursuit of quality through training, individual experiment, and persistence; and encourage a lively, inquiring, and informed attitude toward art and design in all its forms, both in history and today.
2861 MYP Visual Arts MYP Visual Arts brings students into contact with the visual art forms and aesthetic values of other cultures as well as their own, and helps to develop perceptions between ideas and art. Students are encouraged to identify particular creative abilities and to master techniques appropriate to that form of expression. In addition to developing the student's own imagination and skills, the program seeks to acquaint students with the creations of men and women whose works have proven to be of enduring worth.
2870 AP Art History Students critically examine architecture, sculpture, painting, and other art forms within their historical and cultural contexts. In covering the art of several centuries, students learn to identify different styles, techniques, and influences and to formulate and articulate their reactions to various kinds of artwork.
2874 AP Studio Art: Drawing AP Studio Art-Drawing is designed for students who are seriously interested in the practical experience of art. The course is not based on a written examination; instead, students submit portfolios for evaluation at the end of the school year. This course requires the student to show a fundamental competence and range of understanding in visual concerns (and methods). The student is to demonstrate a depth of investigation and process of discovery through the concentration section (12 slides; some may be details). In the breadth section (12 works; one slide of each is submitted), the student is asked to demonstrate a serious grounding in visual principles and material techniques. The quality section (five actual drawings; maximum size is 18 x 24) permits the student to select the works that best exhibit a synthesis of form, technique, and content.
2875 AP Studio Art: Two Dimensional AP Studio Art-Two Dimensional is designed for students who are seriously interested in the practical experience of art. The course is not based on a written examination; instead, students submit portfolios for evaluation at the end of the school year. This course requires the student to show a fundamental competence and range of understanding in visual concerns (and methods). The student is to demonstrate a depth of investigation and process of discovery through the concentration section (12 slides; some may be details). In the breadth section (12 works; one slide of each is submitted), the student is asked to demonstrate a serious grounding in visual principles and material techniques. The quality section (five actual works; maximum size is 18 x 24) permits the student to select the works that best exhibit a synthesis of form, technique, and content.
2876 AP Studio Art: Three Dimensional AP Studio Art-Three Dimensional is designed for students who are seriously interested in the practical experience of art. The course is not based on a written examination; instead, students submit portfolios for evaluation at the end of the school year. The course requires the student to show a fundamental competence and range of understanding in visual concerns (and methods). Each of the portfolios asks the student to demonstrate a depth of investigation and process of discovery through the concentration section (12 slides; some may be second views). In the breadth section (eight works; two slides of each are submitted), the student is asked to demonstrate a serious grounding in visual principles and material techniques. The quality section (five works; two slides of each one are submitted) permits the student to select the works that best exhibit a synthesis of form, technique, and content.
2890 Dual Enrollment College Course - Visual or Performing Arts A college visual or performing arts course taken by a student in which the student earns college credit. This course may also count toward the high school graduation requirements (i.e., the student receives both college credit and high school credit).  This is not an Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) course (AP and IB courses have their own Course Group State Codes).
2898 Other art course This designation for any art course not identified in the series of courses outlined  in the CALPADS Course Group State Codes.
2900 Theatre/play production This course provides a balanced theater arts program that emphasizes dramatic literature and/or musical theater activities that lead to the formal presentation of a scripted play. The class emphasizes awareness and practice in theater production, performance, direction, stage technique, voice, stage design, costuming, properties, and theater history. Students develop language skills and appreciation through reading dramatic literature from a worldwide perspective and writing critiques, character analyses, and play reports.
2901 Theatre/creative dramatics (elem sch standards) Students create plays or scenes and perform them from original scripts or with improvised dialogue and action. Students may take part in pantomime, dialogue, monologue, improvisation, and role-playing. The course includes application of the elements and principles of drama/theater, a study of historical and contemporary theater from a worldwide perspective, and instruction in the critique process.
2904 Advanced Theater This course is designed to enable the student to explore a particular theatrical form in more detail and in depth. The class emphasizes production, performance, stage technique, voice, stage design, costuming, properties, and theater history. The course emphasizes polishing talent, building confidence for professional or apprenticeship auditions, and gaining experience in public performance. Course prerequisites are 2900, 2901, or 2905.
2905 Technical theater/stagecraft In this course, students learn the theory and practice of skills in set production, stage design, lighting and sound, costuming, theater management, and makeup with emphasis on procedures and techniques in all these areas. Students study these elements from a historical and contemporary perspective and learn the critique process. Students act as technical artists involved in staging and presentation of school productions and drama class performances.
2908 Media/film/Video/Television Production This course emphasizes study in the techniques of television, film, and/or video production. Instruction includes history of the media, its technology, and its art. Students write, act, announce, direct, and produce to tell stories or narratives, create movies or videos (documentaries, shorts, or music) in one or various media. Concepts include camera operation, framing and composition, use of time and space, sound and lighting, editing and emotional impact. The course includes application of the elements and principles of the arts, a study of historical and contemporary media arts from a worldwide perspective, and instruction in the critique process. Course may be individual or combined genres.
2910 History/appreciation of theater arts/film This course is for students who desire knowledge in the history of drama, plays, theater, and writers. The course may include the study of outstanding examples in the fields of motion pictures, radio, and television. The course includes instruction in reading, writing, critique processes, and research.
2960 IB Theatre Offered at two levels, Theatre is designed to help students understand the nature of the theatre by making it as well as by studying it and to understand the forms it takes in cultures other than their own. Having completed the course, a student will be expected to demonstrate the following: a knowledge of the major developments and techniques in the theatrical history of more than one culture; an ability to interpret play scripts and other theatrical texts analytically and imaginatively; an understanding of the art of the stage and of the essential nature of criticism in the theatre, particularly self-criticism; an ability to perform before an audience and to demonstrate an understanding of, and some skill in, acting techniques; the acquisition of sufficient technical skill to produce satisfactory work in at least one of the theatrical arts or crafts; and an understanding of the basic processes of theatrical production. Students' ability in and understanding of the theatre arts are assessed in a variety of ways, including research projects and an oral play analysis.
2961 MYP Drama MYP Drama brings students into contact with the performing art forms and aesthetic values of other cultures as well as their own, and helps to develop perceptions between ideas and art. Students are encouraged to identify particular creative abilities and to master techniques appropriate to that form of expression. In addition to developing the student's own imagination and skills, the program seeks to acquaint students with the creations of men and women whose works have proven to be of enduring worth.
2962 IB Film The IB Diploma Programme film course aims to develop students' skills so that they become adept in both interpreting and making film texts.

Through the study and analysis of film texts and exercises in film-making, the course explores film history, theory and socio-economic background. The course develops students' critical abilities, enabling them to appreciate the multiplicity of cultural and historical perspectives in film. To achieve an international understanding within the world of film, students are taught to consider film texts, theories and ideas from the points of view of different individuals, nations and cultures. Students also develop the professional and technical skills (including organizational skills) needed to express themselves creatively in film. The course emphasizes the importance of working individually and as a member of a group. A challenge for students following this course is to become aware of their own perspectives and biases and to learn to respect those of others. This requires willingness to attempt to understand alternative views, to respect and appreciate cultural diversity, and to have an open and critical mind.
2998 Other drama/theater course This designation is for any drama/theater course not identified in the series of courses outlined  in the CALPADS Course Group State Codes.
3020 Consultation/instructional support Teachers in this assignment are not providing the student's primary instruction in a particular content area, but are providing instructional support or consultation to students in either a pull-out or push-in setting.
6001 Skills center/study skills A course that provides academic support and guidance in order to help students achieve success in their academic work. Can include the following content: time management, outlining, note taking, organization, active listening, research methods and test-taking strategies.
6002 Homeroom, study hall A classroom in which all students in a particular grade (or in a division of a grade) meet at certain times under the supervision of a teacher who takes attendance and does other administrative business.
6021 Teacher Preparation/Student Assistant A period where a teacher prepares lesson plans and curricular activities but does not provide instruction to students. Although some teachers may have a student assistant during this class period, the student is not receiving educational content for which they would receive credit towards graduation. In other scenarios, there is no designated teacher and the student is only providing assistance to the school office or other administrative staff.
6022 Free period or No Educational Content A period where a student is not receiving any educational instruction or content and may even be allowed to leave the school campus.
6023 AVID AVID is a college preparatory program for underachieving, educationally disadvantaged secondary students. It was established in 1980 by Mary Catherine Swanson, a high school English teacher in San Diego, California. AVID rejects remediation for disadvantaged students in favor of challenging them to succeed. The AVID model focuses on students who are C students, traditionally unlikely to be eligible for university admission, and offers them access to academic support through specially developed teaching and learning strategies. In exchange for this support, AVID students are expected to commit to taking the most rigorous college preparatory classes offered at their school. Students who join AVID are placed in a daily, single-period AVID class that features a heavy emphasis on writing and inquiry supported by specialized tutoring in core academic subjects. College students provide tutoring.
6024 Exploratory/Wheel/Enrichment/Activity Class (Non-NCLB Core) Classes offered by some middle and elementary schools in which a specific segment of content is taken for less than a semester which allow students to receive an introduction to as subject area they may wish to take at the high school level. The content taught in these classes does not fall in one or more of the NCLB core content areas.
6026 (Teacher Librarian) Information and Digital Literacy and Digital Citizenship Taught by a teacher librarian, this course provides content related to the knowledge of the nature, architecture, and cycle of information. The ability to access, evaluate, use, and integrate information and ideas found in print, media, and digital resources effectively, enabling students to function in a knowledge-based economy and technologically oriented society. Additionally, a lifelong learning process of capacity building for using digital technology, communications tools, and/or networks in creating, accessing, analyzing, managing, integrating, evaluating, and communicating information in order to function in a knowledge-based economy and society. Digital citizenship is an understanding of the ethical, legal and safe use of information and technology. Respect for copyright, intellectual property, and the appropriate documentation of sources including the ability to differentiate between legal and illegal uses of information and sources so that students learn to apply responsible research practices. An awareness of local and global societal issues and responsibilities in an evolving digital culture, digital etiquette, and responsible social interactions related to the use of technology and information. This course can be taught in a departmentalized (with a supplemental authorization) or pull-out setting.
6090 Dual Enrollment College Course - Other A college course in any other content area taken by a student in which the student earns college credit. This course may also count toward the high school graduation requirements (i.e., the student receives both college credit and high school credit).  This is not an Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) course (AP and IB courses have their own Course Group State Codes).
6098 Other instruction-related assignment An instruction-related assignment other than those listed  in the CALPADS Course Group State Codes.
7000 Exploratory Career Technical Education This code is used for courses that explore multiple industry sectors and/or pathways.  This course recruits students into a variety of sectors and/or pathways, allowing them to make a more confident decision about which one to pursue.  It is a pre-introductory class and the class does not contribute to the 300 hours requirement of a pathway.
7001 Exploratory Family and Consumer Sciences (Grades 6-8) This course emphasizes the exploration of the Family and Consumer Sciences content areas, and related career opportunities. Instruction in grades six and seven targets self-development and management, relationships with others, and preparing for family, work, and community living. In grade eight, students study parenting and child development, personal and family relationships, making consumer decisions, personal image and clothing, healthy food choices, designing living environments and development of community, leadership through FCCLA, citizenship, and career roles.
7002 Exploratory Work Experience Education (EWEE) This EWEE course provides career guidance through non-paid observations and experiences at selected worksites. EWEE is an instructional course, where students have the opportunity to observe and sample a variety of conditions of work for ascertaining their interest and suitability for the occupations they are exploring, while including related classroom instruction in WEE. EWEE provides an opportunity for a broad spectrum of students to explore career paths with the goal of clarifying career directions. (10 semester credits allowable for each semester with a maximum of 20 semester credits)
7003 General Work Experience Education (GWEE) This GWEE course enables students to become productive, responsible individuals through supervised, paid employment experiences. GWEE is an instructional course, where students will acquire general and specific occupational and employability skills through a combination of supervised paid employment in any occupational field along with classroom related instruction in WEE. The rationale for having GWEE is the changing nature of work in our society, which requires students to develop appropriate work habits and attitudes that may be transferred to a variety of employment situations. (10 semester credits allowable each semester with a maximum of 40 semester credits)
7004 CTE Work Experience Education (CTWEE) This CTWEE course reinforces and extends vocational learning opportunities for students through a combination of related classroom instruction and supervised paid employment. The CTWEE is to develop and refine occupational competencies necessary to acquire paid employment or paid placements, to adapt to the employment environment, and to advance in an occupation. Students enrolled in CTWEE must have a worksite placement or employment that is related to a previous or concurrently enrolled Career Technical Education course of study. (10 semester credits allowable each semester with a maximum of 40 semester credits)
7100 Introduction to Agriculture and Natural Resources This course typically will include content related to Earth Science in Agriculture or Agriculture Biology. Other Agriscience topics of an introductory nature are also appropriate.
7110 Introduction to Agricultural Business This course is offered to first year agriculture students to provide insight to the different pathways available in agriculture including their application to agriculture business. It has been designed to provide students with a unique perspective of agriculture and its impact on American Society.
7111 Intermediate Agricultural Business (Concentrator) This course will include topics related but not limited to human relationships and effective communication, issue analysis, decision-making and problem-solving, leadership qualities and styles, and ensuring successful completion of group activities. The students then learn and enhance their written and oral communication skills by presenting their views and opinions to the class. Students learn how to arrange and present debates, speeches, and interviews to be effective leaders in today’s society.
7112 Advanced Agricultural Business (Capstone) This course prepares individuals to perform tasks related to agribusiness, marketing, sales, agricultural economics, and management of farm and agriculturally related enterprises. It comprises the study of agribusiness-related careers, farm safety management, responsibilities of management, government organizations and regulations, basic microeconomics and macroeconomics, agricultural credit, record keeping and accounting, cash flow, introduction to taxes, marketing, history and current activities of agricultural cooperatives, purchasing, laws of significance to agriculture, and management decision aids.
7120 Introduction to Agricultural Mechanics This course provides theory and hands-on experiences that provide opportunities for students to develop basic knowledge and skills in agricultural mechanics. Instructional areas include the basic fundamentals of maintaining and repairing small gasoline engines, basic electricity, welding, construction, cold metal work, and operating agricultural equipment safely.
7121 Intermediate Agricultural Mechanics (Concentrator) This course in agriculture mechanics focuses on specialized skill development in welding, fabrication, equipment operation and repair.
7122 Advanced Agricultural Mechanics (Capstone) This course may include advanced skill development in welding, fabrication, equipment operation and repair.
7130 Introduction to Agriscience This course typically will include content related to Earth Science in Agriculture or Agriculture Biology. Other Agriscience topics of an introductory nature are also appropriate.
7131 Intermediate Agriscience (Concentrator) This course will be the second in a sequence and require a prerequisite course. Similar topics as found with introductory courses and would include Agriculture Chemistry.
7132 Advanced Agriscience (Capstone) This course will typically be the third course in a sequence. Courses might focus on Physics applied to agriculture.
7133 Introduction to Sustainable Agriculture This course number is intended for the content of the UCCI adopted course Biology and Sustainable Agriculture. Sustainability is based on a simple principle: Everything that we need for our survival and well-being depends, either directly or indirectly, on our environment. Sustainability creates and maintains the conditions under which humans and the biotic world can exist in productive harmony, that permit fulfilling the social, economic and other requirements of present and future generations.
7134 Intermediate Sustainable Agriculture (Concentrator) This course number is intended for the content of the UCCI adopted course Chemistry and Agriscience. This course explores the physical and chemical nature of soil as well as the relationships between soil, plants, animals and agricultural practices. Students will examine properties of soil and land and their connections to plant and animal production.
7135 Advanced Sustainable Agriculture (Capstone) This course number is intended for the content of the UCCI adopted course Advanced Interdisciplinary Science for Sustainable Agriculture. This integrated class combines an interdisciplinary approach to laboratory science and research with agricultural management principles. Using skills and principles learned in the course, students design systems and experiments to solve agricultural management issues currently facing the industry.
7140 Introduction to Animal Science This course imparts information about the care and management of domestic and farm animals. These courses may cover animal nutrition, health, behavior, selection, reproduction, anatomy and physiology, facilities, product processing, and marketing. Students will be introduced to various species of large and small livestock or they may learn how to care for and maintain livestock as a more inclusive study.
7141 Intermediate Animal Science (Concentrator) This course focuses in a more specific area such as Small Animal Care, Large Animal Care, Aquaculture, Veterinary Science, Animal Anatomy, Animal Nutrition, Animal Reproduction, Dairy Science, Equine Science or other areas of animal agriculture.
7142 Advanced Animal Science (Capstone) This course focuses in a specific area such as Small Animal Care, Large Animal Care, Aquaculture, Veterinary Science, Animal Anatomy, Animal Nutrition, Animal Reproduction, Dairy Science, Equine Science or other areas of animal agriculture. Additionally, capstone courses will address, marketing, sales, agricultural economics, cash flow and management of farms, ranches and animal agriculture related enterprises.
7150 Introduction to Forestry and Natural Resources This course provides insight to the different careers and industry related to Forestry and Natural Resources. Courses will include a focus on the an understanding of the importance of forest ecology, recognizing species of trees and forest plants, tree and plant growth and development, forest and fire management, harvesting, timber stand improvement in both wild land and urban forests.
7151 Intermediate Forestry and Natural Resources (Concentrator) This course provides a more specific area of focus such as wildlife management, resource management, forestry and the development of management plans.
7152 Advanced Forestry and Natural Resources (Capstone) This course provides a more specific area of focus such as wildlife management, resource management, forestry and the development of management plans. This will include marketing, sales, economics, cash flow and management of forest, wildlife and natural resource related enterprises.
7160 Introduction to Ornamental Horticulture This course exposes students to the art and science of growing plants, shrubs, trees, flowers, fruits, and vegetables. They provide information regarding the care and propagation of plants, flowers, trees, and shrubs, but place a special emphasis on those used for decorative and aesthetic purposes. In doing so, they cover a wide variety of topics, including greenhouse and nursery operations, soils and media mixtures, fruit and vegetable production, turf/golf course management, interior and exterior plantscaping, irrigation systems, weed and pest control.
7161 Intermediate Ornamental Horticulture (Concentrator) This course addresses more specific areas of focus to include Landscape Design, Turf Grass propagation, Greenhouse and Nursery production.
7162 Advanced Ornamental Horticulture (Capstone) This course expands on the areas of Landscape Design, Turf Grass propagation, Greenhouse and Nursery production. Additionally, the marketing, sales, economics, cash flow and management of landscape design, greenhouse, nursery and related enterprises.
7163 Introduction to Floral Design This course focuses on the art applied to floral design, care and handling of cut flowers, and the mechanics of floral design.
7164 Intermediate Floral Design (Concentrator) This course builds on the introductory course with increased focus on the art of design, handling of cut flowers and the mechanics of floral design while including the selection of quality flowers and greens, budgeting, retail pricing and presentation.
7165 Advanced Floral Design (Capstone) This course builds on the concentrator course with the addition of marketing, sales, economics, cash flow and management of the retail and wholesale floral business. This will include how to prepare a bid for floral products and services for events.
7170 Introduction to Plant Science This course provides knowledge about the propagation of plants for food and fiber. These courses may cover such topics as plant growth and health, irrigation, pest and weed control, food and fiber processing, and farm operations. They may also cover the knowledge and skills needed to produce all types of crops or may emphasize a particular area of the agricultural industry.
7171 Intermediate Plant Science (Concentrator) This course will focus on more specific areas of plant science such as soil science, viticulture, vegetables, grains, specialty crops. Irrigation and weed and pest control may also be addressed.
7172 Advanced Plant Science (Capstone) This course will continue to focus on more specific areas such as soil science, viticulture, vegetables, grains specialty crops, irrigation, weed and pest control. Additionally, the marketing, sales, economics, cash flow and management of crops and related enterprises will be addressed.
7200 Introduction to Arts, Media, and Entertainment This code is used for AME courses that are introductory to and include content for more than one pathway within the AME sector. This course recruits students into a variety of AME pathways, allowing them to make a more confident decision about which one to pursue.
7211 Intermediate Graphic Design (Concentrator) This course provides students with an in depth experience with digital design tools, processes and systems common to careers in graphic arts and digital production. Career examination and skill building include printing enterprise, art and copy preparation, graphic design, image generation and assembly, production photography, graphic reproduction operations, binding and/or finishing related to digital imaging, printing, and digital production.
7212 Advanced Graphic Design (Capstone) This capstone course provides students with an in depth understanding of digital design tools, processes and systems common to careers in graphic arts and digital production. Close examination of topics include printing enterprise, art and copy preparation, graphic design, image generation and assembly, production photography, graphic reproduction operations, binding and/or finishing related to digital imaging, printing, and digital production. This course serves as the Capstone course to Graphic Design.
7213 Introduction to Animation This course introduces students to the artistic and technological foundations to create animated presentations for industry and entertainment. Students will develop basic drawing and design skills, learn the fundamentals and physics movement, the concept of communication to a given audience, and techniques for self-expression through a variety of animated formats. They will explore the careers and requisite skills required by animators in both entertainment and the business world.
7214 Intermediate Animation (Concentrator) This course will build on foundational artistic and technical animation skills to prepare students for specific career paths in the Animation industry. Students will refine artistic skills and competencies and examine the variety of jobs in creating and producing within the professional animation industry. Students will explore the career options and opportunities in their particular career path.
7215 Advanced Animation (Capstone) This capstone course will provide students with the opportunity to function in a variety of roles within the animation production team. Students will utilize skills acquired in introductory and concentration level animation courses to solve authentic industry problems and to produce a variety of professional quality animation products.
7216 Introduction to Visual / Commercial Art This course provides an introduction to the commercial application of design principles to communicate on a two-dimensional plane. Students will create, manipulate, and analyze artistic elements and media used to express feelings and communicate ideas. Students will study the historical and cultural development of two-dimensional arts and its impact as a communications tool. Students will become familiar with current practices and applications including computer design and career focused traditional arts disciplines.
7217 Intermediate Visual/Commercial Art(Concentrator) This course will emphasize the manipulation of artistic elements, media, and competencies in and beyond the two-dimensional plane. Students will use a variety of media to create industry relevant two and three-dimensional works that are personally and culturally expressive and industry relevant. courses will cover Client relations, the aesthetic and practical applications of design principles in art across disciplines, in architecture, fashion, and other creative industries.
7218 Advanced Visual/Commercial Art (Capstone) This capstone course in the Visual/Commercial Art sequence applies learning from Introductory and Intermediate Visual /Commercial Art in a project based environment. Course work will focus on 2-D and 3-D artistic products and their application to an industry/commercial environment. Skills and knowledge will be demonstrated in both the educational and work based setting. Instruction will focus on applying student knowledge of drawing, painting, graphic design, photo, and 3 –D forms in industry environments. Students will create artistic products that demonstrate entry level workforce skills and comprehensive knowledge of industry practices.
7219 Introduction to Media Arts This course will combine competencies in film, video, computer, and live production, as well as foundational knowledge in design to introduce students to a variety of jobs in the multimedia/communications/game design workforce. Instruction will focus on the interaction between media sources in live, recorded, and web-based productions. Students will develop skills in computer design, film and video production, lighting, sound, and projection design, and print media design. Students will also explore career options within this rapidly expanding industry sector.
7220 Intermediate Media Arts (Concentrator) This course builds on competencies in film, video, computer, and live production design, as well as foundational knowledge in design. Coursework will focus on particular careers in the multimedia/communications /game design workforce. Instruction will focus on the interaction between media sources in live, recorded, and web-based productions. Coursework will deepen specific skills in computer design, film and video production, lighting, sound, and projection design, and print media design in preparation for a content specific Capstone course.
7221 Advanced Media Arts (Capstone) This capstone course in the Media Arts sequence applies learning from Introductory and Intermediate Media Arts in a project based environment. Course work will focus on creative components film, video, computer, and live production application in both the educational and work based setting. Instruction will focus on applying student knowledge of visual art and design in computer and print media, film and video production, digital lighting sound and projection design, in industry environments. Students will create media arts products that demonstrate entry level workforce skills and comprehensive knowledge of industry practices.
7230 Introduction to Dance / Choreography This course explores the variety of career pathways available in dance. It introduces dance technique, choreography, . Students will explore the variety of dance genre (modern, jazz, ballet, tap, and contemporary). Students gain an appreciation of dance as an art form and develop the skills necessary to pursue a variety of careers in dance. The course includes application of the elements and principles of dance, study of historical and contemporary dance, and exploration of the art form from a careers perspective.
7231 Intermediate Dance/Choreography (Concentrator) This course will refine dance and choreographic skills and introduce production elements (i.e., staging, lighting, and sound) and company organization and management in professional dance careers.
7232 Advanced Dance / Choreography (Capstone) This course will apply dance and choreographic skills to create project based performances for live, film and video production. Students will prepare audition or choreographic portfolios, learn business/managerial skills, and develop a professional career plan.
7233 Introduction to Professional Music This course explores the variety of career pathways available in Professional Music. It introduces performance technique, in a variety of musical genre including jazz, classical, modern and pop. Students will explore choral, solo performance, and ensemble music. Students gain an appreciation of music as an art form and develop the skills necessary to pursue a variety of careers in professional music. The course includes music theory and performance as well as the study of historical and contemporary music, with a focus on musical careers.
7234 Intermediate Professional Music (Concentrator) This course will build on foundational music theory and technical knowledge to prepare students for specific career paths in music creation, performance, or production. Students will refine skills and competencies in their particular pathway of the professional music industry. Students will explore the career options and opportunities in their particular career path.
7235 Advanced Professional Music (Capstone) This course will build on music theory and technical knowledge to prepare students for specific career paths in music creation, arrangement, and production. Students will explore music as an interpretive form of artistic expression and as a practical communications tool. Students will be trained to compose and appreciate music in a variety of genre. The historical and cultural context of composition will also be examined. The psychological impact on audience and market will be evaluated to maximize the effectiveness of a composition or arrangement. Students will explore the spectrum of career options ranging from artistic communication to entertainment to marketing and identify the effective use of musical composition in each pathway.
7236 Introduction to Professional Theatre This course introduces the variety of careers in professional theater. Students will study a range of professional models from Broadway to regional to community theatre to identify established practices and basic competencies required to create professional theatre.
7237 Intermediate Professional Theatre (Concentrator) This course will build on the foundational skills in a variety of technical and performance disciplines to create project-based live performances in theatre and musical theatre. Students will explore portfolio preparation for live and film/video performance. Students will also be introduced to the business/managerial careers associated with live theatrical performance.
7238 Advanced Professional Theatre (Capstone) This course will apply skills theatrical performance to create project based performances in theatre, musical theatre, film and video production. Students will prepare audition or direction portfolios, learn business/managerial skills, and develop a professional career plan.
7240 Introduction to Stage Technology This course introduces the techniques and processes involved in stage management, prop construction, lighting, the setup and operation of sound systems, and the operation of projection equipment. The program develops basic construction techniques for stage property and scenery; affords practice in stage crew work, which includes the erection and striking of scenery; and provides an overview of related occupations in radio and television.
7241 Intermediate Stage Technology (Concentrator) This course will train students in the use and management of the various elements of technical production during a dance, music, or theatrical performance. These elements include the rigging and movement of sets, scenery, and lighting equipment, the use of computerized switching systems for lighting and sound, the management and distribution of stage properties, etc. Students will also be taught to manage the complex support tasks that are involved in a performance. They will explore apprenticeship, higher education options career training, and professional placement.
7242 Advanced Stage Technology (Capstone) This course will build on foundation skills in Stage Technology and Production to include design in variety of theatrical productions. Students will use analytical skills to interpret literary material to create a design concept. Students will be familiar with design elements, drafting techniques, computer software, and modeling skills necessary to prepare designs and models of theatrical sets. They will be trained to interpret mechanical drawings to safely use appropriate power equipment to construct sets based on artist’s designs. They will also become familiar with the diverse array of production materials and techniques used to augment live theatrical productions.
7243 Introduction to Film/Video Production This course trains students to use film as a tool for communication and self-expression in entertainment and industry. Students will study the history and aesthetics of film as a complex, collaborative art form. They will explore the foundational elements of writing, photography, visual perception, and elements of design as they apply to cinematic expression. Students will analyze the use of film and video to share ideas and influence culture. They will also be trained in the multiple technical competencies required to communicate through film and the rich variety of employment opportunities available in the field.
7244 Intermediate Film/Video Production (Concentrator) This course covers the history and development of the cinema, documentaries, and other new media and film technologies. Students learn skills and practices in various aspects of cinema and video production by applying the elements of art, principles of design, integration of technology for the effective visual communication of their ideas, feelings, and values. Students develop skills, including camera/recording operation, framing and composition, manipulations of space and time, idea development and communication, the mechanics and psychology of editing, script writing or text creation, light and sound, and impact.
7245 Advanced Film/Video Production (Capstone) This course will examine specific uses of film and video technology in various entertainment and industry sectors. Students receive advanced training in pre and post production jobs and competencies, current and emerging technologies, and the collaborative nature of the creative process involved in video production. (Capstone)
7246 Introduction to Multimedia Production This course will provide foundational competencies in film, video, computer, and live production, as well as foundational knowledge in design to prepare students for employment in a variety of jobs in the multimedia/communications workforce. Instruction will focus on the interaction between media sources in live, recorded, and web-based productions. Students will develop skills in computer design, film and video production, lighting, sound, and projection design, and print media design.
7247 Intermediate Multimedia Production (Concentrator) This course provides students skills and competencies in broadcast media including television, radio, web/pod casting, and emerging broadcasting technologies. Students will become familiar with current and emerging technology and practices and the variety of career opportunities that present themselves in the live broadcasting pathways (see Television Production and Radio Presentation for further information).
7248 Advanced Multimedia Sound Production (Capstone) This course will allow students to examine the multiple uses of radio as a broadcast medium in various entertainment and industry sectors. They will receive task oriented training in pre, post, and “on air” production jobs and competencies, current and emerging technologies, and the collaborative nature of the creative process involved in radio production. In addition to “on air” performance techniques, students will examine the technological interface of sound, recording, audio switching, and computer modification involved in radio broadcast production.
7249 Advanced Multimedia Film/Video Production (Capstone) This Capstone course for the Multi-Media Production pathway examines the specific uses of film and video technology in various creative industry applications. Students will demonstrate advanced knowledge and skills in pre-production, production, and post-production practices in an educational and work based environment. Students will create film, video and sound projects that demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of professional film, video and sound production.
7260 Introduction to Game Design This course introduces students to the rapidly developing field game design and production. They will explore current technologies, media and art applications, and emerging technological advances that impact this ever expanding field. They will combine foundations in design, animation, graphic imaging, and multimedia production to prepare for employment, advanced training, or higher education in project or software design.
7261 Intermediate Game Design (Concentrator) This course refines student skills and expands student knowledge in current technologies, media and art applications, and emerging technological advances that impact the game design field. Students will refine skills in design, animation, graphic imaging, coding and multimedia production to prepare for employment, advanced training, or higher education in project or software design. Students will explore other industry application including a mobile application design and technology.
7262 Advanced Game Design (Capstone) This course will prepare students for entry level careers or continuing education in a particular area of game design. Students will use advanced skills to create collaborative projects, evaluate peer designs, and create a design portfolio and career plan.
7300 Introduction to Building and Construction Trades This course provides students with an overview of the building and construction trades sector, which emphasizes processes, systems, and the way in which structures are built. It also provides students with insight into the different pathways available within the sector and the different career opportunities associated with each pathway.
7310 Introduction to Cabinetry, Millwork, and Woodworking This course introduces students to career opportunities within the sector and provides an overview of the planning, design, layout, and technical drawing interpretation for practical use in woodworking, cabinetmaking, and millworking. It may also cover different cabinet and furniture styles used, various wood products and materials, and proper tool selection. Students will be introduced to the different construction processes in the cabinetmaking, furniture making, and millworking industries.
7311 Intermediate Cabinetry, Millwork, and Woodworking (Concentrator) This course will build on foundational skills attained in the introductory course(s). Students will gain competence in the planning, design, layout, and technical drawing interpretation for practical use in woodworking, cabinetmaking, and millworking. They may learn about: furniture and cabinet styles, wood products and materials, finishes, countertops, and the use of laminates and veneers. They will gain competence in various construction processes in the cabinetmaking, furniture making, and millworking industries. They will demonstrate proper techniques for furniture building as well as cabinet and countertop construction and installation.
7312 Advanced Cabinetry, Millwork, and Woodworking (Capstone) This course allows students to demonstrate mastery in skills attained in concentrator courses. This may include demonstrating competency in the planning, construction, and installation of furniture, cabinets, countertops, and/or other millwork products. Students will demonstrate competence in the design, layout, and technical drawing interpretation for practical use in woodworking, cabinetmaking, and millworking. They will demonstrate mastery of various construction processes by building and/or installing furniture, cabinets, countertops, or any number of millwork products.
7320 Introduction to Engineering and Heavy Construction This course will introduce students to career opportunities within the sector and provide an overview of heavy industrial construction and the way in which roads, highways and subdivisions are built. Students will learn the basics of construction equipment, operation, and safety. They may also be introduced to soil properties, surveying and mapping, grading and drainage, water and wastewater systems, and masonry.
7321 Intermediate Engineering and Heavy Construction (Concentrator) This course will build on foundational skills attained in the introductory course(s). Students will learn about soil properties, survey and mapping, grading and drainage, and water and wastewater systems. They will also learn about basic concrete maintenance and repair, and heavy equipment use, operation, and safety standards. Students may also learn about project management for heavy construction projects, internal and external impacts on the construction industry, and how to recognize building phases, systems, and techniques.
7322 Advanced Engineering and Heavy Construction (Capstone) This capstone course allows students to demonstrate mastery in skills attained in concentrator courses. Student may demonstrate mastery by: interpreting soil reports, performing a survey or mapping, operating various heavy equipment in a safe manner, and/or mixing, pouring and finishing concrete. Students will demonstrate understanding of water and wastewater systems, the importance of safety rules and regulations, and knowledge of building codes and other applicable environmental laws and regulations as they relate to heavy construction projects. Students may also demonstrate understanding of project management procedures and processes as they relate to heavy construction projects.
7330 Introduction to Mechanical Systems Installation and Repair This course will introduce students to career opportunities within the sector and provide an overview of the theories and concepts of heating, ventilation, air-conditioning (HVAC), refrigeration, and appliance installation, maintenance, and repair. Students will be introduced to basic electricity and electrical control systems. The pathway includes preparation for a Class C California License and EPA certification.
7331 Intermediate Mechanical Systems Installation and Repair (Concentrator) This course will build on foundational skills attained in the introductory course(s). Students will learn to install, operate, test, repair, and maintain commercial and domestic heating and air-conditioning systems. Students may also learn how to operate, maintain, and repair such building systems as plumbing, electrical, and other mechanical systems. Students will learn to fabricate tubing, piping, and fittings to industry standards, and troubleshoot electrical control systems, motors, and their components. Students will develop skills that prepare them for a Class C California License and EPA certification.
7332 Advanced Mechanical Systems Installation and Repair (Capstone) This course allows students to demonstrate mastery in skills attained in concentrator courses. Students will: fabricate tubing, piping, and fittings to industry standards; service or repair heating and/or air-conditioning systems; and troubleshoot electrical control systems, motors, and their components. Students will demonstrate understanding of: basic electricity; the basic components and concepts of heating, air-conditioning, and refrigeration; methods and devices used to improve air quality, and scientific theories and properties of heat and matter. They may also demonstrate practical knowledge of combustion heating systems. Students may be prepared for a Class C California License and EPA certification.
7340 Introduction to Residential and Commercial Construction This course will introduce students to career opportunities within the sector and focuses on the manner in which residential and commercial structures are designed and built. The course covers construction and building design, performance, and sustainability, the study of safety, hand and power tools, planning and design, applicable mathematics, blueprint reading, trade nomenclature, residential and commercial construction standards, construction manufacturing standards, and other specialized skills. The pathway includes preparation for a Class B California License.
7341 Intermediate Residential and Commercial Construction (Concentrator) This course will build on foundational skills attained in the introductory course(s). Students will learn the impact of financial, technical, environmental, and labor trends on the construction industry. They will gain competence in mathematical calculations that are used in the trades, and interpret technical drawings and schedules. The course will cover techniques for proper site preparation and foundation layout. Students will gain competence in carpentry skills that prepare them to lay out, fabricate, erect, install and repair wooden structures and fixtures. Topics covered may also be: framing, installing drywall and interior/exterior finishes, building walls and partitions, and installing roof systems, floors and floor coverings, and electrical wiring. Students will learn to integrate and employ sustainable construction practices, and may develop skills that prepare them for a Class B California License.
7342 Advanced Residential and Commercial Construction (Capstone) This course allows students to demonstrate mastery in skills attained in concentrator courses. Students will apply appropriate mathematical calculations, interpret technical drawings, and demonstrate techniques for proper site preparation and foundation layout. They will demonstrate carpentry techniques for the construction of a single-family residence, proper installation techniques of internal and external materials and finishes, employ sustainable construction practices, and install plumbing and electrical systems that adhere to industry standards. Students may be prepared for a Class B California License.
7400 Introduction to Business and Finance This course introduces students to key business concepts found in the Business Management, Financial Services, and International Business pathways. Students are introduced to the financial world and develop financial literacy through the study of income and wealth; financial institutions; how businesses raise capital; and study key investment-related terms and concepts. Students learn key concepts for managerial accounting, including manufacturing and cost accounting and budgeting. Students develop an understanding of how and why businesses choose to expand operations into other countries. Students examine careers in business, both as employees and as business owners.
7410 Intermediate Business Management Communication Technologies (Concentrator) This course provides an in-depth, hands-on introduction to business technologies used for business communication. Topics include communication through digital documents, presentations, data computation and presentation, as well as how to represent themselves through digital media to society. This course applies the principles of ethical and effective communication in the creation of business letters, memos, emails, as well as written and oral reports for a variety of business situations. Concepts taught in this course will satisfy local computer literacy requirements and prepares individuals to create business correspondence, reports, publications, and forms by using computer operating systems; word processing; database, spreadsheet, and desktop publishing software; hardware and peripherals. Related topics in this course include human relationships and effective communication, issue analysis, decision-making and problem-solving, leadership qualities and styles, and ensuring successful teamwork.
7411 Intermediate Business Management Technologies (Concentrator) This course provides a comprehensive overview of the technologies present in today’s business environment. Students are exposed to business practices that streamlines and promotes more effective operations. Students will understand how computer hardware and software are used to solve business problems and create business opportunities using entrepreneurship skills. Students will learn how the Internet was developed and how it is used today gaining an understanding of basic information technology protocols and the basics of connectivity in a global environment. Students will learn how to install and use common Web browsers and how to configure common browser preferences, including fonts, home pages, history, browser cache, image loading, bookmarks/favorites and security settings. Students will learn about Multimedia on the Web and how to install and upgrade common plug-ins, add-ons and applications. Students will understand the importance of computer security and understand how Virus, Worms, Trojans, Spyware, and illicit servers can affect computers and business networks.
7412 Advanced Business Management Enterprise and Project Management (Capstone) This course prepares students to perform marketing and management functions and tasks associated with starting, owning, and operating a business. Students learn the principles and methods of organizing a business firm and for combining resources to produce goods and services, taking account of costs, profits, and the nature and extent of competition in markets. This course describes management functions and project management skills, project life cycle and project triangle as they are used to accomplish organizational goals. Program content addresses organizational theory; human resource development; management principles and styles; policy and strategy formation; production and operations management, planning and development; and economic theory and practice. Students are provided work-based learning opportunities and opportunities to obtain industry certification to demonstrate their mastery of career-ready skills.
7420 Intermediate Financial Services and Banking (Concentrator) This course introduces students to the financial world through the study of income and wealth; financial institutions; how businesses raise capital; and study key investment-related terms and concepts. Students learn the history of how banking practices evolved and how businesses operate, grow, and thrive in our ever-changing world. This course includes principles on how to make good personal financial decisions and will cover major functions of financial institutions. Related topics in this course include modern trends in the finance industry, credit functions, loan creation, debt collection, and stocks and bonds. Students will learn the importance of integrity and professional ethics in business relationships; and the tools effective leaders use to instill an ethical workplace culture.
7421 Intermediate Financial Services Management and Business Economics (Concentrator) This course discusses the economy and the factors that influence the success of businesses and products. Students will understand the roles of citizens, workers and consumers and the importance of planning, organizing, and controlling the monetary resources of a business. This course describes forms of business ownership, discusses the relationship of labor and business, and applies techniques for managing human resources to maximize operational efficiencies and effectiveness. Students will demonstrate characteristics of professionalism in working relationships with customers and employees. This Course integrates economic principals with entrepreneurship/business concepts.
7422 Advanced Financial Services Business Accounting (Capstone) This course provides students with an understanding of how accounting processes are used to provide important financial information to internal and external stakeholders. Student apply the accounting cycle for both a service and merchandising business through closing the books for a sole proprietorship, partnership, and corporation; select and use appropriate computer hardware and software to develop, process, and maintain accounting records and create reports. Students complete accounting simulations and business case studies and analyze revenue streams and revenue forecasting. Related topics include: subsidiary ledgers, financial statements, asset acquisition and disposition, depreciation methods, flexible budgets, and capital budgeting decisions. Students are provided work-based learning through professional organizations like the American Institute of CPAs (certified public accountants) and earn industry certifications to demonstrate their mastery of career-ready skills.
7430 Intermediate International Business (Concentrator) This course allows students to develop an understanding of how and why businesses choose to expand operations into other countries and develop the capacity and disposition to understand and act on business opportunities at the global level. This course will provide students with experiences to investigate the world and how it works, recognize that they have perspectives that others may or may not share. Students will develop the skill to compare and contrast perspectives and to integrate various viewpoints to construct a new one. Students will learn to effectively communicate, verbally and nonverbally, with wide-ranging audiences and collaborate on diverse international teams. Students will understand the fundamental concepts of international business and how to deploy modern technologies to conduct a business globally as an entrepreneur. Related topics in this course include the logistics of importing and exporting products and services, direct and indirect distribution channels, forms of international operations, and the role of information and communication technologies in modern global trade.
7431 Intermediate International Business Communications (Concentrator) This course provides an in-depth, hands-on introduction to business technologies used for business communication. Topics include communication through digital documents, presentations, data computation and presentation, as well as how to represent themselves through digital media to society. This course applies the principles of ethical and effective communication in the creation of business letters, memos, emails, as well as written and oral reports for a variety of business situations. Concepts taught in this course will satisfy local computer literacy requirements and prepares individuals to create business correspondence, reports, publications, and forms by using computer operating systems; word processing; database, spreadsheet, and desktop publishing software; hardware and peripherals. Related topics in this course include human relationships and effective communication across cultures, issue analysis, decision-making and problem-solving, leadership qualities and styles, and ensuring successful teamwork.
7432 Advanced International Business Enterprise (Capstone) This course prepares students to perform marketing and management functions and tasks associated with starting, owning, and operating an international business. Students learn the principles and methods of organizing a business firm and for combining resources to produce and import and export goods and services, taking account of costs, profits, and the nature and extent of competition in markets. This course describes management functions and project management skills, project life cycle and project triangle as they are used to accomplish organizational goals. Program content addresses organizational theory; human resource development; management principles and styles; policy and strategy formation; production and operations management, planning and development; and economic theory and practice. Students are provided work-based learning opportunities to work with international organizations and opportunities to obtain industry certification to demonstrate their mastery of career-ready skills.
7500 Introduction to Education, Child Development, and Family Services This introductory course for the Education, Child Development, and Family Services sector is the first in a sequence of courses that provides instruction in the eight content areas of Family and Consumer Sciences. The focus is on preparing students for personal and life management, and providing a strong foundation for Family and Consumer Sciences education related career paths. Instruction in the content areas of child development and guidance; consumer education; family and human development; education; fashion, textiles, and apparel; food and nutrition; housing and furnishings; individual and family health; and leadership is designed to prepare students with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to function effectively as family members, leaders, workers, and citizens.
7510 Intermediate Child Development (Concentrator) This concentration course prepares students to understand children's physical, mental, emotional, and social growth and development, as well as provide for their care and guidance. Instruction includes prenatal developments; research theories in human growth and development from prenatal stages of development to puberty and beyond; inherited characteristics; health and safety; guidance and discipline; cultural diversity; child abuse and neglect; and children with special needs. This course provides a solid foundation for any career that involves working with children, including child care and education.
7511 Advanced Child Development (Capstone) This capstone course prepares students for employment in the care and guidance of young children under the supervision of professional personnel. Instruction includes child and growth and development; nutrition; program planning and management; health and safety; guidance; recreational and play activities; child abuse and neglect; developmentally appropriate practices; interpersonal relationships; regulations; operational procedures; emergency and disaster procedures; policies, standards, and licensing; supervision and maintenance of children's environments; professionalism; and classroom management.
7520 Intermediate Consumer Services (Concentrator) This concentration course prepares students to understand, analyze, manage, and maintain values, needs, wants, goals and resources, in order to make decisions that contribute to personal, family, and work life. Instruction includes decision making; earning an income, taxes, money management, financial planning, family economics, understanding the marketplace, selling methods, retail information; consumer rights and responsibilities, managing credit; housing decisions, equipment selection, energy saving techniques; the consumer as part of the national and global economy; and the organization of activities in the home as a means of successfully combining work and family roles. This course provides the background needed in a variety of careers that involve consumer information and purchasing, financial literacy, as well as financial planning.
7521 Advanced Consumer Services (Capstone) This capstone course prepares students for employment in occupations in personal and financial services; product development, test and demonstration; energy; environment; and consumer communications. Instruction includes comparison shopping; consumer laws and regulations; selection and use of products and equipment; demonstration of new products; energy conservation methods; preparation of materials for publication, broadcast or telecast; interpretation of consumer needs to manufacturers, and methods of responding to customer inquiries. Students develop skills to process mail and phone orders; prepare reports; use industry technology; set up and arrange displays; determine customer needs and wants; select merchandise and products; and assist clients in the selection of services.
7530 Intermediate Education (Concentrator) This concentration course prepares students for professional or learning support positions in education, prekindergarten through grade twelve. Students study human development; standards, regulations, and codes; positive guidance and counseling techniques; age-appropriate and grade-appropriate learning strategies; learning theories; and standards-based curriculum and instructional design.
7531 Advanced Education (Capstone) This capstone course builds on concentration course content and is the final course taken in the Education pathway sequence. Students are prepared for a career or further postsecondary training. Students can apply and practice their knowledge and skills at a variety of elementary and secondary education sites.
7540 Intermediate Family and Human Services (Concentrator) This concentration course prepares students to understand the basis, function, and significance of the interpersonal and family relations, human development, and individual needs throughout the life cycle. Instruction includes the meaning of family; quality relationships; love and commitment; marriage; major life adjustments; and parenting. Other topics of instruction can be good health habits; positive mental attitudes; management of stress; good nutrition; body systems; substance use and abuse; managing manipulation; relationships; pregnancy; diseases and infections; safety and emergency care; maintaining a healthy environment; values; goals; decision-making; interpersonal relationships and communication skills; and managing personal and family crisis. This course provides the needed background for a variety of careers involved with assisting in the care of children and family, family and human services, as well as the elderly.
7541 Advanced Family and Human Services (Capstone) This capstone course prepares students for employment in occupations in family and social services. Instruction includes locating and accessing community resources and housing appropriate for low-income and other clients, and assisting professional staff with interviewing and compiling information. Instruction may include, but not be limited to, organizing and facilitating groups; scheduling activities that meet the needs and interests of individual members; attitudes and knowledge needed for employment in elder care and intergenerational services occupations, personal health habits and nutrition; the importance of social involvement and sensitivity to common problems experienced by individuals and families with special needs; supervision and safety of clients; common problems of families; professional standards, laws and regulations; and compiling information on social, educational or institutional history.
7600 Introduction to Energy, Environment, and Utilities This course provides students with an overview of the energy, environment and utilities sector, focuses on the principles of power and energy, and emphasizes sustainability practices and processes. It provides students with insight into the different pathways available within the sector and the different career opportunities associated with each pathway.
7610 Introduction to Environmental Resources This course will introduce students to career opportunities within the sector and provides an overview of the principles of power and energy, alternative/green/sustainable technologies, and the fundamentals of electrical power systems. It may also introduce students to the principles, concepts, and operations of residential and commercial energy and utilities industries.
7611 Intermediate Environmental Resources (Concentrator) This course will build on foundational skills attained in the introductory course(s). Students will explore basic conventional and emerging principles and concepts of the energy industry, including energy production, energy transmission, and alternative energy technologies. The course may also cover nuclear and non-nuclear power generation technologies, their fuel sources, and plant operations (including: coal, oil, natural gas, solar, wind, geothermal power, hydroelectric, or biofuel). Students may learn research methods of energy procurement, transmission, distribution, and storage, and gain an understanding of interrelationships among components of electrical systems.
7612 Advanced Environmental Resources (Capstone) This capstone course allows students to demonstrate mastery in skills attained in concentrator courses. Students will demonstrate understanding of the conventional and emerging principles and concepts of the energy industry, including energy production, energy transmission, and alternative/green/sustainable/renewable energy technologies. They will demonstrate understanding of the different types of electric power generation technologies and their fuel sources, the advantages and disadvantages of each, and their effect on the environment. Student may demonstrate mastery by explaining the components of electrical systems, the fission process, principles of biomass conversion, nuclear power generation; summarizing the basic operating principles of fossil, hydroelectric, and internal combustion systems; or being able to explain and apply Ohm’s Law.
7620 Introduction to Energy and Power Technology This course will introduce students to career opportunities within the sector and provides an overview of emerging energy and environmental technologies, such as include solar, wind, nuclear, renewable and non-renewable energy sources, and the associated environmental issues and societal response.
7621 Intermediate Energy and Power Technology (Concentrator) This course will build on foundational skills attained in the introductory course(s). Students gain a deeper understanding of the science and technology of current and future energy sources along with the associated environmental problems and societal response. The course may cover concepts and principles of environmental resources, the role of law and policy in regulation and management of natural resources and the environment, and water and land use, including efficiency, quality, scarcity, and waste management.
7622 Advanced Energy and Power Technology (Capstone) This capstone course allows students to demonstrate mastery in skills attained in concentrator courses. Students will demonstrate understanding of: energy resources and their effects on the environment; global interactive systems and elements that create and sustain climate; land use, air quality, and drinking water management systems, and their potential for environmental impact; storm water, rivers, and groundwater systems, and environmental legislation and regulations. Student may demonstrate mastery by evaluating regional interactive systems and elements that create harmful environmental effects, identifying the role and impact of waste management systems, implementing processes to support energy efficiency, and/or preparing an efficient solar heated water design and installation plan.
7630 Introduction to Telecommunications This course will introduce students to career opportunities and provide an overview of basic telecommunications principles and concepts. It may also examine the role and function of satellites, explore privacy and security issues, and examine the differences between fixed-wire and wireless telecommunications systems.
7631 Intermediate Telecommunications (Concentrator) This course will build on foundational skills attained in the introductory course(s). Students will learn the basic and emerging technologies in the telecommunications industry and further examine the role and functions of satellites in telecommunications. Topics covered may also include: researching the components, interaction, and operations of fixed-wire and wireless telecommunications systems, and privacy and security issues related to telecommunications systems.
7632 Advanced Telecommunications (Capstone) This capstone course allows students to demonstrate mastery in skills attained in concentrator courses. Students will demonstrate understanding of the basic and emerging technologies in the telecommunications industry and the role and functions of satellites in telecommunications. They may also demonstrate understanding of the components, interaction, and operations of fixed-wire and wireless telecommunications systems, privacy and security issues, and proficiency in customer relations within the telecommunications industry.
7700 Introduction to Engineering and Architecture This introduction course provides students with the foundational concepts required for pursuing career pathways within this industry sector. The skills and content knowledge helps prepare students to continue their education in multiple pathway concentrator courses within this industry sector.
7710 Intermediate Architectural Design (Concentrator) This concentrator course builds upon the Engineering and Architecture introduction course and provides students with additional concepts and experiences required for career readiness and pursuing further education in Architectural Design career pathway, which precedes this pathway's capstone course. This concentrator course leads to the capstone course in the Architectural Design pathway's sequence of courses.
7711 Advanced Architectural Design (Capstone) This capstone course further builds upon the Engineering and Architecture introduction course, and is the final course taken. This career technical education capstone course provides content, skill development and leadership training which prepare students for the world of work and to pursue further education such as industry certifications and a postsecondary degree.
7720 Intermediate Engineering Technology (Concentrator) This concentrator course builds upon the Engineering and Architecture introduction course and provides students with additional concepts and experiences required for career readiness and pursuing further education in Engineering Technology career pathway, which precedes this pathway's capstone course. This concentrator course leads to the capstone course in the Engineering Technology pathway's sequence of courses.
7721 Advanced Engineering Technology (Capstone) This capstone course further builds upon the Engineering and Architecture introduction course, multiple pathway concentrator courses, and is the final course taken which prepares students to work and pursue further education in multiple career pathways. This career technical education capstone course provides content, skill development and leadership training which prepare students for the world of work and to pursue further education such as industry certifications and a postsecondary degree.
7730 Intermediate Engineering Design (Concentrator) This concentrator course builds upon the Engineering and Architecture introduction course and provides students with additional concepts and experiences required for career readiness and to pursue further education in the Engineering Design career pathway. This concentrator course leads to the capstone course in the Engineering Design pathway's sequence of courses.
7731 Advanced Engineering Design (Capstone) This capstone course further builds upon the Engineering and Architecture introduction course, and Engineering Design pathway concentrator course/s, in this sector. The capstone is the final course taken in the complete sequence of courses. This career technical education capstone course provides content, skill development and leadership training which prepare students for the world of work and to pursue further education such as industry certifications and a postsecondary degree.
7740 Intermediate Environmental Engineering (Concentrator) This concentrator course builds upon the Engineering and Architecture introduction course and provides students with additional concepts and experiences required for career readiness and pursuing further education in Environmental Engineering career pathway, which precedes this pathway's capstone course. This concentrator course leads to the capstone course in the Environmental Engineering pathway's sequence of courses.
7741 Advanced Environmental Engineering (Capstone) This capstone course further builds upon the Engineering and Architecture introduction course and concentrator course/s, in this sector. The capstone is the final course taken in the complete sequence of courses. This career technical education capstone course provides content, skill development and leadership training which prepare students for the world of work and to pursue further education such as industry certifications and a postsecondary degree.
7800 Introduction to Fashion and Interior Design This introductory course for the Fashion and Interior Design sector is the first in a sequence of courses that provides instruction in the eight content areas of Family and Consumer Sciences. The focus is on preparing students for personal and life management, and providing a strong foundation for Family and Consumer Sciences education related career paths. Instruction in the content areas of child development and guidance; consumer education; family and human development; education; fashion, textiles, and apparel; food and nutrition; housing and furnishings; individual and family health; and leadership is designed to prepare students with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to function effectively as family members, leaders, workers, and citizens.
7810 Intermediate Fashion Design and Merchandising (Concentrator) This concentration course expands on the comprehensive core and prepares students to understand the social, psychological, physiological and design aspects of fashion, textiles, and apparel. Instruction includes apparel and behavior; elements and principles of design; color theory, wardrobe planning, history of apparel, specialized clothing, wardrobe budgets, retail options, textiles, garment care, alterations, personal and family clothing selection and purchase; design and construction of clothing, utilizing of advanced construction techniques; couture design elements; and modification of clothing to meet the special needs of individuals. This course is highly recommended for students interested in pursuing a career in the fashion industry.
7811 Advanced Fashion Design and Merchandising (Capstone) This capstone course prepares students with the skills, attitudes, and knowledge needed for employment in the fashion design, manufacturing, maintenance, and merchandising of apparel and accessories, as well as industry certification. Instruction includes operational procedures; textiles identification and analysis; industry regulation, fabric selection, care and repair; the elements and principles of design; design apparel construction (including draping, pattern making, and grading); fitting and alteration. Instruction can also include merchandising and fashion forecasting, developing and merchandizing of a line, and using technology that is used in the industry. Students develop skills to select fabric, design and construction of apparel, fit and alter garments, product knowledge, illustrate designs, and merchandising techniques; sales and service; fashion forecasting; visual merchandising; operational procedure, inventory control, and loss prevention; cash and credit transactions; and technology used in the industry.
7820 Intermediate Interior Design (Concentrator) This concentration course expands on the comprehensive core and prepares students to understand the physical, psychological, and social influences on complex housing decisions. The course includes the study of environmental concerns that impact housing, such as conservation of resources, materials, and construction technology, as well as the analysis of cultural, psychological, functional and aesthetic design concepts. Topics include design principles and elements; housing decisions; materials, furnishings, accessories, and equipment; color theory; space planning; textiles and finishes; landscaping; historical periods of architecture and furniture styles and the conditions that influenced them, and population trends. This course provides a background for a variety of careers in residential and commercial furnishings, interior design, and interior maintenance.
7821 Advanced Interior Design (Capstone) This capstone course prepares students for employment in occupations concerned with furnishing and decorating residential and commercial properties. Instruction includes assisting purchasers in selecting and maintaining suitable furnishings and/or equipment; assisting interior designers, decorators or professional home service directors; selection of slipcovers, draperies, curtain and window treatments; upholstery; designing accessories as floral arrangements or decorations; designing space to address needs; the care and maintenance of residential and commercial floor surfaces, wall coverings, furnishings and equipment; and personal management.
7830 Intermediate Makeup Artistry (Level 1) (Concentrator) This is the introductory/intermediate level course of a multi-level hour program (300 of 600 clock hours). The introductory course gives the students a comprehensive career opportunities and introductory skills in makeup artistry. Services in this level cover basic makeup applications, sanitation, color theory, skin conditions, health and safety of clients, product chemistry, and basic tools and equipment to perform services on clients for every day and special occasions, along with state laws/regulations.
7831 Advanced Makeup Artistry (Level 2) (Capstone) This is the capstone or advanced course of a multi-level hour program (300 of 600 clock hours). In this advanced or capstone course students will learn advanced techniques, products, and equipment for makeup applications for fashion, specialty, high definition, photography, theatrical or stage, special effects for film/TV makeup applications. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in Introductory Make Artistry (Level 1).
7832 Introduction to Barbering This is the Intro level course of a multi-level hour program (180 of 1500 clock hours). This introductory course gives the students a comprehensive career opportunities and industry skills into barbering within this pathway. Students will learn state laws/regulations, basic barbering concepts, health/safety regulations, licensing requirements for California, tools, products, and equipment used in barbering services.
7833 Intermediate Level 2 Barbering (Concentrator) This course continues with the multi-level hour program (360 of 1500 clock hours). In this intermediate level 2 course students will continue to learn the theoretical and practical skills needed in barbering through the equipment, products, and techniques. Chemistry, haircutting, chemical services, shaving, and other components will be covered. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in the Intro to Barbering.
7834 Intermediate Level 3 Barbering (Concentrator) This course continues with the multi-level hour program (540 of 1500 clock hours). In this concentrator level 3 course students will continue to develop and advance their skills in the practicum of barbering skills with tools, equipment, and products. Continued theoretical concepts in Barbering and preparing for state board licensure in California will be covered. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in the Intermediate – Level 2 Barbering.
7835 Advanced Level 4 Barbering  (Capstone) This is the capstone or advanced level 4 course in the multi-level hour program (540 of 1500 clock hours) Students will prepare for state board licensure examination in California through theoretical and applied skills in hair styles, cutting, chemical services (i.e., bleaching, color, perms, and relaxers), facial care including shaving, health and safety for clients, disinfection/sanitation, and more for real world barbering skills. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better is the Concentrator – Level 3 Barbering.
7836 Introduction to Cosmetology This is the Intro level course of a multi-level hour program (180 of 1600 clock hours). This introductory course gives the students a comprehensive career opportunities and industry skills into cosmetology within this pathway. Students will learn state laws/regulations, basic cosmetology concepts, health/safety regulations, licensing requirements for California, tools, products, and equipment used in cosmetology services.
7837 Intermediate Level 2 Cosmetology (Concentrator) This course continues with the multi-level hour program (360 of 1600 clock hours). In this intermediate level 2 course students will continue to learn the theoretical and practical skills needed in cosmetology through the equipment, products, and techniques. Chemistry, haircutting, chemical services, shaving, and other components will be covered. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in the Intro to Cosmetology.
7838 Intermediate Level 3 Cosmetology (Concentrator) This course continues with the multi-level hour program (540 of 1600 clock hours). In this concentrator level 3 course students will continue to develop and advance their skills in the practicum of cosmetology skills with tools, equipment, and products. Continued theoretical concepts in Cosmetology and preparing for state board licensure in California will be covered. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in the Intermediate – Level 2 Cosmetology.
7839 Advanced Level 4 Cosmetology  This is the capstone or advanced level 4 course in the multi-level hour program (540 of 1600 clock hours) Students will prepare for state board licensure examination in California through theoretical and applied skills in hair styles, cutting, chemical services (i.e., bleaching, color, perms, and relaxers), facial care including waxing, health and safety for clients, disinfection/sanitation, and more for real world cosmetology skills. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better is the Concentrator – Level 3 Cosmetology.
7840 Intermediate Level 1 Manicuring (Concentrator) This is the introductory/intermediate level course of a multi-level hour program (150 of 400 clock hours). The introductory course gives the students a comprehensive career opportunities and introductory skills in manicuring or nail technology. Services in this level cover basic manicuring, pedicures, sanitation, color theory, nail conditions, health and safety of clients, product chemistry, and basic tools and equipment to perform services on clients for every day and special occasions, including state laws/regulations for licensure preparation.
7841 Advanced Level 2 Manicuring (Capstone) This is the capstone or advanced course of a multi-level hour program (300 of 400 clock hours). In this advanced or capstone course students will learn advanced techniques, products, and equipment for manicuring or nail technology in natural and artificial nail applications for fashion, specialty, high definition, photography, theatrical or stage, special effects for film/TV makeup applications. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in Introductory Manicuring (Level 1).
7900 Introduction to Health Science and Medical Technology This Exploratory/Introduction to Health Science and Medical Technology course provides students with the awareness of a variety of career options examining careers that work diagnostic, supportive, and therapeutic services and the requirements to achieve their career goals. Exploratory courses provide the foundational concepts in which students can begin to form future career choices that meet their individual career interest. Students are exposed to the general requirements for various careers in the healthcare field. Exploratory courses provide the basic experiences and activities that will set a foundation for entry into any one of the Health Science and Medical Technology pathways at introductory level courses.
7910 Introduction to Biotechnology This introductory course is designed to provide students the necessary foundational technical skills of Health Sciences and integrated subject matter in science, mathematics, and English/language arts required to move to advanced curriculum and content in Health Science and Medical Technology. Student will have the opportunity to experience a variety of options leading to the broad career selection of a specific pathways with in Health Science and Medical Technology. Students will learn about the use of living systems and organisms to develop or make products, or "any technological application that uses biological systems, living organisms or derivatives thereof, to make or modify products or processes for specific use in Biotechnology.
7911 Intermediate Biotechnology (Concentrator) This concentrator course is designed to provide students specific content knowledge and skills within the Biotechnology pathway. Courses are aligned to the basic knowledge levels necessary to learn and recognize word roots, prefixes, and suffixes used in medical language, understand the prevention, wellness, and disease process, and the associated skill application consistent with the Biotechnology pathways scope and practice in either direct or indirect client/patient services including short term certifications such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and automated external defilation.
7912 Advanced Biotechnology (Capstone) This capstone course prepares students within a specific career in the various areas of Biotechnology that will enable them to complete the requirements for licensure, certification, or other industry recognized credentials; or students are prepared to enter into postsecondary education or training programs in the selected Biotechnology pathway. If applicable, course content will provide the knowledge and skills consistent with legislative requirements and the level of proficiency to perform skills within their identified scope of practice specific to employment.
7920 Introduction to Patient Care This Introductory course is designed to provide students the necessary foundational technical skills of Health Sciences and integrated subject matter in science, mathematics, and English/language arts required to move to advanced curriculum and content in Health Science and Medical Technology. Students have the opportunity to experience a variety of options leading to the broad career selection of a specific pathways with in Health Science and Medical Technology. Student will be introduced to the requirements of working in patient care careers, understanding all aspects of the interactions and responsibilities in working with people in diagnostic and therapeutic areas of health care.
7921 Intermediate Patient Care (Concentrator) This concentrator course is designed to provide students specific content knowledge with industry skills and leadership development within the Patient Care pathway. Courses are aligned to the basic knowledge levels necessary to learn and recognize word roots, prefixes, and suffixes used in medical language, understand the prevention, wellness, and disease process, and the associated skill application consistent with the Patient Care pathways scope and practice in either direct or indirect client/patient services including short term certifications such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and automated external defilation.
7922 Advanced Patient Care (Capstone) This capstone course prepares students within a specific career in the various areas of patient care that will enable them to complete the requirements for licensure, certification, or other industry recognized credentials; or students are prepared to enter into postsecondary education or training programs in the selected Patient Care pathway. If applicable, course content will provide the knowledge, industry skills and leadership development consistent with legislative requirements and the level of proficiency to perform skills within their identified scope of practice specific to employment.
7930 Introduction to Healthcare Administrative Services This introductory course is designed to provide students the necessary foundational technical skills of Health Sciences and integrated subject matter in science, mathematics, and English/language arts required to move to advanced curriculum and content in Health Science and Medical Technology. Student will have the opportunity to experience a variety of options leading to the broad career selection of a specific pathways with in Health Science and Medical Technology. Students will be exposed to the knowledge and skills necessary to communicate health/medical information accurately within legal/regulatory bounds, information coding and systems, health care operations and human resources.
7931 Intermediate Healthcare Administrative Services (Concentrator) This concentrator course is designed to provide students specific content knowledge and skills within the Healthcare Administrative Services pathway. Courses are aligned to the basic knowledge levels necessary to learn and recognize word roots, prefixes, and suffixes used in medical language, understand the prevention, wellness, and disease process, and the associated skill application consistent with the Healthcare Administrative Services pathways scope and practice in either direct or indirect client/patient services including short term certifications such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and automated external defilation.
7932 Advanced Healthcare Administrative Services (Capstone) This capstone course prepares students within a specific career in the various areas of Healthcare Administrative Services that will enable them to complete the requirements for licensure, certification, or other industry recognized credentials; or students are prepared to enter into postsecondary education or training programs in the selected Healthcare Administrative Services pathway. If applicable, course content will provide the knowledge and skills consistent with legislative requirements and the level of proficiency to perform skills within their identified scope of practice specific to employment.
7940 Introduction to Healthcare Operational Support Services This introductory course is designed to provide students the necessary foundational technical skills of Health Sciences and integrated subject matter in science, mathematics, and English/language arts required to move to advanced curriculum and content in Health Science and Medical Technology. Student will have the opportunity to experience a variety of options leading to the broad career selection of a specific pathways with in Health Science and Medical Technology. Students will learn about supportive services occurring in hospital, clinics and other healthcare delivery facilities that include healthy and safe physical environmental services, infection prevention processes and technology, quick and efficient transports, equipment maintenance, materials, and food services.
7941 Intermediate Healthcare Operational Support (Concentrator) This concentrator course is designed to provide students specific content knowledge and skills within the Mental and Behavioral Health pathway. Courses are aligned to the basic knowledge levels necessary to learn and recognize word roots, prefixes, and suffixes used in medical language, understand the prevention, wellness, and disease process, and the associated skill application consistent with the Mental and Behavioral Health pathways scope and practice in either direct or indirect client/patient services including short term certifications such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and automated external defilation.
7942 Advanced Healthcare Operational Support (Capstone) This capstone course prepares students within a specific career in the various areas of Healthcare Operational Support that will enable them to complete the requirements for licensure, certification, or other industry recognized credentials; or students are prepared to enter into postsecondary education or training programs in the selected Healthcare Operational Support pathway. If applicable, course content will provide the knowledge and skills consistent with legislative requirements and the level of proficiency to perform skills within their identified scope of practice specific to employment.
7950 Introduction to Public and Community Health This introductory course is designed to provide students the necessary foundational technical skills of Health Sciences and integrated subject matter in science, mathematics, and English/language arts required to move to advanced curriculum and content in Health Science and Medical Technology. Student will have the opportunity to experience a variety of options leading to the broad career selection of a specific pathways with in Health Science and Medical Technology. Student will be introduced to understand the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting health through organized efforts, informed choices of society, organizations, public and private, communities and individuals. Public heal occupations look at the concerns and threats to health based on population health analysis.
7951 Intermediate Public and Community Health (Concentrator) This concentrator course is designed to provide students specific content knowledge and skills within the Public and Community Health pathway. Courses are aligned to the basic knowledge levels necessary to learn and recognize word roots, prefixes, and suffixes used in medical language, understand the prevention, wellness, and disease process, and the associated skill application consistent with the Public and Community Health pathways scope and practice in either direct or indirect client/patient services including short term certifications such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and automated external defilation.
7952 Advanced Public and Community Health (Capstone) This capstone course provides students within a specific careers in the various areas of Public and Community Health that will enable them to complete the requirements for licensure, certification, or other industry recognized credentials; or students are prepared to enter into postsecondary education or training programs in the selected Mental and Behavioral Health pathway. If applicable, course content will provide the knowledge and skills consistent with legislative requirements and the level of proficiency to perform skills within their identified scope of practice specific to employment.
7960 Introduction to Mental and Behavioral Health This introductory course is designed to provide students the necessary foundational technical skills of Health Sciences and integrated subject matter in science, mathematics, and English/language arts required to move to advanced curriculum and content in Health Science and Medical Technology. Student will have the opportunity to experience a variety of options leading to the broad career selection of a specific pathways with in Health Science and Medical Technology. Student will be introduced to the requirements of working in mental and behavioral health occupations, understanding, diagnosis and treatment of an individual’s emotional, psychological, and social aspect of maintaining and or achieving wellness.
7961 Intermediate Mental and Behavioral Health (Concentrator) This concentrator course is designed to provide students specific content knowledge and skills within the Mental and Behavioral Health pathway. Courses are aligned to the basic knowledge levels necessary to learn and recognize word roots, prefixes, and suffixes used in medical language, understand the prevention, wellness, and disease process, and the associated skill application consistent with the Mental and Behavioral Health pathways scope and practice in either direct or indirect client/patient services including short term certifications such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and automated external defilation.
7962 Advanced Mental and Behavioral Health (Capstone) This capstone course prepares students within a specific career in the various areas of Mental and Behavioral Health that will enable them to complete the requirements for licensure, certification, or other industry recognized credentials; or students are prepared to enter into postsecondary education or training programs in the selected Mental and Behavioral Health pathway. If applicable, course content will provide the knowledge and skills consistent with legislative requirements and the level of proficiency to perform skills within their identified scope of practice specific to employment.
8000 Introduction to Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreation This introductory course in the Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreation sector is the first in a sequence of courses that provides instruction in the eight content areas of Family and Consumer Sciences. The focus is on preparing students for personal and life management, and providing a strong foundation for Family and Consumer Sciences education related career paths. Instruction in the content areas of child development and guidance; consumer education; family and human development; education; fashion, textiles, and apparel; food and nutrition; housing and furnishings; individual and family health; and leadership is designed to prepare students with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to function effectively as family members, leaders, workers, and citizens.
8010 Intermediate Food Science, Dietetics, and Nutrition (Concentrator) This concentration course includes instruction in researching information to evaluate an individual's diet, and adequacy of essential nutrients supplied in the diet; physiology and utilization of nutrients by the body; contribution of nutrients to general health; dietary needs during the life cycle; food regulations by government agencies; impact of additives, environmental contaminants, food-borne illnesses, food faddism and quackery; cultural factors in food choices; new food technology; and the chemical and biological relation of food. This course provides a strong background for nutritional science, dietetics, as well as careers related to the food industry.
8011 Advanced Food Science, Dietetics, and Nutrition (Capstone) This capstone course prepares students for employment in occupations in the food science and technology, dietetics, and nutrition industries. Instruction includes meeting nutritional and dietary needs; planning, selecting, purchasing and preparing of food to conserve nutrients; operational procedures; food safety and sanitation; using dietary and food guidelines to plan healthy diets; food preferences; data and statistics; and marketing. Students develop skills to utilize nutritional knowledge in preparing, inspecting, and serving meals to people with special counseling under the direction of a dietetic technician or professional dietitian; identifying qualities of various foods; collecting and testing food samples as directed; recording and comparing test results; purchasing and maintaining laboratory supplies and inventory.
8020 Intermediate Food Service and Hospitality (Concentrator) This concentration course prepares students to understand the scientific principles of nutrition, the relationship of nutrition to health and well-being, and also prepares students with food production, preparation, and service skills. Instruction includes topics such as finding nutritive food values; planning, selecting, storing, purchasing, preparing, testing, serving and selling of quality food and food products; nutrition and health; safety and emergencies; food safety and sanitation; meal management; food preparation; food purchasing; food in culture; the science of food and nutrition; food costs and production; and food technology. This course provides a solid background for a wide range of careers such as food service and hospitality, food science, dietetics, and nutrition.
8021 Advanced Food Service and Hospitality (Capstone) This capstone course prepares students for employment in occupations in the food science and technology, dietetics, and nutrition industries. Instruction includes meeting nutritional and dietary needs; planning, selecting, purchasing and preparing of food to conserve nutrients; operational procedures; food safety and sanitation; using dietary and food guidelines to plan healthy diets; food preferences; data and statistics; and marketing. Students develop skills to utilize nutritional knowledge in preparing, inspecting, and serving meals to people with special counseling under the direction of a dietetic technician or professional dietitian; identifying qualities of various foods; collecting and testing food samples as directed; recording and comparing test results; purchasing and maintaining laboratory supplies and inventory.
8030 Intermediate Hospitality, Tourism and Recreation (Concentrator) This concentration course prepares students for employment in occupations in hospitality, tourism, and recreation. Instruction includes providing hospitality services in diverse settings to meet the needs of a wide variety of clients; eco-tourism; guest services; geography of the continents; customs and culture of countries as tourist destinations; special documentation needed for international travel; planning events to client specifications; recreational opportunities related to on-site and off-site attractions; and environmental and ecological principles.
8031 Advanced Hospitality, Tourism and Recreation (Capstone) This capstone course prepares students with the skills, attitudes, and knowledge needed for employment in the lodging industry, travel-related service occupations, and/or theme parks, attractions, outdoor recreation, and exhibitions and event-planning. Topics covered include lodging terminology; the history of lodging; marketing; property management; guest psychology and relationships; lodging operations; food and beverage services; convention services; business management; industry awareness and policies; security and emergency procedures; salesmanship and guest satisfaction; computer applications; geography; culture and customs; reservations and ticketing; travel itineraries; international travel; and technology used in the industry. Additional instruction could include trade shows, fairs, and conferences; outdoor recreation and management; financial transactions; tourism; client information and planning specialized events to include themes, timelines, budgets, target audiences, objectives, agendas and public relations related to support services within the lodging industry. This program provides a strong background for careers in Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreation, as well as Lodging and Hotel Operations, and/or Theme Parks, Attractions, and Events.
8100 Introduction to Information and Communication Technologies This course provides students with foundational knowledge of programming and computer science. Students will explore topics of human computer interaction, problem solving, web design, computer programming, data modeling, and robotics. Throughout the course, students will understand the algorithmic underpinnings of computer applications and gain technical expertise using computational tools. Other areas of the sector could be introduced such as software design, networking, game design, information support, and topics like artificial intelligence, and robotics. Social issues in ICT will be introduced such as hacking and cybersecurity, social media usage and protecting personal information, the digital divide, open government data, and ethical computing. Course titles may also include: Exploring Computer Science, Introduction to Computer Science A; Computer Principles; Introduction to Information and Communication Technologies; Introduction to Computer Technologies.
8110 Introduction to Information Support Services This course will introduce students to computer usage and functionality, operating systems, the main system components, network connectivity, software installation, data backup, trouble-shooting, and system administration. The role of ICT in organizations and business processes using tools such as organizational charts, flowcharts, and timelines will be discussed. Client relations and communications will be introduced along with information gathering techniques, and critical thinking and listening as part of problem solving.
8111 Intermediate Information Support Services (Concentrator) This course is project-based and designed to provide students with hands-on use of software applications while studying computer concepts such as accessing and transmitting information in a networked environment. Students will learn the processes associated with system administration and planning, acquiring, installing, and implementing of software and systems. Learning to work in teams in order to understand client needs, evaluate different possible solutions, pricing systems within budget constraints, and understanding continual improvement cycles are goals.
8112 Advanced Information Support Services (Capstone) This course allows students to demonstrate management and implementation of various information, technology, and communication projects. Projects could take the form of enterprise information security plans that include identifying vulnerabilities and deciding what methods to use to achieve cybersecurity. Other projects include developing user training programs to enable simple problem resolutions, help-desk programs, system life-cycle programs that include planning, purchasing, implementing, and integrating of systems for continual improvement.
8120 Introduction to Networking This course introduces students to networking terminology and concepts as well as the principles of networking and various technologies, models, and protocols used in networking. Various types of network media and topologies will be introduced as well as network devices and their functions. Concepts covered include network standards of recognized organizations, Open System Interconnect (OSI) network layers, and transmission-control/internet protocol (TCP/IP) and the various network environments.
8121 Intermediate Networking (Concentrator) This course allows students to perform hands-on tasking and planning for implementing network systems and/or subsystems after receiving safety training handling network hardware and power supplies. Students will evaluate networking tasks and select network components, media, and protocols to solve networking challenges. Other skills learned include network addressing, configuring, troubleshooting, security, monitoring network traffic and reading system indicators to troubleshoot problems, network administration and accounts, and system backup
8122 Advanced Networking (Capstone) This course allows students to demonstrate network administration and management skills in various networking projects. Possible projects include implementing network security tools to identify network vulnerabilities and performing network security penetration testing, assessment, proposing resolutions, and forming security plans for implementation. Other projects include identifying network threats to cyber security and plans for disaster prevention and recovery, analyzing client networking needs and requirements and developing possible alternatives to meet client needs.
8130 Introduction to Systems Programming This course will introduce the systems development process to students. Topics covered include the development life cycle, development models, specifications and requirements, working in development teams, use of versions, and diagramming processes using flowcharts and Unified Modeling Language.
8131 Intermediate Systems Programming (Concentrator) This course provides students with the fundamental knowledge of computer programming for solving applied problems. Topics covered include using various programming languages, protocols, language syntax, data structures, object oriented concepts, interfaces, sorting and searching algorithms, and developing reports. Also covered, software testing, debugging, and improvement, integrated development using object-oriented programming and sensory information from robots to solve problems and meet challenges integrating STEM subjects.
8132 Advanced Systems Programming (Capstone) This course emphasizes object-oriented programming methodology with a concentration on problem solving and algorithm development. Students apply discrete programming skills to make a video game, a virtual pet, a sound editor, etc. and will explore careers in programming, including wireless applications for iPhone, Android, and applications. It also includes the study of data structures, design, and abstraction. Other topics might include developing databases and data modeling.
8133 Introduction to Web and Social Media Programming and Design This course will introduce students to the integration of various media into programming assignments including Web assignments. Students will also be introduced to the basic design elements used in interactive media. Other topics include encoding methods, using media design and editing software, animation and drawing software as well as image editors and three-dimensional design. Online content delivery process will be outlined as well as establishing online presence and e-commerce capabilities and Web security. Simple coding assignments using HTML and Cascading Style Sheets are used to teach basic Web design including the use of images, hyperlinks, tables, forms, video and audio.
8134 Intermediate Web and Social Media Programming and Design (Concentrator) This course allows students to work on various projects such as Web-based businesses, e-portfolios, and mobile apps. Students will learn to create multimedia productions and presentations, implement standard graphical programming techniques for object movement, create graphical user interfaces, and apply graphic design principles and visual communication techniques. Other topics include capturing images by developing camera skills and making choices lenses, depth, motion and lighting, developing digitally generated and enhanced media, modeling, simulation, animation and image retouching.
8135 Advanced Web and Social Media Programming and Design (Capstone) This course allows students to produce multimedia projects from concept (content gathering/research) to project completion (authoring/transmission) taking into account media that would be used by enterprises or mobile apps for marketing, corporate communication, and public use. As part of these projects students produce professional-level media, images, documents, audio, and video clips and software. Some projects might include Artificial Intelligence methods and behaviors to create web robots (bots) such as chat bots, etc.
8140 Introduction to Games and Simulation This course introduces students to the history, art, and science of game development and the unique differences between automated versus non-automated gaming. Students will be introduced to game and simulation analysis, design, documentation, and development tools.
8141 Intermediate Games and Simulation (Concentrator) This course allows students to work in teams to develop games or simulations. Students will learn skills such as storyboarding, plot, flow, and using functions. Learning how to implement standard game/simulation strategy and rules of play as well as integrating mixed media appropriate to the game design/simulation will be included. Other topics include design specifications, delivery, rules of play, navigation functionality, scoring, and other special features.
8142 Advanced Games and Simulation (Capstone) This course allows students to learn and display mastery of advanced game design/simulation skills in projects they design individually or in teams. Advanced skills include applying programming skills for rendering single player or multiuser games or simulation projects, program control, branching, memory management, strategies, and implementation. Using Artificial Intelligence techniques such as finite state machines in nonplayer characters could be included.
8200 Introduction to Manufacturing and Product Development This introduction course provides students with the foundational concepts required for pursuing career pathways within this industry sector. The skills and content knowledge helps prepare students to continue their education in multiple pathway concentrator courses within this industry sector.
8210 Intermediate Graphic Production Technologies (Concentrator) This concentrator course builds upon the Manufacturing and Product Development introduction course and provides students with additional concepts and experiences required for career readiness and pursuing further education in the Graphic Production career pathway, which precedes this pathway's capstone course. This concentrator course leads to the capstone course in the Graphic Production pathway's sequence of courses.
8211 Advanced Graphic Production Technologies (Capstone) This capstone course further builds upon the Manufacturing and Product Development introduction course and pathway concentrator course in the industry sector and is the final course taken in a sequence of courses which prepares students to work and pursue further education in multiple career pathways. This career technical education capstone course provides content, skill development and leadership training which prepare students for the world of work and to pursue further education such as industry certifications and a postsecondary degree.
8220 Intermediate Machining and Forming Technologies (Concentrator) This concentrator course builds upon the Manufacturing and Product Development introduction course and provides students with additional concepts and experiences required for career readiness and pursuing further education in the Machining and Forming Technologies career pathway, which precedes this pathway's capstone course. This concentrator course leads to the capstone course in the Machining and Forming Technologies pathway's sequence of courses.
8221 Advanced Machining and Forming Technologies (Capstone) This capstone course further builds upon the Manufacturing and Product Development introduction course and provides students with additional concepts and experiences required for career readiness and pursuing further education in Machining and Forming Technologies career pathway, which precedes this pathway's capstone course. This career technical education capstone course provides content, skill development and leadership training which prepare students for the world of work and to pursue further education such as industry certifications and a postsecondary degree.
8230 Intermediate Welding and Materials Joining (Concentrator) This concentrator course builds upon the Manufacturing and Product Development introduction course and provides students with additional concepts and experiences required for career readiness and pursuing further education in Welding and Materials Joining career pathway, which precedes this pathway's capstone course. This concentrator course leads to the capstone course in the Welding and Materials Joining pathway's sequence of courses.
8231 Advanced Welding and Materials Joining (Capstone) This capstone course further builds upon the Manufacturing and Product Development introduction and the Welding and Materials Joining concentrator courses. This career technical education capstone course provides content, skill development and leadership training which prepare students for the world of work and to pursue further education such as industry certifications and a postsecondary degree.
8240 Intermediate Product Innovation and Design (Concentrator) This concentrator course builds upon the Manufacturing and Product Development introduction course and provides students with additional concepts and experiences required for career readiness and pursuing further education in Product Innovation and Design career pathway, which precedes this pathway's capstone course. This concentrator course leads to the capstone course in the Product Innovation and Design pathway's sequence of courses.
8241 Advanced Product Innovation and Design (Capstone) This capstone course further builds upon the Manufacturing and Product Development introduction and the Product Innovation and Design concentrator courses. This career technical education capstone course provides content, skill development and leadership training which prepare students for the world of work and to pursue further education such as industry certifications and a postsecondary degree.
8300 Introduction to Marketing, Sales, and Service This course content includes foundational concepts for each of the three pathways within the Marketing, Sales, and Services Sector including Entrepreneurship, Marketing, and Professional Sales. Subject matter includes market research, economics, marketing budgets, creative development and design, and marketing foundations/functions with emphasis on public relations, advertising, branding, promotion, product/service management, pricing and distribution.
8310 Intermediate Marketing (Concentrator) This concentrator course content builds on Introduction to Marketing, Sales, and Service course content. Specialized programs of study in this field may include sports marketing, hospitality marketing, advertising or market research. Students demonstrate the acquisition of content through the development of marketing plans and campaigns.
8311 Advanced Marketing (Capstone) This capstone course content builds on previous course content and may focus on advanced strategies and marketing concepts that culminate in this final course of the Marketing pathway sequence. Specialized programs of study in this field may include sports marketing, hospitality marketing, and advertising or market research.
8320 Intermediate Professional Sales (Concentrator) This concentrator course content builds on Introduction to Marketing, Sales, and Service content. Knowledge and skills in theory and practice of sales designed to provide a professional foundation to those involved in personal selling careers, including the fundamentals of personal selling with an emphasis on customer behavior, persuasive presentation of ideas, products and services, and developing sales goals are covered. Students demonstrate the acquisition of content through the development of sales forecasts, presentations, etc. to drive sales activities.
8321 Advanced Professional Sales (Capstone) This capstone course content builds on previous course content and may focus on advanced strategies and Professional Sales concepts that culminate in this final course of the Professional Sales pathway sequence.
8330 Entrepreneurship/Self-Employment (Concentrator) This concentrator course content builds on Introduction to Marketing, Sales, and Service course content. Knowledge and skills common to entrepreneurs and entrepreneurship, including the human characteristics vital for entrepreneurial thinking in a twenty-first century global world are covered. Entrepreneurial thinking may be applied to all industry sectors. Business knowledge and skills required for entrepreneurs as well as intangible skills and knowledge such as creativity and innovation skills are developed. Students demonstrate the acquisition of content through the research and development of business plans.
8331 Advanced Entrepreneurship/Self-Employment (Capstone) This capstone course content builds on previous course content and may focus on advanced strategies and Entrepreneurial concepts that culminate in this final course of the Advanced Entrepreneurship/Self-Employment pathway sequence.
8400 Introduction to Public Services This introduction course provides students with the awareness of a variety of career options and the foundational concepts in which they can begin to form future career choices that meet their individual career interest. Students are exposed to the specific requirements for various careers in the Emergency Response, Legal Practices, Public Safety, and the academic, physical and civic responsibility to achieve their career goals in a service career. Introductory courses provide the basic experiences and activities and leadership development that will set a foundation for entry into any one of the Public Services pathways at introductory level courses.
8410 Introduction to Public Safety (Introduction) This course introduces theories, principals, and techniques used in occupations that fall under the heading of Public Safety including police, corrections, and homeland security. Policies, procedures, and skills needed in services that provide for the safety and security of people and property and prevention of theft and damage are included.
8411 Intermediate Public Safety (Concentration) This course includes intermediate academic and skill development courses that describe the role of specific careers in Public Safety, including of science in solving crimes using an evidence-based system. Topics could include the history and role of the agency, laboratory and scientific evidence, processing evidence, establishing hypotheses and drawing conclusions. Students will also explore various career opportunities for decision making to move onto advanced coursework.
8412 Advanced Public Safety (Capstone) This course is designed to prepare individuals for specific careers or jobs in Public Safety such as law enforcement, homeland security, and corrections. Content of these various courses would contain the essential knowledge and skill development of that specific career. Students will learn about the specific organizational structure of the oversite agency, laws regulations and policy for specific agencies, state laws and guidelines for career entry as well as certification hours, skill proficiency and employment requirement for the specific career in Public Safety. Students develop the skills both academically and physically to meet the demands of the specific career, the understanding of the importance of having a clean background check and the understanding of ethic, morals, and service to the community. Students will have to opportunity to participate in workplace learning, prepare for postsecondary options and qualify to take examinations and certification as set forth by California State regulation and agency requirements of age, skill, and knowledge.
8420 Introduction to Emergency Response (Introduction) This course is the introductory course in the Emergency Response Pathway and provides students with decision making information about careers in Emergency Response careers or to pursue advanced skill training in Emergency Services. Course content includes classroom instruction, hands-on training and community experience. This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the variety of agencies, employment opportunities and necessary skill requirements in the many career in Emergency Services. Information included will be will be in the field of fire and emergency operations, disaster response and emergency management, latest industry principles, theory, and best practices. Students learn tactical operations, safety, leadership, and community outreach and response techniques.
8421 Intermediate Emergency Response (Concentration) This course provides students with an outline of the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) system, state and community emergency systems, introduces students to environment citizen emergency assessment, skill development, as well as provides pathophysiology and immediate action and care for various emergencies. It covers techniques of emergency environmental, community action and medical care presently considered within the responsibilities of the first responders, fires service careers, and emphasizes the development of student skills in recognition of symptoms of illnesses and injuries and proper procedures of emergency care. Emphasis is placed on communication, operations, community action and patient care in accordance with the California State EMS Agencies
8422 Advanced Emergency Response (Capstone) This course is designed to prepare individuals for specific careers or jobs in Emergency Services. Content of these various courses would contain the essential knowledge and skill development of that specific career. Students will learn about the specific organizational structure of the oversite agency, laws regulations and policy for specific agencies, state laws and guidelines for career entry as well as certification hours, skill proficiency and employment requirement for the specific career in Emergency Services. Students will have the opportunity to participate in workplace learning, prepare for postsecondary options and qualify to take examinations and certification as set forth by California State regulation and agency requirement of age, skill, and knowledge.
8430 Introduction to Legal Practices (Introduction) This course allows students to survey the range of legal careers including paralegals, attorneys, social justice advocates, mediators, and other occupations. The course provides students with a basis for understanding the American political and legal systems, with a focus on legal ideas and the legal process, how the law works and the sources of US law. Legal research and writing are introduced.
8431 Intermediate Legal Practices (Concentration) This concentrator course is designed to provide students specific content knowledge with industry skills and leadership development within the Legal Practices pathways. Courses are designed to provide an understating and application of laws that affect everyday life; families, business, social decision making and the relationship to policies. Course could include content knowledge within historical, philosophical, and institutional contexts of social and economic justice and human rights.
8432 Advanced Legal Practices (Capstone) This capstone course allows students to examine how statutes and policies are developed to safeguard society throughout history and the relationship to today legal practices. Students will understand the analysis of civil rights and liberties, and the ways courts and legislators deal with constitutional questions. Student will develop the skill and knowledge relevant to the needs of modern legal practice, entry into legal practice careers, necessary pathways and preparation into postsecondary advancement and future job prospects and the progression to higher level careers in Legal Practices.
8500 Introduction to Transportation This course includes foundational concepts required for pursuing further education in each of the three pathways within the transportation sector including: Operations, Structural Repair and Refinishing, and Systems Diagnostics, Service, and Repair. Instructional content of this course may lead the student directly into an intermediate pathway course within the transportation sector.
8510 Introduction to Operations This introductory course will offer first year students a unique perspective of the role the transportation industry has on the global economy. Students will be made aware of the range or diversity of employment opportunities available within this pathway such as the distribution, logistics, and warehousing of goods, materials and mass transit. The student will also be made aware of all the forms of transportation necessary to achieve these efforts.
8511 Intermediate Operations (Concentrator) This concentrator level course provides more specific areas of focus such as planning, management, and the infrastructure required for the distribution and logistics of materials and products. The instruction will also concentrate on operating and managing facilities designed for the movement of goods, materials and mass transit.
8512 Advanced Operations (Capstone) This capstone course will provide students with the opportunity to function in a variety of roles within this pathway. Students will demonstrate competency in the knowledge and skills acquired in introductory and concentration level courses. Students will participate in work-based learning opportunities which can lead to internships. Students that successfully complete the course of study will qualify for industry recognized certifications. Upon completion of this course, students will be prepared for an entry level position at a facility that provides the movement of goods, materials, and/or mass transit.
8520 Introduction to Structural Repair and Refinishing This introductory course will offer first year students a unique perspective of the skills and knowledge required for a entry level position in the structural repair and refinishing sector of the transportation industry. The instruction will concentrate on the fundamentals of collision repair and refinishing of motor driven vehicles. This will include an introduction to panel repair, sanding, taping, masking, and painting. Spot, MIG, and Oxy/Acetylene welding will be introduced. Safety and proper tool use and identification is stressed.
8521 Intermediate Structural Repair and Refinishing (Concentrator) This concentrator level course will build on the knowledge and skills obtained in the introductory level course. This course provides more specific areas of focus such as proficiency in spot and MIG welding, full panel replacement and preparation as well as painting and refinishing. The student will also become familiar with the entire repair process from estimation through to final fit and finish. Students will also become familiar with interior, upholstery, and detailing work.
8522 Advanced Structural Repair and Refinishing (Capstone) This capstone level course will provide students with the opportunity to function in a variety of roles within this pathway. Students will demonstrate competency in the skills and knowledge acquired in introductory and concentration level courses. Students will participate in work-based learning opportunities which can lead to internships. Students that successfully complete the course of study will qualify for industry recognized certifications. Upon completion of this course, students will be prepared for an entry level position at a vehicle collision and refinishing facility.
8530 Introduction to Systems Diagnostics, Service, and Repair This introductory course will offer first year students a unique perspective of the skills and knowledge required for an entry level position in the systems diagnostics, service, and repair of vehicles of the twenty first century. The instruction will concentrate on but will not limited to the fundamentals of shop safety, tool identification and proper use along with basic repairs and maintenance of modern vehicles.
8531 Intermediate Systems Diagnostics, Service, and Repair (Concentrator) This concentrator level course provides more specific areas of focus such as system diagnosis, advanced service, maintenance, and repair. The instruction will also concentrate on support systems such as engine performance, braking, steering, cooling, and electrical/electronic components. The student will also be exposed to transmissions and differentials.
8532 Advanced Systems Diagnostics, Service, and Repair (Capstone) This capstone level course will provide students with the opportunity to function in a variety of roles within this pathway. Students will demonstrate competency in the skills and knowledge acquired in introductory and concentration level courses. Students will participate in work-based learning opportunities which can lead to internships. Students that successfully complete the course of study will qualify for industry recognized certifications. Upon completion of this course, students will be prepared for an entry level position at a vehicle repair facility.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
A Associate This is an Associate degree. The degree could be an AA, AS, AAS (Associate of Applied Sciences), or ASN (Associate of Science Nursing). The degree is indicated on the transcripts submitted by the applicant and the exact degree will vary by institution. We refer to the degree in general terms as an Associate degree.
B Baccalaureate The same applies to the Baccalaureate degree as with the Associate degree. This may be a BA, BS, Bachelor of Education, Bachelor of Music, etc. We refer to the degree in general terms as a Bachelor's degree.
C Baccalaureate Plus 30 A Bachelor's Degree plus 30 or more additional semester units.
D Doctorate This is a Doctorate degree. This may be a Ph.D., Ed.D., M.D., etc. We refer to the degree in general terms as a Doctorate degree.
F Fifth Year This is used primarily with out-of-state or out-of-country trained educators who have completed a minimum of 30 semester units of graduate level course work after the completion of the bachelor's degree and without being granted a Master's degree. We consider the completion of the 30 semester units as a Fifth Year of Study.
M Master The same applies to the Master's degree as with the Associate and Bachelor's degree. This may be a MA, MS, Master of Education, etc. We refer to them in general terms as a Master's degree.
N None No degree indicated on the transcripts submitted.
S Special The Special Degree is used to indicate the completion of a Juris Doctor degree.
U Fifth Year within BA The Fifth Year within the BA (BS, Bachelor of Education, Bachelor of Music, etc. are also applicable) is primarily used with out-of-state or out-of-country educators to indicate the completion of a minimum of 150 semester units of course work completed within the bachelor's degree program. Individuals who have completed the 150 semester units of course work within the bachelor's degree are considered to have completed the equivalent of the Fifth Year of Study.
V Master Plus 30 A Master's Degree plus 30 or more additional semester units.
Y Fifth Year Induction The Fifth Year Induction is used to indicate that the individual has completed an induction program through an approved induction program sponsor.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
200 None There is no secondary disability.
210 Intellectual Disability (ID) Intellectual Disability means significantly subaverage general intellectual functioning, existing concurrently with deficits in adaptive behavior, and manifested during the developmental period, that adversely affects a child's educational performance. (34 CFR Sec. 300.8(c)(6)).
220 Hard of hearing (HH) Hard of Hearing means hearing, impairment, whether permanent or fluctuating, that adversely affects a child's educational performance, but that is not included under the definition of deaf in this section.
230 Deafness (DEAF)/Hearing impairment (HI) Deafness means a hearing impairment that is so severe that the child is impaired in processing linguistic information through learning, with or without amplification, which adversely affects educational performance. (34 CFR Sec. 300.8(c)(3) Hearing Impairment is a federal category of disability, which includes both hard of hearing and deaf individuals as defined above.
240 Speech or language impairment (SLI) Speech or Language Impairment means a communication disorder such as stuttering, impaired articulation, language impairment, or a voice impairment, that adversely affects a child's educational performance. (34 CFR Sec. 300.8(c)(11))
250 Visual impairment (VI) Visually Impaired, including blindness means impairment in vision that, even with correction, adversely affects a child's educational performance. The term includes both partially seeing and blind children. (34 CFR Sec. 300.8(c)(13)).
260 Emotional disturbance (ED) Emotional Disturbance means a condition exhibiting one or more of the following characteristics, over a long period of time and to a marked degree, that adversely affects educational performance: (A) An inability to learn which cannot be explained by intellectual, sensory, or health factors; (B) An inability to build or maintain satisfactory interpersonal relationships with peers and teachers; (C) Inappropriate types of behavior or feeling under normal circumstances; (D) A general pervasive mood of unhappiness or depression; or (E) A tendency to develop physical symptoms or fears associated with personal or school problems. The term (ED) includes schizophrenia. The term does not apply to children who are socially maladjusted, unless it is determined that they have an emotional disturbance. (34 CF Sec. 300.8(c)(4)).
270 Orthopedic impairment (OI) Orthopedic Impairment means a severe orthopedic impairment that adversely affects a child's educational performance. The term includes impairments caused by congenital anomaly (e.g., clubfoot, absence of some member, etc.), impairments caused by disease (e.g., poliomyelitis, bone tuberculosis, etc.), and impairments from other causes (e.g., cerebral palsy, amputations, and fractures or burns which cause contractures). (34 CFR Sec. 300.8(b)(6 Sec. 300.7(c)(8))
280 Other health impairment (OHI) Other Health Impairment means having limited strength, vitality or alertness, due to chronic or acute health problems such as a heart condition, tuberculosis, rheumatic fever, nephritis, asthma, sickle cell anemia, hemophilia, epilepsy, lead poisoning, leukemia, or diabetes, which adversely affects a child's educational performance. (34 CFR Sec 300.8 (c) (9)).
281 Established medical disability (EMD) A disabling medical condition or congenital syndrome that the individualized education program (IEP) team determines has a high predictability of requiring special education and services. (CA Ed Code, Section 56441.11(d)) (Note: This eligibility category is only applicable for children ages 3-5)
290 Specific learning disability (SLD) Specific Learning Disability means a disorder in one or more of the basic psychological processes involved in understanding or using language, spoken or written, that may manifest itself in an imperfect ability to listen, think, speak, read, write, spell, or to do mathematical calculations, including such conditions as perceptual disabilities, brain injury, minimal brain dysfunction, dyslexia, and developmental aphasia. The term does not include learning problems that are primarily the result of visual, hearing, or motor handicaps, of mental retardation, of emotional disturbance or of environmental, cultural, or economic disadvantage. (34 CFR Sec. 300.8(c)(10)).
300 Deaf-blindness (DB) Deaf-Blindness means concomitant hearing and visual impairments, the combination of which causes such severe communication and other developmental and educational needs that they cannot be accommodated in special education programs solely for children with deafness or children with blindness. (34 CFR Sec. 300.8(c)(2)).
310 Multiple disabilities (MD) Multiple Disabilities means concomitant impairments (such as mental retardation-blindness, mental retardation-orthopedic impairment, etc.,) the combination of which causes such severe educational needs that they cannot be accommodated in special education programs solely for one of the impairments. The term does not include deaf-blind children. (34 CFR Sec. 300.8(c)(7)).
320 Autism (AUT) Autism means a developmental disability significantly affecting verbal and non-verbal communication and social interaction, generally evident before age three, which adversely affects educational performance. Other characteristics often associated with autism include, engagement in repetitive activities and stereotyped movements, resistance to environmental change or change in daily routines, and unusual responses to sensory experiences. The term does not does not apply if a child's educational performance is adversely affected primarily because the child has an emotional disturbance. A child who manifests characteristics of autism after age three, that child could be diagnosed as having autism if the criteria in the above paragraph are satisfied. (34 CFR Sec. 300.8(c)(1)).
330 Traumatic brain injury (TBI) Traumatic Brain Injury means an acquired injury to the brain caused by an external physical force, resulting in total or partial functional disability or psychosocial impairment, which adversely affects educational performance. The term applies to both open or closed head injuries resulting in impairments in one or more areas, such as cognition; language; memory; attention; reasoning; abstract thinking; judgment; problem-solving; sensory, perceptual and motor abilities; psychosocial behavior; physical functions; information processing; and speech. The term does not include brain injuries that are congenital or degenerative, nor brain injuries induced by birth trauma. (34 CFR Sec. 300.8(c)(12)).
Valid Code Value Name Definition
10 School or district personnel Personnel located at a school or district.
20 Court Order An order by a court of law including but not limited to a juvenile court judge.
30 Hearing Officer An appointed impartial official including but not limited to a correctional or judicial officer.
40 Local Governing Board The local school board or equivalent.

NOTE Since Jan 1, 2015, students reprimanded for "willful defiance" in grades K-3 may not be suspended or expelled for that reason alone, nor can students grades 4-12 be expelled (though they can be suspended) for "willful defiance."

Valid Code Value Name Definition
100 Suspension Education Code Section 48925(d) removal of a pupil from ongoing instruction for adjustment purposes. However, suspension does not mean any of the following: (1) Reassignment to another education program or class at the same school where the pupil will receive continuing instruction for the length of day prescribed by the governing board for pupils of the same grade level. (2) Referral to a certificated employee designated by the principal to advise pupils. (3) Removal from the class, but without reassignment to another class or program, for the remainder of the class period without sending the pupil to the principal or the principal's designee as provided in Section 48910. Removal from a particular class shall not occur more than once every five schooldays.
110 In-School Suspension Determined and established by local districts as a supervised in-school suspension classroom for students who are suspended and do not pose an imminent danger or threat or have not been recommended for expulsion as provided in Education Code Section 48911.1.
200 Expulsion Education Code Section 48925(b) removal of a pupil from (1) the immediate supervision and control, or (2) the general supervision, of school personnel, as those terms are used in (Education Code) Section 46300.
300 No Suspension or Expulsion An individual was involved with a specific incident but was disciplined with an action other than suspension or expulsion (including no disciplinary action at all).

NOTE Since Jan 1, 2015, students may not be suspended or expelled in grades K-3 for any reason, or in grades 4-12 for defiance/disruption.

Valid Code Value Name Definition
100 Enforcement Suspended The enforcement of the expulsion order was suspended by the local governing board. Education Code Section 48917(A) or the enforcement of a suspension was suspended by school personnel or local governing board.
200 Shortened The term of expulsion was shortened to be less than one year by the local governing board (as provided by Education Code Section 48916[a]) or the duration of a suspension was shortened by school personnel or local governing board.
300 No Modification There was no modification made to an expulsion or suspension.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
108 Opportunity Program Indicates that the student receives services in an Opportunity Program. An Opportunity Program is a supportive environment with specialized curriculum, instruction, guidance and counseling, psychological services, and tutorial assistance to help students overcome barriers to learning. It should not be viewed as a permanent placement for resistant learners but as a short-term intervention to ensure that students will succeed when they return to their regular classrooms.
113 California Partnership Academy An indication of participation in a California Partnership Academy Program.
122 NCLB Title I Part A Basic Targeted Indicates participation in the No Child Left Behind Title I Part A Targeted Assistance Program.
127 Gifted and Talented Education (GATE) Indicates eligibility for the Gifted and Talented Education Program (GATE).
131 Title X McKinney-Vento Homelesss Program Indicates participation in the No Child Left Behind Title X Homeless Program.
135 Title I Part C Migrant Indicates eligibility for the Title I Part C Migrant Program.
144 Special Education Indicates that the student has been assessed as having a disability per United States Code, Title 20, Section 1401(3)(A), has met the Special Education entitlement criteria in Education Code Section 56026, and has an individualized education program (IEP).
162 Pregnant or Parenting Programs Indicates participation in a program providing services to students who are pregnant or parenting, including but not limited to the California School-Age Families Education Program(Cal-SAFE).
164 NCLB Title I Part D Delinquent Indicates participation in the NCLB Title I Part D Delinquent Program.
171 NCLB Title I Part D Neglected Indicates participation in the NCLB Title I Part D Neglected Program.
172 NCLB Title I Part D At Risk Indicates participation in the No Child Left Behind Title I Part D At Risk Program.
173 NCLB Title I Part D Juvenile Detention Indicates participation in the No Child Left Behind Title I Part D Juvenile Detention Program.
174 NCLB Title I Part A Neglected Indicates participation in the NCLB Title I Part A Neglected Program.
175 Free or Reduced Price Meal Program Indicates that the student has met one or more of the following eligibility criteria for receipt of free or reduced-price meals in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and/or School Breakfast Program (SBP): 1) The student's household meets the United States Department of Agriculture's income eligibility criteria (at or below 185 percent of the applicable family household size and income levels in the federal income poverty guidelines), whether or not they have submitted a program application; 2) the student has applied and met the income eligibility criteria for free or reduced-price meals in the NSLP or SBP; 3) the student is eligible by way of school-wide eligibility as outlined in the 7 Code of Federal Regulations, Section 245.9, Provisions 2 and 3; 4) The student is directly certified based on his/her receipt of benefits in one or more of the following federal programs: a) Food Stamp Program; b) California Work Opportunities and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) Program; c) The Kinship Guardian Assistance Payment (Kin-GAP) Program; or d) Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations (FDPIR). 5) The student is directly certified by an appropriate district liaison to be one of the following: a) Eligible for the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Program; b) eligible for the Runaway and Homeless Youth Grant Program (42 U.S. Code 5701 et seq.); or c) a migratory child as defined in Section 1309 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. This does not necessarily mean that the student is actually receiving meals.
180 CAHSEE Intensive Instruction Indicates participation in the California High School Exit Exam Intensive Instruction Program.
181 Free Meal Program Indicates that the student has met one or more of the following eligibility criteria for receipt of free meals in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and/or School Breakfast Program (SBP):1) The student's household meets the United States Department of Agriculture's income eligibility criteria for free meals (determined by either the submission of an NSLP application or by some other income verification form or process at the local level) ; or2) The student is "directly certified" based on his/her receipt of benefits in one or more of the following federal programs: a) Food Stamp Program; b) California Work Opportunities and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) Program; c) The Kinship Guardian Assistance Payment (Kin-GAP) Program; or d) Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations (FDPIR); or3) The student is "directly certified" by an appropriate district liaison to be one of the following: a) Eligible for the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Program; b) eligible for the Runaway and Homeless Youth Grant Program (42 U.S. Code 5701 et seq.); or c) a migratory child as defined in Section 1309 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965.This does not necessarily mean that the student is actually receiving meals.
182 Reduced-Price Meal Program Indicates that the student has met the following eligibility criteria for receipt of reduced-price meals in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and/or School Breakfast Program (SBP):The student's household meets the United States Department of Agriculture's income eligibility criteria for reduced-price meals (determined by either the submission of an NSLP application or by some other income verification form or process at the local level).This does not necessarily mean that the student is actually receiving meals.
185 Transitional Kindergarten Indicates participation in the Transitional Kindergarten Program.
191 Homeless Program Indicates a student that is eligible for homeless services because they have been identified as homeless.
192 Armed Forces Family MemberNEW! A student is considered to be an Armed Forces Family Member if at least one parent is an Armed Forces member , on active duty or serves on full-time National Guard duty. The terms "armed forces", "active duty" and "full-time National Guard duty"  as defined by sections, 101(a)(4), 101(d)(1) and  101(d)(5) of the United States Code are:

• 101(a) (4)   The term "armed forces" means the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard.

• 101(d) (1)   The term "active duty" means full-time duty in the active military service of the United States. Such term includes full-time training duty, annual training duty, and attendance, while in the active military service, at a school designated as a service school by law or by the Secretary of the military department concerned. Such term does not include full-time National Guard duty.

• 101 (d) (5)   The term "full-time National Guard duty" means training or other duty, other than inactive duty, performed by a member of the Army National Guard of the United States or the Air National Guard of the United States in the member's status as a member of the National Guard of a State or territory, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, or the District of Columbia under section 316, 502, 503, 504, or 505 of title 32for which the member is entitled to pay from the United States or for which the member has waived pay from the United States
154 Career Technical Education The course content is related to an approved Career Technical Education (CTE) Pathway (as per the California Career Technical Education Model Curriculum Standards) and is taught by a teacher who is appropriately authorized through the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing to teach in a specific CTE industry sector.
113 California Partnership Academy Funding is or was provided by the California Partnership Academy Program.
168 Specialized Secondary Programs Funding is or was provided by the Specialized Secondary Program (SSP).
Valid Code Value Name Definition
154 Career Technical Education The course content is related to Career Technical Education.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
113 California Partnership Academy Funding is or was provided by the California Partnership Academy Program.
168 Specialized Secondary Programs Funding is or was provided by the Specialized Secondary Program (SSP).
Valid Code Value Name Definition
1 CAHSEE Math Waiver (Education Code 60851(c)(1)) Waives the requirement to successfully pass the (mathematics portion of the) exit examination as a condition of receiving a diploma of graduation or a condition of graduation from high school special education students.
2 CAHSEE ELA Waiver (Education Code 60851(c)(1)) Waives the requirement to successfully pass the (English language arts portion of the) exit examination as a condition of receiving a diploma of graduation or a condition of graduation from high school special education students.
3 CAHSEE Exemption (Education Code 60852.3(a)) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, commencing with the 2009-10 school year, an eligible pupil with a disability is not required to pass the high school exit examination established pursuant to Section 60850 as a condition of receiving a diploma of graduation or as a condition of graduation from high school.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
1 Granted The request for a waiver was approved by the proper authority.
2 Denied The request for a waiver was denied by the proper authority.
3 Withdrawn The request for a waiver was withdrawn by the original requestor.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
1 Primary Language Instruction and ELD Instruction and/or SDAIE Instruction This course section is providing primary language instruction, English Language Development (ELD), and Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English.Primary language instruction is an approach used to teach academic courses in and/or through a primary language other than English. The curriculum must be equivalent to that provided to fluent English proficient (FEP) and English only students. Instruction must be provided by an authorized teacher (either certified or in training for the type of service provided). ELD is an academic subject of English language instruction appropriate for the student's identified level of language proficiency. ELD is consistently implemented and designed to promote second language acquisition of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. ELD instruction must be provided by an authorized teacher (either certified or in training for the type of service provided). SDAIE is an approach used to teach academic courses to English learner (EL) students in English. SDAIE must be designed for non-native speakers of English and focused on increasing the comprehensibility of the academic courses normally provided to FEP and English-only students in the district. SDAIE must be provided by an authorized teacher (either certified or in training for the type of service provided).
2 ELD Instruction Only This course section is providing only English Language Development (ELD) instruction, which is an academic subject of English language instruction appropriate for the student's identified level of language proficiency. ELD is consistently implemented and designed to promote second language acquisition of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. ELD instruction must be provided by an authorized teacher (either certified or in training for the type of service provided).
3 SDAIE Instruction Only This course section is providing only Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE) services, which is an approach used to teach academic courses to English learner (EL) students in English. SDAIE must be designed for non-native speakers of English and focused on increasing the comprehensibility of the academic courses normally provided to FEP and English-only students in the district. SDAIE must be provided by an authorized teacher (either certified or in training for the type of service provided).
4 ELD Instruction and SDAIE Instruction But Not Primary Language Instruction The course section is providing English Language Development (ELD) instruction and Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE) but NOT Primary Language Instruction. ELD is an academic subject of English language instruction appropriate for the student's identified level of language proficiency. ELD is consistently implemented and designed to promote second language acquisition of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. ELD instruction must be provided by an authorized teacher (either certified or in training for the type of service provided). SDAIE is an approach used to teach academic courses to English learner (EL) students in English. SDAIE must be designed for non-native speakers of English and focused on increasing the comprehensibility of the academic courses normally provided to FEP and English-only students in the district. SDAIE must be provided by an authorized teacher (either certified or in training for the type of service provided). The course section is NOT providing Primary Language Instruction.
5 No English Learner Services The course is not providing any instructional services designed specifically for English learners.
6 Other English Learner Service The course section is providing some type of instructional service, that, while specifically designed for ELs, is an instructional service that is not narrowly defined in the other English learner services (Primary Language Instruction, English language development, or Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English).  These instructional services vary either quantitatively or qualitatively from the other EL services. For example, use this code for courses providing ONLY services such as dictionaries or glossaries in the primary language to support learning; or for courses providing alternative EL services to severely disabled students in a special education setting.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
05 T1-Instruction Mathematics A targeted instructional service in mathematics received under Title I Part A Basic.
06 T1-Reading Language Arts A targeted instructional service in reading/language arts received under Title I Part A Basic.
07 T1-Science A targeted instructional service in science received under Title I Part A Basic.
08 T1-Social Studies A targeted instructional service in social studies received under Title I Part A Basic.
09 T1-Vocational/Career A targeted vocational/career instructional service received under Title I Part A Basic.
10 T1-Other Instructional Service Another type of targeted instructional service received under Title I Part A Basic.
11 T1-Health Dental and Eye Care A targeted health, dental, or eye care support service received under Title I Part A Basic.
12 T1-Guidance/Advocacy A targeted guidance/advocacy support service received under Title I Part A Basic.
13 T1-Other Support Service Another support service received under Title I Part A Basic.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
10 Administrator An employee of the Education Service Institution in a position requiring certification but who is not required to provide direct instruction to pupils or direct services to pupils (services such as those provided by a pupil services employee. This category does not include mentor teachers.
11 Pupil services An employee of an Educational Service Institution who is in a position requiring a standard designated services credential or a health and development credential and who performs direct services to pupils (counselors, guidance and welfare personnel, psychologists, etc.). Program specialists as defined in Education Code Section 56368 are also to be reported as pupil service employees.
12 Teacher An employee of the Educational Service Institution who holds a position requiring certification or other state alternative and whose duties require direct instruction to the pupils in the school(s) of that district, including mentor teachers and in some cases, long-term substitute teachers.
24 Other K-12 Classified staff An employee of an Educational Service Institution who is Non-certificated, such as clerical staff, custodians, food service staff, bus drivers, noon-duty supervisors, etc. Does not include non-certificated administrators. These elements would likely be collected in an aggregate or summary form.
25 Non-certificated Administrator An employee of an Educational Service Institution at the administrative level (assistant, deputy or associate superintendent, or higher) who has been waived of the requirement of having to possess an administrative services credential.
26 Charter School Non-certificated Teacher An employee of a charter school that is providing instruction in a non-core course (as defined in the school's charter) who has been waived of the requirement of having to obtain a teaching credential.
27 Itinerant or Pull-Out/Push-In Teacher An itinerant staff member assigned to more than one school site and/or a teacher who provides one-on-one or small group support or resource instruction by either pulling students out of the classroom, or coming into the classroom to provide the instruction.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
1 Tenured The teacher is granted the right not to be fired without cause after an initial probationary period.
2 Probationary The teacher is in a trial period of his or her employment to determine whether or not he or she is suitable for the position.
3 Temporary The teacher is hired with the intention that he or she will employed for a finite period of time.
4 Other Any other type of employment status for a teacher, such as teachers who are not official employees of a district and are contracted employees from another agency or district.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
EL English Learner A student in kindergarten through grade 12 for whom there is a report of a language other than English on the Home Language Survey and who, upon initial assessment in California using an appropriate state assessment (currently the California English Language Development Test (CELDT)) and from additional information when appropriate, is determined to lack the clearly defined English language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and/or writing necessary to succeed in the school's regular instructional programs.
EO English or American Sign Language Only A student in kindergarten through grade 12 for whom the only language reported on the Home Language Survey (HLS) is English or American Sign Language.
IFEP Initial Fluent English Proficient A student in kindergarten through grade 12 for whom a language other than English is reported on the Home Language Survey and who, upon initial assessment in California using an appropriate state assessment (currently the California English Language Development Test (CELDT)) and from additional information when appropriate, is determined to be proficient in English.
RFEP Reclassified Fluent English Proficient A student in kindergarten through grade 12 who, upon entering public school in California, is identified as an English learner (EL) and subsequently reclassified/redesignated in California, per Education Code 313, as proficient in English. Education Code 313 criteria include, but are not limited to, an assessment of English proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as currently measured by the California English Language Development Test (CELDT), teacher evaluation of curriculum mastery, parental opinion/consultation, and student's performance of basic skills, as measured by the California Standards Test English Language Arts, that demonstrates sufficient proficiency in English to participate effectively in a curriculum designed for students of the same age whose native language is English.
TBD To Be Determined A student in kindergarten through grade 12 for whom there is a report of a primary language other than English on the Home Language Survey and for whom the district has not completed the assessment process. The assessment process must be completed within 30 days of initial enrollment.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
N No A student who was reclassified as fluent English proficient (R-FEP) has not scored at the proficient or advanced level on the California Standards Test in English Language Arts for three years (not necessarily consecutive).
U Unknown The response cannot be determined.
Y Yes A student who was reclassified as fluent English proficient (R-FEP) has scored at the proficient or advanced level on the California Standards Test in English Language Arts for three years (not necessarily consecutive).
Valid Code Value Name Definition
10 Primary enrollment The student's name appears on a register, roll, or list, the student is currently attending (or intends to attend) the educational service institution (ESI), or is responsible for the students instruction (students attending NPS schools).
20 Secondary enrollment The student's name appears on a register, roll, or list and the student is currently attending the educational service institution concurrently with their PRIMARY educational service institution
30 Short term enrollment The student's name appears on a register, roll, or list, the student is currently attending the educational service institution, and receives or will receive the majority of their instruction at the institution for less than 30 days. (Use allowed only by specific ESIs)
40 Receiving specialized services only The student's name appears on a register, roll, or list solely for the purposes of receiving some sort of specialized instruction, e.g., CAHSEE Intensive Instruction. (Use for non-ADA students only).
50 Summer or Intersession The student's name appears on a register, roll, or list for a summer or intersession term but is not primarily enrolled within the reporting local educational agency.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
F Female Female
M Male Male
Valid Code Value Name Definition
01 First Grade Grade One
02 Second Grade Grade Two
03 Third Grade Grade Three
04 Fourth Grade Grade Four
05 Fifth Grade Grade Five
06 Sixth Grade Grade Six
07 Seventh Grade Grade Seven
08 Eighth Grade Grade Eight
09 Ninth Grade Grade Nine
10 Tenth Grade Grade Ten
11 Eleventh Grade Grade Eleven
12 Twelfth Grade Grade Twelve
AD Adult A category for students who are primarily enrolled in an adult education center. These students would not have an affiliation with a K-12 institution.
IN Infant A grade level for individuals, ages 0 through 18 months.
KN Kindergarten Kindergarten
PS Prekindergarten A grade level for individuals, ages 36 months to 5 years old, who are formally enrolled in a preschool program in preparation for entrance to kindergarten.
TD Toddlers A grade level for individuals, ages 19 months through 35 months, not yet enrolled in a public educational institution or formal preschool program.
UE Ungraded Elementary A grade level for students enrolled in elementary classes (kindergarten through eighth grades) that are not assigned to a specific grade level. This grade level is specifically for students in a special education program.
US Ungraded Secondary A grade level for students enrolled in secondary classes (ninth through twelfth grades) that are not assigned to a specific grade level. This grade level is specifically for students in a special education program.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
TBN Negative - Tubercolosis The presence of the antibody for tuberculosis has not been detected.
TBP Positive - Tuberculosis The presence of the antibody for tuberculosis has been detected.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
10 Graduate Degree or Higher An individual received a Master's or Doctorate Degree.
11 College Graduate An individual attended a postsecondary education institution and graduated with a Bachelor's Degree.
12 Some College or Associate's Degree An individual attended or is attending a postsecondary education institution but did not or has not yet graduated with a Bachelor's Degree. This includes a student who received an Associate's Degree.
13 High School Graduate An individual graduated from high school, met all state and local graduation requirements, and received a standard high school diploma.
14 Not a High School Graduate An individual did not meet all state and local graduation requirements and did not receive a standard high school diploma.
15 Decline to State An individual declined to state his or her highest educational level. This is not the same as unknown (missing information).
Valid Code Value Name Definition
100 Temporary Shelters A temporary residence provided for homeless individuals who would otherwise sleep on the street or a temporary residence provided to individuals in emergency situations. This is also applicable to children who are in temporary residences awaiting permanent placement in foster care.
110 Hotels/motels A temporary residence for homeless individuals usually requiring payment or vouchers for lodging and services on a daily, weekly, or monthly basis.
120 Temporarily Doubled Up A temporary residence where a homeless family is sharing the housing of other persons due to the loss of housing, economic hardship, or other similar reasons.
130 Temporarily Unsheltered A type of residence for homeless individuals that is not meant for human habitation, such as cars, parks, sidewalks, abandoned buildings, campgrounds, trailer parks, bus and train stations, or persons abandoned in the hospital (on the street). A rule of thumb would be to see the dwelling as comparable to an automobile in that it shelters but is not adequate housing.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
10 County Record A document maintained by a county operated by a county health facility providing proof of immunization.
20 Health Clinic Records A document maintained by a private health clinic providing proof of immunization.
30 State School Immunization Records A document maintained by a state operated school providing proof of immunization, commonly known as the blue card.
40 Migrant Student Records A document or record maintained by the Migrant Education Program providing proof of immunization.
50 Physician's Report A document provided by a licensed physician providing proof of immunization.
60 Out-of-state School Record A document provided by an out-of-state school providing proof of immunization.
70 Foreign Immunization Record A document provided by a foreign agency providing proof of immunization.
80 Other Source Any other source of documentation used to provide proof of immunization.
90 Yellow California Immunization Record A document issued by the State of California that is used to document an individual's immunizations. This record is maintained separately from the blue California School Immunization Record.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
M Medical The individual has a medical exemption for a specific immunization.
O Occurrence The individual has a written statement from his or her physician, and in some cases laboratory confirmation, indicating that the individual has had a previous occurrence of a specific disease and is therefore exempted from a specific immunization.
P Personal The individual has personal reasons for requesting an exemption from a specific immunization.
R Religious The individual has religious beliefs that prohibit a specific immunization.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
100 Polio Oral Poliovirus Vaccine (OPV) or Inactive Poliovirus Vaccine (IPV)
110 DTP/DtaP/DT/Td Diptheria, Tetanus, and Pertussis.
120 MMR Measles, Mumps, and Rubella
130 HIB Meningitis Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis
140 Hep A Hepatitis A Virus
150 HBV Hepatitis B Virus
160 Varicella (Chicken pox) Varicella/Chicken Pox virus
170 TB Tuberculosis
180 RSV Respiratory Syncytial Virus.
190 PCV Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine
200 PPV Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine
210 INF Influenza
220 Tuberculosis Screening - PPD-Mantoux A type of skin test used to detect the presence of tuberculosis in an individual using a purified protein derivative (PPD).
230 Tuberculosis Screening - Other Any other type of skin test used to detect the presence of tuberculosis in an individual.
300 Other Any other vaccine or health screening not listed.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
300 Home and Hospital Instruction provided to an individual pupil in the pupil's home, in a hospital or other residential health facility, excluding state hospitals, or under other circumstances prescribed by regulations adopted for that purpose by the State Board of Education (Education Code Section 48206.3(1)).
400 Alternative EL Program - Two-Way Immersion (Various Models) An instructional strategy where English learners (ELs) with an approved Parental Exception Waiver are placed in a Two-Way Immersion setting designed for ELs and native English speakers, with core content instruction delivered in the ELs' primary language and English. ELs receive instruction in English language development (ELD) and all students are provided grade-level core content instruction based on state standards.
500 Structured English Immersion and/or English Learner Mainstreaming An instructional strategy where English learners (ELs) who score at less than reasonable fluency in English are placed in an Structured English Immersion (SEI) program setting, which is taught overwhelmingly in English with curriculum and presentation designed for students who are learning the English language. Students receive instruction in English language development (ELD) and other grade-level core content based on state standards. Some instruction and/or support may be provided in the students' primary language. This may also include English Learner Mainstreaming, an instructional strategy where English learners (ELs) who score at reasonable fluency in English are placed in an English Language Mainstream (ELM) program setting, which is taught in English with curriculum and presentation designed for students who are learning the English language. Students receive instruction in English language development (ELD) and other grade-level core content based on state standards. Some assistance may be provided in the primary language.
600 Alternative EL Program - Bilingual (Various Models) An instructional strategy where English learners (ELs) with an approved Parental Exception Waiver are placed in a bilingual program setting with at least some core content instruction in their primary language. The portion of the instructional day delivered in each language varies by the type of program and its goals. Students receive instruction in English language development (ELD) and other grade-level core content instruction based on state standards. This program is specifically designed to address the learning and language acquisition needs of ELs.
650 English Learner Mainstreaming An instructional strategy where English learners (ELs) who score at reasonable fluency in English are placed in an English Language Mainstream (ELM) program setting, which is taught in English with curriculum and presentation designed for students who are learning the English language. Students receive instruction in English language development (ELD) and other grade-level core content based on state standards. Some assistance may be provided in the primary language.
700 Special Education An instructional strategy using the individually planned and systematically monitored arrangement of physical settings, special equipment and materials, teaching procedures, and other interventions designed to help learners with special needs achieve the greatest possible personal self-sufficiency and success in school and community.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
00 English English
01 Spanish Spanish
02 Vietnamese Vietnamese
03 Cantonese Cantonese
04 Korean Korean
05 Filipino (Pilipino or Tagalog) Pilipino (Tagalog)
06 Portuguese Portuguese
07 Mandarin (Putonghua) Mandarin (Putonghua)
08 Japanese Japanese
09 Khmer (Cambodian) Khmer (Cambodian)
10 Lao Lao
11 Arabic Arabic
12 Armenian Armenian
13 Burmese Burmese
14 Croatian Croatian
15 Dutch Dutch
16 Farsi (Persian) Farsi (Persian)
17 French French
18 German German
19 Greek Greek
20 Chamorro (Guamanian) Chamorro (Guamanian)
21 Hebrew Hebrew
22 Hindi Hindi
23 Hmong Hmong
24 Hungarian Hungarian
25 Ilocano Ilocano
26 Indonesian Indonesian
27 Italian Italian
28 Punjabi Punjabi
29 Russian Russian
30 Samoan Samoan
31 Serbian Serbian
32 Thai Thai
33 Turkish Turkish
34 Tongan Tongan
35 Urdu Urdu
36 Cebuano (Visayan) Cebuano (Visayan)
37 Sign Language Sign Language
38 Ukrainian Ukrainian
39 Chaozhou (Chiuchow) Chaozhou (Chiuchow)
40 Pashto Pashto
41 Polish Polish
42 Assyrian Assyrian
43 Gujarati Gujarati
44 Mien (Yao) Mien (Yao)
45 Rumanian Rumanian
46 Taiwanese Taiwanese
47 Lahu Lahu
48 Marshallese Marshallese
49 Mixteco Mixteco
50 Khmu Khmu
51 Kurdish (Kurdi, Kurmanji) Kurdish (Kurdi, Kurmanji)
52 Serbo-Croatian (Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian) Serbo-Croatian (Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian)
53 Toishanese Toishanese
54 Chaldean Chaldean
56 Albanian Albanian
57 Tigrinya Tigrinya
58 Bosnian Bosnian
60 Somali Somali
61 Bengali Bengali
62 Telugu Telugu
63 Tamil Tamil
64 Marathi Marathi
65 Kannada Kannada
66 Amharic Amharic
67 Bulgarian  Bulgarian 
68 Kikuyu (Gikuyu) Kikuyu (Gikuyu)
69 Kashmiri Kashmiri
70 Swedish  Swedish 
71 Zapoteco  Zapoteco 
72 Uzbek Uzbek
99 Other non-English languages Other non-English languages
UU Unknown Unknown
Valid Code Value Name Definition
1 Eligible An individual has met the criteria for participation in an Education Program.
3 Participating An individual is eligible, enrolled, and is receiving services through an Education Program.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
1 Team teaching Two or more teachers providing instruction to the class during the entire class session.
2 Job sharing Two or more teachers providing instruction to the class on an alternating basis, and not at the same time.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
JR Junior A child who has the same first, middle, and last names as their parent.
SR Senior The eldest of two or more persons in a family with the same first, middle, and last names.
I The First A suffix to an individual's name indicating they are the first person in their family to be given a specific name, if there is more than one person in a family with that name.
II The Second A suffix to an individual's name indicating they are the second person in their family to be given a specific name, if there is more than one person in a family with that name.
III The Third A suffix to an individual's name indicating they are the third person in their family to be given a specific name, if there is more than one person in a family with that name.
IV The Fourth A suffix to an individual's name indicating they are the fourth person in their family to be given a specific name, if there is more than one person in a family with that name.
V The Fifth A suffix to an individual's name indicating they are the fifth person in their family to be given a specific name, if there is more than one person in a family with that name.
VI The Sixth A suffix to an individual's name indicating they are the sixth person in their family to be given a specific name, if there is more than one person in a family with that name.
VII The Seventh A suffix to an individual's name indicating they are the eighth person in their family to be given a specific name, if there is more than one person in a family with that name.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
0100 Superintendent Superintendent
0102 Deputy or associate superintendent (general) Deputy or associate superintendent (general)
0103 Administrative assistant (general) Administrative assistant (general)
0104 Admin finance/business Admin finance/business
0105 Admin instructional/curriculum services Admin instructional/curriculum services
0106 Admin public relations/information Admin public relations/information
0107 Admin staff personnel services Admin staff personnel services
0108 Admin pupil personnel services An administrator that works with an individual or groups of students or families to provide the services authorized by their credential to address the needs of all students by providing a comprehensive pupil personnel services program.
0109 Admin program evaluation/research Admin program evaluation/research
0110 Admin staff development Admin staff development
0111 Admin food services Admin food services
0112 Admin data processing Admin data processing
0113 Admin transportation Admin transportation
0114 Admin welfare and attendance An administrator that accesses appropriate services from both public and private providers, including law enforcement and social services; provides staff development to school personnel regarding state and federal laws pertaining to due process and child welfare and attendance laws; addresses school policies and procedures that inhibit academic success; implements strategies to improve student attendance; participates in school-wide reform efforts; and promotes understanding and appreciation of those factors that affect the attendance of culturally-diverse student populations.
0115 Admin health/medical svcs (not school nurse) Admin health/medical svcs (not school nurse)
0116 Admin other central office service Admin other central office service
0117 Asst administrator/consultant Asst administrator/consultant
0118 Admin school improvement Admin school improvement
0119 Admin bilingual education Admin bilingual education
0120 Admin Career Technical Education Admin Career Technical Education
0121 Admin homemaking education Admin homemaking education
0122 Admin compensatory education Admin compensatory education
0124 Admin special education Admin special education
0125 Admin federal/state-funded programs (general) Admin federal/state-funded programs (general)
0126 Admin other program Admin other program
0128 Admin elementary Admin elementary
0129 Admin reading/language arts Admin reading/language arts
0130 Admin foreign languages Admin foreign languages
0131 Admin mathematics Admin mathematics
0132 Admin science Admin science
0133 Admin social sciences Admin social sciences
0134 Admin art/music Admin art/music
0135 Admin health Admin health
0136 Admin athletics Admin athletics
0137 Admin other subject area Admin other subject area
0138 Asst admin/consultant program/subject area Asst admin/consultant program/subject area
0139 Admin library/media services Admin library/media services
0140 Admin media services Admin media services
0141 Admin driver training Admin driver training
0142 Admin environmental education Admin environmental education
0143 Admin instructional television Admin instructional television
0145 Admin year-round schools Admin year-round schools
0146 Admin summer schools Admin summer schools
0147 Admin alternative education Admin alternative education
0148 Admin independent study Admin independent study
0149 Admin physical education Admin physical education
0150 Admin proficiency/competency Admin proficiency/competency
0151 Admin region/area Admin region/area
0152 Admin integration/desegregation Admin integration/desegregation
0153 Admin government relations/legal services Admin government relations/legal services
0154 Admin work experience education Admin work experience education
0155 Admin secondary Admin secondary
0156 Admin union representative Admin union representative
0157 Admin gifted and talented Admin gifted and talented
0158 Admin technology coordinator Admin technology coordinator
0159 Admin activities director Admin activities director
0160 Charter School Administrator or Director A charter school administrator or director is an individual who is responsible for the day-to-day operations of a charter school, as specified in the school's charter.
0171 Community day Community day
0199 Admin advanced placement Admin advanced placement
0202 Psychologist A school psychologist provides services that enhance academic performance; designs strategies and programs to address problems of adjustment; consults with other educators and parents on issues of social development, behavioral and academic difficulties; conducts psycho-educational assessments for purposes of identifying special needs; provides psychological counseling for individuals, groups and families; and coordinates intervention strategies for management of individual and school-wide crises.
0203 Psychometrist A psychometrist administers psychological examinations to students but is not authorized to read and interpret the examinations. A school psychologist authorization allows the holder to administer the examinations and read and interpret them.
0204 Teacher Librarian A teacher librarian can do the following:1) instruct pupils in the choice and use of library materials;2) plan and coordinate school library programs with the instructional programs of a school district;3) select materials for school and district libraries;4) coordinate or supervise library programs at the school site, district or county level;5) plan and conduct a course of instruction for those pupils who assist in the operation of school libraries;6) supervise classified personnel assigned school library duties; and7) develop procedures for and management of the school site and district libraries.
0205 Social worker A school social worker assesses home, school, personal and community factors that may affect a student's learning; identifies and provides intervention strategies for children and their families including counseling, case management, and crisis intervention; consults with teachers, administrators and other school staff regarding social and emotional needs of students; and coordinates family, school and community resources on behalf of students.
0206 Nurse A school nurse can perform the following:1) conduct immunization programs;2) assess and evaluate the health and development status of pupils;3) interpret the health and development assessment to parents, teachers, administrators and other professionals directly concerned with the pupil;4) design and implement individual student health maintenance plans;5) maintain communication with parents and all involved community practitioners and agencies;6) interpret medical and nursing findings appropriate to the student's individualized education program and make recommendations to professional personnel directly involved;7) consult, conduct, and serve as a resource person for in-service training to teachersand administrators;8) develop and implement health education curriculum; act as a participant in implementing a comprehensive health instruction curriculum for students;9) counsel and assist pupils and parents in health related and school adjustment services; and10) teach health-related subjects under the supervision of a classroom teacher.
0208 Special education resource specialist Special education resource specialist
0209 Other medical professional Other medical professional
0211 DIS, Speech-Language Pathologists A credentialed or licensed Speech-Language Pathologists who provides services to children with disabilities from preschool through age 22 for identification of children with speech or language impairments; diagnosis and appraisal of specific speech or language impairments; referral for medical or other professional attention necessary for the habilitation of speech or language impairments; provision of speech and language services for the habilitation or prevention of communicative impairments; and counseling and guidance of parents, children, and teachers regarding speech and language impairments.
0212 Special ed audiology Special ed audiology
0213 Special ed physical therapy Special ed physical therapy
0214 Special ed vision therapy Special ed vision therapy
0215 Counselors and Rehabilitation Counselors A credentialed or licensed individual who provides counseling services pursuant to an IEP. Counselors are professionals who guide individuals, families, groups, and communities by assisting them in problem solving, decision making, discovering meaning, and articulating goals related to personal, educational and career development. Counseling is expected to supplement the regular guidance and counseling program. (CCR Title 5 º 3051.9). This shall include counseling services pursuant to an IEP provided by a counselor, psychologist, social worker, and others. Include rehabilitation counselors who provide services in individual or group sessions that focus specifically on career development, employment preparation, achieving independence, and integration in the workplace and community of a student with a disability. The term also includes vocational rehabilitation services provided to a student with disabilities by vocational rehabilitation programs funded under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.
0216 Special ed psychologist Special ed psychologist
0217 Special ed parent counseling/training Special ed parent counseling/training
0218 DIS, Medical/Nursing Services A qualified individual who provides services to students with disabilities preschool to age 22 pursuant to an IEP when a student has health problems which require nursing intervention beyond basic school health services.Include medical services provided by a licensed physician for diagnostic and evaluation purposes provided to determine whether a child has a disability and the nature and extent of the special education and related services that the child needs. Also include personnel who provide nursing services designed to enable a child with a disability to receive FAPE as described in the child's IEP, with the exception of services related to medical devices that are surgically implanted (e.g., cochlear implants).
0219 Special ed social worker Special ed social worker
0220 Physical Education, Recreation, and Therapeutic Recreation A credentialed Adapted Physical Education Specialist who provides services to children with disabilities from preschool through age 22 for special physical education, adaptive physical education, movement education, or motor development to children and youth with disabilities. Include qualified recreation and therapeutic recreation specialists who provide:(i) Assessment of leisure function;(ii) Therapeutic recreation services;(iii) Recreation programs in schools and community agencies; and(iv) Leisure education.
0221 Special ed diagnostic staff Special ed diagnostic staff
0222 Special ed work study coordinator Special ed work study coordinator
0223 Special ed occupational therapist Special ed occupational therapist
0224 Special ed program specialist Special ed program specialist
0225 Special ed mobility instruction Special ed mobility instruction
0226 DIS, Interpreter A certified, licensed or registered individual who provides educational interpreting services pursuant to an IEP for preschool students through age 22, to children who are deaf or hard of hearing, including oral transliteration services, cued language transliteration services, and sign language interpreting services. 5 CCR 3051.16-65
0228 Special ed other noninstructional staff Special ed other noninstructional staff
0301 Principal Principal
0302 Vice principal or assoc/asst administrator Vice principal or assoc/asst administrator
0307 Admin other school-level services Admin other school-level services
0318 Admin continuation education Admin continuation education
0400 Counselor A counselor develops, plans, implements and evaluates a school counseling and guidance program that includes academic, career, personal and social development; advocate for the higher academic achievement and social development of all students; provide school-wide prevention and intervention strategies and counseling services; provide consultation, training and staff development to teachers and parents regarding students' needs; and supervise a district-approved advisory program as described in Education Code Section 49600.
0407 Other student support services Other student support services
0501 Non-certificated superintendent/deputy supt Non-certificated superintendent/deputy supt
6006 Distance Learning classroom monitor Distance Learning classroom monitor
6007 Alternative/opportunity education teacher Alternative/opportunity education teacher
6010 Mentor teacher Mentor teacher
6011 Peer assistance review Peer assistance review
6014 Day to Day substitute teacher - permanent  emp. Day to Day substitute teacher - permanent emp.
6017 Resource teacher (not instructing students) Resource teacher (not instructing students). Do not use this if the teacher is providing instruction to students. Submit a Course Section record with a Course Group State Code of 3020 (Consultation/Instructional Support).
6018 Employee on Leave An employee is still employed with an LEA but has taken a temporary leave of absence from all of their staff assignments.
6019 Beginning teacher support and assessment (BTSA) Beginning teacher support and assessment (BTSA)
6020 Other Certificated non-instructional assignment Other Certificated non-instructional assignment
6027 Non-Instructional Teacher Librarian Teachers in this assignment hold a Teacher Librarian Services Credential and may perform the following duties: plan and coordinate school library programs with the instructional programs of a school district through collaboration with teachers; select materials for school and district libraries; develop programs for and deliver staff development for school library services; coordinate or supervise library programs at the school, district or county level; supervise classified personnel assigned school library duties; and develop procedures for and management of the school and district libraries. These teachers do not provide instruction to students in either classroom-based or pull-out or push-in settings.
6099 Department chair Department chair
Valid Code Value Name Definition
A Alcohol Related Alcohol-related incidents are those in which the reason for at least one-day removal from the classroom is one of the following: ò Alcohol possession or use on school grounds.ò Being under the influence of alcohol on school grounds.
D Illicit Drug Related Drug-related incidents are those in which the reason for at least one-day removal from the classroom is an event involving possession or use of substances that include tobacco or illicit drugs (including steroids, all prescription drugs for which the student does not have a prescription and inappropriate use of nonprescription drugs and other substances). Drug-related incidents will include the following:
● Possession or use of marijuana, hashish, or other cannabinoids on school grounds.
● Other illicit drugs possession or use on school grounds.
● Being under the influence of marijuana or illicit drugs on school grounds.
● Tobacco possession or use on school grounds.
● Inappropriate use of medication on school grounds.
● Trafficking or possession for sale of marijuana or other illicit drugs on school grounds.
OTHER Other reasons for out of school suspensions related to drug use and violence Other reasons for out of school suspensions related to drug use and violence.
VIOWINJ Violent Incident (with Physical Injury) Violent incidents may include, but are not limited to, the following:● Battery (physical attack or harm): Examples include striking that causes bleeding, broken nose, and kicking a student while he or she is down. Consider age and developmentally appropriate behavior before using this category. This category should be used when the attack is serious enough to warrant calling the police or security or when serious bodily harm occurs. Include an attack with a weapon in this category. (This offense may be referred to by law enforcement as aggravated assault.)● Fighting (mutual altercation): Mutual participation in an incident involving physical violence where there is no major injury.● Harassment, nonsexual (physical, verbal, or psychological): Repeatedly annoying or attacking a student or group of students or other personnel that creates an intimidating or hostile educational or work environment.● Harassment, sexual (unwelcome sexual conduct): Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, other physical or verbal conduct, or communication of a sexual nature, including gender-based harassment that creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive educational or work environment.● Homicide (murder or manslaughter): Killing a human being.●  Physical altercation, minor (pushing, shoving): Confrontation, tussle, or physical aggression that does not result in injury.● Robbery (taking of things by force): The taking of, or attempting to take, anything of value that is owned by another person or organization under confrontational circumstances by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the victim in fear. A key difference between robbery and theft is that the threat of physical harm or actual physical harm is involved in a robbery.● School threat (threat of destruction or harm): Any threat (verbal, written, or electronic) by a person to bomb or use other substances or devices for the purpose of exploding, burning, or causing damage to a school building or school property, or to harm students or staff.● Sexual battery (sexual assault): Oral, anal, or vaginal penetration forcibly or against the person's will or where the victim is incapable of giving consent. Includes rape, fondling, indecent liberties, child molestation, and sodomy.●  Threat/intimidation (causing fear of harm): Physical, verbal, written, or electronic action which immediately creates fear of harm, without displaying a weapon and without subjecting the victim to actual physical attack. (This category only includes verbal incidents that cause fear. It does not include insubordination, lack of respect, defiance of authority, etc.).
VIOWOINJ Violent Incident (without Physical Injury) Incidents with injury include those in which one or more students, school personnel, or other persons on school grounds require professional medical attention. Examples include stab or bullet wounds, concussions, fractured or broken bones, or cuts requiring stitches.
W Weapons Possession Possession of one of the following items:
● Handgun.
● Shotgun or rifle.
● Other type of firearm (e.g., devices designed to expel a projectile, grenade, explosive).
● Knife.
● Other sharp object (e.g., razor blade, ice pick, Chinese star).
● Other object (chain, brass knuckle, billy club, stun gun).
● Substance used as a weapon (mace, tear gas).
Valid Code Value Name Definition
100 Temporary Shelters A temporary residence provided for homeless individuals who would otherwise sleep on the street or a temporary residence provided to individuals in emergency situations. This is also applicable to children who are in temporary residences awaiting permanent placement in foster care.
110 Hotels/motels A temporary residence for homeless individuals usually requiring payment or vouchers for lodging and services on a daily, weekly, or monthly basis.
120 Temporarily Doubled Up A temporary residence where a homeless family is sharing the housing of other persons due to the loss of housing, economic hardship, or other similar reasons.
130 Temporarily Unsheltered A type of residence for homeless individuals that is not meant for human habitation, such as cars, parks, sidewalks, abandoned buildings, campgrounds, trailer parks, bus and train stations, or persons abandoned in the hospital (on the street). A rule of thumb would be to see the dwelling as comparable to an automobile in that it shelters but is not adequate housing.
200 Permanent Housing A type of fixed and regular residence that is owned, rented, or sublet.
210 Foster Family Home or Kinship Placement A family residence that is licensed by the state, or other public agency having delegated authority by contract with the state to license, to provide 24-hour non-medical care and supervision for not more than six foster children, including, but not limited to, individuals with exceptional needs. This also includes Small Family Homes as described in Health and Safety Code Section 1502(c)(6) (Education Code Section 56155.5[b]), or an Approved Home of a relative. An Approved Home means the home of a relative or nonrelative extended family member that is exempt from licensure and is approved as meeting the same standards as those set forth in CCR Title 22, Div. 6, Article 3. This is not the same as a Licensed Children's Home.
220 Licensed Children's Institution A residential facility that is licensed by the state, or other public agency having delegated authority by contract with the state to license, to provide non-medical care to children, including, but not limited to, individuals with exceptional needs. Licensed children's institution includes a group home as defined by subdivision (g) of Section 80001 of Title 22 of the California Code of Regulations. As used in this article and Article 3 (commencing with Section 56836.16) of Chapter 7.2, a licensed children's institution does not include any of the following: (1) A juvenile court school, juvenile hall, juvenile home, day center, juvenile ranch, or juvenile camp administered pursuant to Article 2.5 (commencing with Section 48645) of Chapter 4 of Part 27. (2) A county community school program provided pursuant to Section 1981. (3) Any special education programs provided pursuant to Section 56150. (4) Any other public agency.
230 Residential School/ Dormitory A nonsectarian school where a student with exceptional needs resides on a 24-hour basis and receives special education and related services at the school. This includes both public and private facilities. This is not the same as an Incarceration Institution or a Licensed Children's Institution.
240 Health Institution A public hospital, state licensed children's hospital, psychiatric hospital, proprietary hospital, or a health facility for medical purposes. (E.C. 56167(a)). It does not include state hospitals operated by the California Department of Developmental Services.
250 Incarceration Institution Individuals who have been adjudicated by the juvenile court, for placement in a juvenile hall or juvenile home, day center, ranch, or camp, or for individuals placed in a county community school (E.C. 56150); includes placement in the Department of Corrections - Division of Juvenile Justice (formerly California Education Authority or California Youth Authority), and other public correctional institutions.
260 Development Center A residential facility providing services to individuals who have been determined by the Department of Developmental Services (DDS) regional centers to require programs, training, care, treatment and supervision in a structured health facility setting on a 24-hour basis. This is not the same as Residential School/Dormitory, Health Institution, or State Hospital.
270 State Hospital A state hospital is a residential facility operated by the California Department of Mental Health (DMH). This is not the same as Residential School/Dormitory, Health Institution, or Development Center.
300 Other Any other type of residence not referenced in any other Primary Residence Category.
310 Unknown The primary residence of an individual cannot be determined. For example, the information is unavailable or was erroneously reported and is indecipherable.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
100 American Indian or Alaska Native A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America), and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment.
201 Chinese Chinese
202 Japanese Japanese
203 Korean Korean
204 Vietnamese Vietnamese
205 Asian Indian Asian Indian
206 Laotian Laotian
207 Cambodian Cambodian
208 Hmong Hmong
299 Other Asian Other Asian
301 Hawaiian Hawaiian
302 Guamanian Guamanian
303 Samoan Samoan
304 Tahitian Tahitian
399 Other Pacific Islander Other Pacific Islander
400 Filipino A person having origins in the original peoples of the Philippines. At the state level, this is a Race Ethnicity Category, but for federal reporting purposes, this is considered a sub-category of the Asian Race Ethnicity Category.
600 Black or African American A person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa. Terms such as Haitian or Negro can be used in addition to Black or African American.
700 White A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
100 American Indian or Alaska Native, Not Hispanic A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America), and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment.
200 Asian, Not Hispanic A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam.
300 Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, Not Hispanic A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands. The term Native Hawaiian does not include individuals who are native to the State of Hawaii by virtue of being born there. In addition to Native Hawaiians, Guamanians, and Samoans, this category would include the following Pacific Islander groups reported in the 1990 census: Carolinian, Fijian, Kosraean, Melanesian, Micronesian, Northern Mariana Islander, Palauan, Papua New Guinean, Ponapean (Pohnpelan), Polynesian, Solomon Islander, Tahitian, Tarawa Islander, Tokelauan, Tongan, Trukese (Chuukese), and Yapese.
500 Hispanic A person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race. The term, Spanish origin, can be used in addition to Hispanic or Latino.
600 Black or African American, Not Hispanic A person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa. Terms such as Haitian or Negro can be used in addition to Black or African American.
700 White, Not Hispanic A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa.
800 Two or More Races, Not Hispanic A person who has identified themselves as two or more races.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
CRSC Course Section Completion The record type used to submit course section completion data.
CRSE Course Section Enrollment The record type used to submit course section enrollment data.
SASS Staff Assignment The record type used to submit assignment data for staff.
SCSC Student Course Section Completion The record type used to submit student course section completion data.
SCSE Student Course Section Enrollment The record type used to submit student course section enrollment data.
SDEM Staff Demographics The record type used to submit demographic data for staff.
SDIS Student Discipline The record type used to submit discipline data for a student.
SECL SSID Enrollment Candidate List The record type used to submit the SSID Enrollment Candidate List.
SELA Student English Language Acquisition The record type used to sumbit Student English Language Acquisition data.
SENR SSID-Enrollment The record type used to submit data to create a SSID and maintain enrollments.
SHTH Student Health The record type used to submit health data for a student.
SIAD Student Information - Address The record type used to apply the effective date processing updates on the Student Address data elements.
SIDM Student Information - Demographic The record type used to apply the effective date processing updates on the Student Demographic data elements.
SIEL Student Information - EL The record type used to apply the effective date processing updates on the Student EL data elements.
SIGR Student Information - Grade The record type used to apply the effective date processing updates on the Student Grade data elements.
SINF Student Information - All The record type used to apply the effective date processing updates on all of the data elements in the record.
SIST Student Information - Standing The record type used to apply the effective date processing updates on the Student CTE data elements.
SPRG Student Program The record type used to submit program data for a student.
SWAV Student Waivers The record type used to submit waivers data for a student.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
1 Removal by Hearing Officer The student was removed by an impartial hearing officer based on a determination that the student's current placement may result in injury to the child or others.
2 Removal by School Personnel The student was removed by school personnel (other than the IEP team) to an interim alternative edcuational setting for no more than 45 days.
3 No Interim Removal The student was not removed and placed in an interim alternative educational setting.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
100 Graduated, standard HS diploma The student withdrew from/left school after meeting all state and local high school graduation requirements and the district/school has acceptable documentation that the student received a "regular high school diploma" equivalent to the standard high school diploma awarded to the preponderance of students in the State that is fully aligned with the State's standards and does not include a general equivalency diploma, certificate of completion, certificate of attendance, or any other similar or lesser credential, such as a diploma based on meeting Individualized Education Program (IEP) goals, OR as specified in California Education Code (EC) section 51225.1, a student in foster care, a student how is homeless, or a former juvenile court school student who transfers between schools any time after the completion of the pupil's second year of high school, completes all requirements specified in EC Section 51225.3. The exit date must align with the date the student completed the graduation requirements and was awarded a "regular high school diploma."
104 Completed all local and state graduation requirements, failed CAHSEE A student who was required to take the California High school Exit Exam (CAHSEE) left school after meeting all other state and local high school graduation requirements, but without passing CAHSEE. The student did not receive a standard high school diploma and there is no evidence that the student is in an academic program leading toward a high school diploma or its equivalent.
106 Grad, CAHSEE mods & waiver The student met all state and local graduation requirements, passing the CAHSEE with a modified passing score and obtained a waiver under Education Code 60851(c)(1)). Education Code 60851(c)(1) waives the requirement to successfully pass the exit examination as a condition of receiving a diploma of graduation or a condition of graduation from high school special education students.
108 Grad, CAHSEE exempt 108 - Grad, CAHSEE Exemption: The student left school after meeting all state and local high school graduation requirements by obtaining an an exemption from passing the California High School Exit Exam per Education Code 60852.3(a). Education Code60852.3(a) states: Notwithstanding any other provision of law, commencing with the 2009-10 school year, an eligible pupil with a disability is not required to pass the high school exit examination established pursuant to Section 60850 as a condition of receiving a diploma of graduation or as a condition of graduation from high school.
120 Special Education certificate of completion A student with exceptional needs (having an individualized education program [IEP]) left school after receiving a certificate or document of educational achievement or completion meeting the requirements of Education Code Section 56390.
250 Adult Ed High School Diploma The student withdrew from/left school to enroll in an Adult Education Program and the district/school has acceptable documentation that the student received an adult basic education high school diploma through an adult basic education program. The exit date must align with the date the student completed the requirements.
320 Received a High School Equivalency Certificate (and no standard HS diploma) The student withdrew from/left school and the district has acceptable documentation that the student received a High School Equivalency Certificate by passing one or more of the following exams: the General Educational Development (GED) exam, the Test Assessing Secondary Completion (TASC) exam, or the High School Equivalency Test (HiSet).
330 Passed CHSPE (and no standard HS diploma) Student left after passing the California High School Proficiency Exam (CHSPE), and the district has acceptable documentation.
360 Completed grade 12 without completing graduation requirements, not grad Student completed grade 12 or exceeded the maximum age for high school attendance but did not meet the state and/or local high school graduation requirements, and there is no evidence that the student is in an academic program leading toward a high school diploma or its equivalent. This does not include students who did not graduate because of failure to pass the California High School Exit Exam.
480 Promoted (matriculated) The student completed the highest grade level offered  at a school (excluding high school completion), left the school, and was expected to attend another California public school. Note. If the student has matriculated but is not expected to return to another California public school, use the exit code most representative of the student's final status (i.e., T200 [TransUS]).
Valid Code Value Name Definition
CA-AB Alberta The Canadian province of Alberta.
CA-BC British Columbia The Canadian province of British Columbia.
CA-MB Manitoba The Canadian province of Manitoba.
CA-NB New Brunswick The Canadian province of New Brunswick.
CA-NL Newfoundland and Labrador The Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador.
CA-NS Nova Scotia The Canadian province of Nova Scotia.
CA-NT Northwest Territories The Canadian province of Northwest Territories.
CA-NU Nunavut The Canadian province of Nunavut.
CA-ON Ontario The Canadian province of Ontario.
CA-PE Prince Edward Island The Canadian province of Prince Edward Island.
CA-QC Quebec The Canadian province of Quebec.
CA-SK Saskatchewan The Canadian province of Saskatchewan.
CA-YT Yukon Territory The Canadian province of Yukon Territory.
MX-AGU Aguascalientes The Mexican state of Aguascalientes
MX-BCN Baja California The Mexican state of Baja California
MX-BCS Baja California Sur The Mexican state of Baja California Sur
MX-CAM Campeche The Mexican state of Campeche
MX-CHH Chihuahua The Mexican state of Chihuahua
MX-CHP Chiapas The Mexican state of Chiapas
MX-COA Coahuila The Mexican state of Coahuila
MX-COL Colima The Mexican state of Colima
MX-DIF Distrito Federal The Mexican state of Distrito Federal
MX-DUR Durango The Mexican state of Durango
MX-GRO Guerrero The Mexican state of Guerrero
MX-GUA Guanajuato The Mexican state of Guanajuato
MX-HID Hidalgo The Mexican state of Hidalgo
MX-JAL Jalisco The Mexican state of Jalisco
MX-MEX Mexico The Mexican state of Mexico
MX-MIC Michoacan The Mexican state of Michoacan
MX-MOR Morelos The Mexican state of Morelos
MX-NAY Nayarit The Mexican state of Nayarit
MX-NLE Nuevo Leon The Mexican state of Nuevo Leon
MX-OAX Oaxaca The Mexican state of Oaxaca
MX-PUE Puebla The Mexican state of Puebla
MX-QUE QuerΘtaro The Mexican state of Queretaro
MX-ROO Quintana Roo The Mexican state of Quintana Roo
MX-SIN Sinaloa The Mexican state of Sinaloa
MX-SLP San Luis Potosi The Mexican state of San Luis Potosφ
MX-SON Sonora The Mexican state of Sonora
MX-TAB Tabasco The Mexican state of Tabasco
MX-TAM Tamaulipas The Mexican state of Tamaulipas
MX-TLA Tlaxcala The Mexican state of Tlaxcala
MX-VER Veracruz The Mexican state of Veracruz
MX-YUC Yucatan The Mexican state of Yucatan
MX-ZAC Zacatecas The Mexican state of Zacatecas
US-AA Armed Forces Americas The American state or territory of Armed Forces Americas.
US-AE Armed Forces Europe, Middle East, & Canada The American state or territory of Armed Forces Europe, Middle East, & Canada.
US-AK Alaska The American state or territory of Alaska.
US-AL Alabama The American state or territory of Alabama.
US-AP Armed Forces Pacific The American state or territory of Armed Forces Pacific.
US-AR Arkansas The American state or territory of Arkansas.
US-AS American Samoa The American state or territory of American Samoa.
US-AZ Arizona The American state or territory of Arizona.
US-CA California The American state or territory of California.
US-CO Colorado The American state or territory of Colorado.
US-CT Connecticut The American state or territory of Connecticut.
US-DC District of Columbia The American state or territory of District of Columbia.
US-DE Delaware The American state or territory of Delaware.
US-FL Florida The American state or territory of Florida.
US-FM Federated States of Micronesia The American state or territory of Federated States of Micronesia.
US-GA Georgia The American state or territory of Georgia.
US-GU Guam The American state or territory of Guam.
US-HI Hawaii The American state or territory of Hawaii.
US-IA Iowa The American state or territory of Iowa.
US-ID Idaho The American state or territory of Idaho.
US-IL Illinois The American state or territory of Illinois.
US-IN Indiana The American state or territory of Indiana.
US-KS Kansas The American state or territory of Kansas.
US-KY Kentucky The American state or territory of Kentucky.
US-LA Louisiana The American state or territory of Louisiana.
US-MA Massachusetts The American state or territory of Massachusetts.
US-MD Maryland The American state or territory of Maryland.
US-ME Maine The American state or territory of Maine.
US-MH Marshall Islands The American state or territory of Marshall Islands.
US-MI Michigan The American state or territory of Michigan.
US-MN Minnesota The American state or territory of Minnesota.
US-MO Missouri The American state or territory of Missouri.
US-MP Northern Mariana Islands The American state or territory of Northern Mariana Islands.
US-MS Mississippi The American state or territory of Mississippi.
US-MT Montana The American state or territory of Montana.
US-NC North Carolina The American state or territory of North Carolina.
US-ND North Dakota The American state or territory of North Dakota.
US-NE Nebraska The American state or territory of Nebraska.
US-NH New Hampshire The American state or territory of New Hampshire.
US-NJ New Jersey The American state or territory of New Jersey.
US-NM New Mexico The American state or territory of New Mexico.
US-NV Nevada The American state or territory of Nevada.
US-NY New York The American state or territory of New York.
US-OH Ohio The American state or territory of Ohio.
US-OK Oklahoma The American state or territory of Oklahoma.
US-OR Oregon The American state or territory of Oregon.
US-PA Pennsylvania The American state or territory of Pennsylvania.
US-PR Puerto Rico The American state or territory of Puerto Rico.
US-PW Palau The American state or territory of Palau.
US-RI Rhode Island The American state or territory of Rhode Island.
US-SC South Carolina The American state or territory of South Carolina.
US-SD South Dakota The American state or territory of South Dakota.
US-TN Tennessee The American state or territory of Tennessee.
US-TX Texas The American state or territory of Texas.
US-UT Utah The American state or territory of Utah.
US-VA Virginia The American state or territory of Virginia.
US-VI Virgin Islands The American state or territory of Virgin Islands.
US-VT Vermont The American state or territory of Vermont.
US-WA Washington The American state or territory of Washington.
US-WI Wisconsin The American state or territory of Wisconsin.
US-WV West Virginia The American state or territory of West Virginia.
US-WY Wyoming The American state or territory of Wyoming.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
E125 PriorComplSpecEd Student exited a special education transition program and was previously reported as receiving a special education certificate of completion, passing the California High School Proficiency Examination (CHSPE), or passing the General Educational Development (GED) test.
E130 Died Student died while enrolled in school or student completed the school year, was expected to return, and died during the summer break and the district/school has supporting written documentation.
E140 NoKnownEnrollTruant The student, age six up until age 18, is truant as defined by Education Code Section 48260 (a), and: (1) has been referred to a local or county School Attendance Review Board (SARB) by the local educational agency (LEA) after the LEA has taken all statutory truancy intervention steps; or (2) cannot be located by the LEA after the LEA has completed a full investigation as to the whereabouts of the student.
E150 MidYearEnrollmentUpdate The student is not exiting the school but the one or more of the following pieces of information about the student is being updated:
• Grade level, greater than 14 days before the end of the school year; or
• Student School Transfer Code; or
• District of Geographic Residence, or
• Enrollment Status Code

If the student exited and left the school use the appropriate exit code, for example:
• T160-Transfer to another CA school; or
• E155 [YearEndGradeLevelExit] if a grade level exit took place during the last 14 days of the academic year because of summer break or year-end intersession.
• E230 [Completer Exit] and School Completion Status=480 [Promoted/ Matriculated] and not E155 if the student completed the grade that is being exited and that grade-level is the last grade offered at the school.
E155 YearEndEnrlmntExitSameSchl The student exited a grade level (excluding high school completion) during the last 14 days of the current academic year because of summer break or year-end intersession . This exit code is to be used for students thought to be returning to the school. If the student is completing the school year, but known to be transferring to another school or some other type of exit, use the appropriate exit code (for example T160 Transfer to another California school).
The grade level exit at the end of the year indicates only that the student exited the grade level at the end of the year. The student's enrollment for the next academic year may be either a grade-level promotion, grade retention, or grade demotion.
Note: If the student completed the last grade offered at the school, use Student Exit Category=E230 [Completer Exit] and School Completion Status=480 [Promoted/ Matriculated] instead of this code.
E170 SecEnrlExit
NEW for 2016/17!
Student who was enrolled with a secondary Enrollment Status Code (20) in any grade, exited/withdrew from school.
E230 CompleterExit Student left school after completing their academic program at this school, whether or not the completion resulted in high school graduation. This includes students who reach the maximum age for high school but do not have enough credits to graduate.
E300 ExpellNoKnownEnroll Student left school after being expelled, was subsequently referred to another educational service institution, but never showed up, and attempts to locate the student were unsuccessful. Do NOT use this code if the district took the appropriate steps to refer the student to the Student Attendance Review Board (SARB); use E140 (TruantNoKnownEnroll). Only use this code if the student was exited without first being referred to the SARB.
E400 OtherOrUnknown The student withdrew from/left school for reasons that cannot be determined or for reasons other that those described in the Student Exit Category codes. Do NOT use this code for students who were referred for truancy intervention, as outlined in E140 (NoKnownEnrollTruant).
E410 MedicalRsns Student withdrew from/left school due to medical reasons.
E450 PreK-6Exit Infant or student in pre-kindergarten through grade six, or ungraded elementary, exited/withdrew from school; or the student exited school during a temporary break such as summer vacation or year-round intersession, but was expected to return to the same school after the break.
E490 Summer or Intersession Exit The student exited school during a temporary break such as summer vacation or year-round intersession, but was expected to return to the same school after the break.
N420 NoShowSameSchl Student completed an academic year at a school and did not return to the same school the following year when the student was expected to return and no other exit code is appropriate.
N430 NoShowMatricSchl No show, matriculating. Student successfully completed a grade level in a school and did not attend the school of matriculation where the student was expected to attend. For example, a student who completed 8th grade at a junior high and did not show up at the expected comprehensive high school. Note: This code is to be used by the receiving school that expected the student to enroll.
N470 NoShow The student’s enrollment was exited because the student, who has no prior enrollments in the school, was pre-enrolled but did not show up as expected to attend the school. This exit represents a nullification of the pre-enrollment and should only be used for a student’s: (1) first enrollment in CALPADS (e.g. kindergarten students or transfer students from a private school or a school outside of California; or (2) first time enrollment in a school as a result of matriculation from another school.
T160 TransCASchlRegular The student withdrew from/left school and the district has acceptable documentation that the student has transferred (not referred by a school or district) to another California public school (within or outside the district), including transfers to a non-sectarian, non-public certified (NPS) school. Transfers that are a result of referrals made by a school or district are to be coded as T165 or T167 as appropriate.
T165 TransSpecDiscRsnsOrJudg The student was withdrawn from one school due to specified disciplinary reasons, and transferred to another California public school (within or outside the district). The district has acceptable documentation of this transfer. The specified disciplinary reasons include: referral by a juvenile court judge or other correctional or judicial official; or expulsions pursuant to Education Code Section 48915 (a), (b), or (c) and where the student is known to be enrolled in another institution.Do NOT use this code if: - student is expelled and referred to an alternative education program for disciplinary reasons other than those specified in Education Code Section 48915 (a), (b), or (c). (use T167 [TransAltSchlPgm]) - an expelled student is NOT known to be enrolled in another institution (use E300 [ExpelledNoKnownEnroll]) - a truant student has not been attending and has been referred for truancy intervention (use E140 [NoKnownEnrollTruant]) - a student is referred by the school or district to an alternative education program for non-disciplinary reasons. (use T167 [TransAltSchlPrgml]) - a student is transferred voluntarily, without a referral and for non-disciplinary reasons. (use T160 [TransCASchlRegular])
T167 TransAltSchlPrgm The student was referred by a school and/or school district and the district has acceptable documentation that the student enrolled to enroll in an alternative education school or voluntarily transferred to an independent study program in another California public school in the same district or in a different district for one of the following reasons: (1) a student was referred or voluntarily transferred to an independent study program for non-disciplinary reasons; or (2) The student was referred by school and/or school district to withdraw from/leave school and transfer to an alternative education school or to a non-alternative education school independent study program for any disciplinary reason except those specified in T165. Do NOT use this code for: (1) - interdistrict transfers (i.e., formal agreement pursuant to Education Code Section 46600, NCLB public school choice-program improvement, NCLB public school choice-persistently dangerous, district of choice transfers pursuant to Education Code Section 48313); or (2) - students who are referred to an alternative education school or independent study program for disciplinary reasons by a juvenile court judge or other correctional or judicial officer or who are expelled pursuant to Education Code Section 48915 (a), (b), or (c). (Use T165)
T180 TransPrivate Student withdrew from/left school and the district has received acceptable documentation of enrollment in a private school in California. Do not use this code for transfers to a non-sectarian school. Student Exit Category Code T160 (TransCASchlRegular) should be used.
T200 TransUS Student withdrew from/left school and the district has received "official written documentation" that the student has transferred to another public or private U.S. school outside California.
T240 TransOutUS Student withdrew from/left school to move to another country and the district/school has supporting written documentation.
T260 TransInAdult Student withdrew from/left school to enroll in an adult education program.
T270 TransDropAdult Student withdrew from/left school to enroll in an adult education program in order to obtain a GED certificate or high school diploma, but subsequently dropped out of the adult education program. Note: This code is to be used by the last secondary (non-adult education) school attended.
T280 TransCollege Student withdrew from/left school to enroll in college.
T310 TransHealthFacil Student withdrew from/left school and entered a health care facility.
T370 TransInstHSDipl Student withdrew from/left school to enroll in another program that is not primarily academic (military, job corps, justice system, etc., and not an adult education program) and the student is participating in an educational program from which they can expect to earn a “regular high school diploma” equivalent to the standard high school diploma awarded to the preponderance of students in a State that is fully aligned with the State’s standards and does not include a general equivalency diploma, certificate of completion, certificate of attendance, or any other similar or lesser credential, such as a diploma based on meeting Individualized Education Program (IEP) goals. A student who is in a prison or in a juvenile facility awaiting a hearing or release and not yet adjudicated as delinquent may not be removed from the cohort of the sending school or district. Instead, the school or district must wait until the student has received such adjudication and determined that the student will transfer to a facility that has a school or educational program from which the student can expect to receive a “regular high school diploma.” The district is required to obtain and maintain acceptable written documentation of this transfer.
T380 TransInstNoHSDip Student withdrew from/left school to enroll in another program that is not primarily academic (military, job corps, justice system, etc.) and the student is not participating in an educational program from which they can expect to earn a "regular high school diploma" equivalent to the standard high school diploma awarded to the preponderance of students in a State that is fully aligned with the State's standards and does not include a general equivalency diploma, certificate of completion, certificate of attendance, or any other similar or lesser credential, such as a diploma based on meeting IEP goals.
T460 TransHomeSchl Student withdrew from/left school for a home school setting not affiliated with a private school or independent study program at a public school.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
100 Possession, Sale, Furnishing a Firearm EC 48915(c)(1)Possessing, selling, or otherwise furnishing a firearm. This subdivision does not apply to an act of possessing a firearm if the pupil had obtained prior written permission to possess the firearm from a certificated school employee, which is concurred in by the principal or the designee of the principal. This subdivision applies to an act of possessing a firearm only if the possession is verified by an employee of a school district.
101 Possession, Sale, Furnishing a Firearm, Knife, Explosive, or Other Dangerous Object EC 48900(b) Possessed, sold, or otherwise furnished any firearm, knife, explosive, or other dangerous object, unless, in the case of possession of any object of this type, the pupil had obtained written permission to possess the item from a certificated school employee, which is concurred in by the principal or the designee of the principal.
102 Possession of an Imitation Firearm EC 48900(m) Possessed an imitation firearm. As used in this section, imitation firearm means a replica of a firearm that is so substantially similar in physical properties to an existing firearm as to lead a reasonable person to conclude that the replica is a firearm.
103 Brandishing a Knife EC 48915(c)(2) Brandishing a knife at another person.
104 Possession of a Knife or Dangerous Object EC 48915(a)(1)(B) Possession of any knife or other dangerous object of no reasonable use to the pupil.
105 Possession of an Explosive EC 48915(c)(5) Possession of an explosive
200 Sale of Controlled Substance EC 48915(c)(3) Unlawfully selling a controlled substance listed in Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 11053) of Division 10 of the Health and Safety Code.
201 Possession of Controlled Substance EC 48915(a)(1)(C) Unlawful possession of any controlled substance listed in Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 11053) of Division 10 of the Health and Safety Code, except for the first offense for the possession of not more than one avoirdupois ounce of marijuana, other than concentrated cannabis.
202 Possession, Use, Sale, or Furnishing a Controlled Substance, Alcohol, Intoxicant EC 48900(c) Unlawfully possessed, used, sold, or otherwise furnished, or been under the influence of, any controlled substance listed in Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 11053) of Division 10 of the Health and Safety Code, an alcoholic beverage, or an intoxicant of any kind.
203 Offering, Arranging, or Negotiating Sale of Controlled Substances, Alcohol, Intoxicants EC 48900(d) Unlawfully offered, arranged, or negotiated to sell any controlled substance listed in Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 11053) of Division 10 of the Health and Safety Code, an alcoholic beverage, or an intoxicant of any kind, and either sold, delivered, or otherwise furnished to any person another liquid, substance, or material and represented the liquid, substance, or material as a controlled substance, alcoholic beverage, or intoxicant.
204 Offering, Arranging, or Negotiating Sale of Drug Paraphernalia EC 48900(j) Unlawfully possessed or unlawfully offered, arranged, or negotiated to sell any drug paraphernalia, as defined in Section 11014.5 of the Health and Safety Code.
205 Offering, Arranging, or Negotiating Sale of Soma EC 48900(p): Unlawfully offered, arranged to sell, negotiated to sell, or sold the prescription drug Soma.
300 Possession or Use of Tobacco Products EC 48900(h) Possessed or used tobacco, or any products containing tobacco or nicotine products, including, but not limited to, cigarettes, cigars, miniature cigars, clove cigarettes, smokeless tobacco, snuff, chew packets, and betel. However, this section does not prohibit use or possession by a pupil of his or her own prescription products.
400 Sexual Battery EC 48915(c)(4) committing a sexual battery as defined in subdivision (n) of Section 48900. 48900(n) committed a sexual battery as defined in Section 243.4 of the Penal Code.
401 Sexual Assault EC 48915(c)(4) Committing or attempting to commit a sexual assault as defined in subdivision (n) of Section 48900. 48900(n) committed or attempted to commit a sexual assault as defined in Section 261, 266c, 286, 288, 288a, or 289 of the Penal Code.
403 Sexual Harassment EC 48900.2 and 212.5 For the purposes of this chapter, the conduct described in Section 212.5 must be considered by a reasonable person of the same gender as the victim to be sufficiently severe or pervasive to have a negative impact upon the individual's academic performance or to create an intimidating, hostile, or offensive educational environment. This section shall not apply to pupils enrolled in kindergarten and grades 1 to 3, inclusive.Sexual harassment means unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal, visual, or physical conduct of a sexual nature, made by someone from or in the work or educational setting, under any of the following conditions: (a) Submission to the conduct is explicitly or implicitly made a term or a condition of an individual's employment, academic status, or progress. (b) Submission to, or rejection of, the conduct by the individuals used as the basis of employment or academic decisions affecting the individual. (c) The conduct has the purpose or effect of having a negative impact upon the individual's work or academic performance, or of creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work or educational environment. (d) Submission to, or rejection of, the conduct by the individual is used as the basis for any decision affecting the individual regarding benefits and services, honors, programs, or activities available at or through the educational institution.
500 Caused Physical Injury EC 48915(a)(1)(A) Causing serious physical injury to another person, except in self-defense.
501 Caused, Attempted, or Threatened Physical Injury EC 48900(a)(1) Caused, attempted to cause, or threatened serious physical injury to another person .
502 Aided or Abetted Physical Injury EC 48900(t) A pupil who aids or abets, as defined in Section 31 of the Penal Code, the infliction or attempted infliction of physical injury to another person may suffer suspension, but not expulsion, pursuant to this section, except that a pupil who has been adjudged by a juvenile court to have committed, as an aider and abettor, a crime of physical violence in which the victim suffered great bodily injury or serious bodily injury shall be subject to discipline pursuant to subdivision (a).
503 Committed Assault or Battery on a School Employee EC 48915(a)(1)(E) Assault or battery, as defined in Sections 240 and 242 of the Penal Code, upon any school employee.
504 Used Force or Violence EC 48900(a)(2) Willfully used force or violence upon the person of another, except in self-defense.
505 Committed an act of Hate Violence EC 48900.3: In addition to the reasons set forth in Sections 48900 and 48900.2, a pupil in any of grades 4 to 12, inclusive, may be suspended from school or recommended for expulsion if the superintendent or the principal of the school in which the pupil is enrolled determines that the pupil has caused, attempted to cause, threatened to cause, or participated in an act of, hate violence, as defined in subdivision (e) of Section 233.
506 Harassment or Intimidation EC 48900.4: In addition to the grounds specified in Sections 48900 and 48900.2, a pupil enrolled in any of grades 4 to 12, inclusive, may be suspended from school or recommended for expulsion if the superintendent or the principal of the school in which the pupil is enrolled determines that the pupil has intentionally engaged in harassment, threats, or intimidation, directed against school district personnel or pupils, that is sufficiently severe or pervasive to have the actual and reasonably expected effect of materially disrupting classwork, creating substantial disorder, and invading the rights of either school personnel or pupils by creating an intimidating or hostile educational environment.
507 Harassment, Intimidation of a Witness EC 48900(o) Harassed, threatened, or intimidated a pupil who is a complaining witness or a witness in a school disciplinary proceeding for the purpose of either preventing that pupil from being a witness or retaliating against that pupil for being a witness, or both.
508 Made Terrorist Threats EC 48900.7 - (a) In addition to the reasons specified in Sections 48900, 48900.2, 48900.3, and 48900.4, a pupil may be suspended from school or recommended for expulsion if the superintendent or the principal of the school in which the pupil is enrolled determines that the pupil has made terroristic threats against school officialsor school property, or both. (b) For the purposes of this section, terroristic threat shall include any statement, whether written or oral, by a person who willfully threatens to commit a crime which will result in death, great bodily injury to another person, or property damage in excess of one thousand dollars ($1,000), with the specific intent that the statement is to be taken as a threat, even if there is no intent of actually carrying it out, which, on its face and under the circumstances in which it is made, is so unequivocal, unconditional, immediate, and specific as to convey to the person threatened, a gravity of purpose and an immediate prospect of execution of the threat, and thereby causes that person reasonably to be in sustained fear for his or her own safety or for his or her immediate family's safety, or for the protection of school district property, or the personal property of the person threatened or his or her immediate family.
509 Hazing EC 48900(q) Engaged in, or attempted to engage in, hazing as defined in CA Education Code Section 32050
510 Obscene Acts, Profanity, and Vulgarity EC 48900(i) Committed an obscene act or engaged in habitual profanity or vulgarity.
511 Disruption, Defiance EC 48900(k) Disrupted school activities or otherwise willfully defied the valid authority of supervisors, teachers, administrators, school officials, or other school personnel engaged in the performance of their duties.
512 Property Damage EC 48900(f) Caused or attempted to cause damage to school property or private property.
513 Bullying EC 48900 (r): Engaged in an act of bullying, including, but not limited to,bullying committed by means of an electronic act, as defined in subdivisions (f) and (g) of Section 32261, directed specifically toward a pupil or school personnel.
600 Robbery or Extortion EC 48915(a)(1)(D) Robbery or extortion. 48900(e) Committed or attempted to commit robbery or extortion. Robbery or extortion.
601 Property Theft EC 48900(g) Stolen or attempted to steal school property or private property.
602 Received Stolen Property EC 48900(l) Knowingly received stolen school property or private property.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
1 Formal Interdistrict Transfer Agreement This is a formal agreement between two districts that approves a transfer from one district to another pursuant to Education Code Section 46600. This category does not include transfers that occur as a result of establishing residency in one of the following ways: 1) EC 48204b a parent or guardian requests that their child be transferred to a school district where the parent or legal guardian is physically employed; or 2) enrollment in a charter school outside the district of residence.
2 Public School Choice - Program Improvement The Public School Choice transfer option must be offered to all students enrolled in Title I schools that have been identified for school improvement, corrective action, or restructuring. These students must be given the opportunity to transfer to another public school in the LEA that is not identified as a program improvement school.
3 Unsafe School Choice Option This is a transfer where the student exercised the option to transfer from a school which the state has identified as persistently dangerous, or in which the student was a victim of violent crime on school property.
4 District of Choice Transfer This is a transfer where the student transferred into the district pursuant to the district having deemed itself a District of Choice, pursuant to Education Code Section 48313.
5 Disciplinary COE School Transfer "A student who transferred to a county office of education school (not a juvenile court school), including charter schools operating county programs, was transferred to that school for one or more of the following reasons: • Probation referral pursuant to Sections 300, 601, 602, and 654 of the Welfare and Institutions Code. • On probation or parole and not in attendance in a school other than the county office of education school. • Expelled for any of the reasons specified in subdivision (a) or (c) of Education Code Section 48915"
6 Other Transfer "This is any other type of student transfer that may occur including, but not limited to: • Students voluntarily choosing to transfer to a county office of education school, who were not transferred due to any of the reasons specified in the ""Disciplinary COE School Transfer"" code. • Students who have established residency because their parents work in the area; • Special education students who are transferring to another school because it written into their Individualized Education Plan (IEP). • Students who are transferring to a charter school that is outside their district of residence"
C Conversion Only This code is used to convert data from SRRTS to CALPADS. These are values that were not collected in CSIS, but will be collected in CALPADS.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
A Add-Update The transaction type used to add or update information in CALPADS.
D Delete The transaction type used to delete information from CALPADS.
R yyy zz
Valid Code Value Name Definition
10 Handgun A firearm that can be used with one hand.
20 Shotgun or Rifle A firearm with a rifled bore, designed to be fired from the shoulder or a smoothbore gun that fires shot over short ranges
30 Other Firearm As defined in 18 USC 921, including any weapon (including a starter gun) which will or is designed to or may readily be converted to expel a projectile by the action of any explosive; the frame or receiver of handguns and rifles/shotguns; any firearm muffler or firearm silencer; any destructive device, which includes (a) any explosive, incendiary, or poison gas (1) bomb, (2) grenade, (3) rocket having a propellant charge of more than four ounces, (4) missile having an explosive or incendiary charge of more than one-quarter ounce, (5) mine, or (6) similar device; (b) any weapon which will, or which may be readily converted to, expel a projectile by the action of an explosive or other propellant, and which has any barrel with a bore of more than one-half inch in diameter; (c) any combination or parts either designed or intended for use in converting any device into any destructive device, and from which a destructive device may be readily assembled.
40 Other Weapon Includes any other weapon not included in codes 10- 30. This category should NOT be used for imitation firearms.
50 Multiple Weapons with Firearm More than one weapon, one or more of which was a firearm, was used by a single student during an Offense.
Valid Code Value Name Definition
01 Testing March 4 Testing March 4
02 Testing April 29 Testing April 29
03 EAP Essay EAP Essay

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