Select CALPADS Code Category to review: (Version 11.0, July 1, 2019)

Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
FYFull YearA session that lasts the full academic year.
H1First HexmesterThe first of six hexmesters in an Academic Year.
H2Second HexmesterThe second of six hexmesters in an Academic Year.
H3Third HexmesterThe third of six hexmesters in an Academic Year.
H4Fourth HexmesterThe fourth of six hexmesters in an Academic Year.
H5Fifth HexmesterThe fifth of six hexmesters in an Academic Year.
H6Sixth HexmesterThe sixth of six hexmesters in an Academic Year.
ISIntersessionAn academic session that occurs during a short break during the academic year (not necessarily a longer, summer break), typical of year-round schools.
Q1First QuarterThe first of four quarters of an Academic Year.
Q2Second QuarterThe second of four quarters of an Academic Year.
Q3Third QuarterThe third of four quarters of an Academic Year.
Q4Fourth QuarterThe fourth and final quarter of an Academic Year.
S1First SemesterThe first of two semesters in an Academic Year.
S2Second SemesterThe Second of two semesters in an Academic Year.
SPSupplemental SessionA session that occurs on evenings, after school, or weekends.
SSSummer SessionAn academic session that occurs during the summer break.
T1First TrimesterThe first of three trimesters in an Academic Year.
T2Second TrimesterThe second of three trimesters in an Academic Year.
T3Third TrimesterThe third of three trimesters in an Academic Year.
Z1Other First TermThe first term in a set of terms not otherwise defined in this code set.
Z2Other Second TermThe second term in a set of terms not otherwise defined in this code set.
Z3Other Third TermThe third term in a set of terms not otherwise defined in this code set.
Z4Other Fourth TermThe fourth term in a set of terms not otherwise defined in this code set.
Z5Other Fifth TermThe fifth term in a set of terms not otherwise defined in this code set.
Z6Other Sixth TermThe sixth term in a set of terms not otherwise defined in this code set.
Z7Other Seventh TermThe seventh term in a set of terms not otherwise defined in this code set.
Z8Other Eighth TermThe eighth term in a set of terms not otherwise defined in this code set.
Z9Other Ninth TermThe ninth term in a set of terms not otherwise defined in this code set.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
10Yes - InvitedA representative of a participating agency was invited to the Individualized Education Program (IEP) Team meeting with the prior consent of the parent or student who has reached the age of majority
20No - Not InvitedA representative of a participating agency was NOT invited to the Individualized Education Program (IEP) Team meeting with the prior consent of the parent or student who has reached the age of majority
30Invite Not Applicable (N/A)Agency Representative IEP Participation does not apply for the student.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
9002Advanced Placement (AP) Studio Art:3-D DesignSee definition for State Course Code
9003Advanced Placement (AP) Studio Art: 2-D DesignSee definition for State Course Code
9004Advanced Placement (AP) Studio Art: DrawingSee definition for State Course Code
9005Advanced Placement (AP) Art HistorySee definition for State Course Code
9007International Baccalaureate (IB) Visual ArtsSee definition for State Course Code
9052International Baccalaureate (IB) Business and ManagementSee definition for State Course Code
9066Advanced Placement (AP) Computer Science PrinciplesSee definition for State Course Code
9067Advanced Placement (AP) Computer science ASee definition for State Course Code
9068International Baccalaureate (IB) Information Technology in a Global SocietySee definition for State Course Code
9069International Baccalaureate (IB) Computer scienceSee definition for State Course Code
9081International Baccalaureate (IB) DanceSee definition for State Course Code
9093International Baccalaureate (IB) FilmSee definition for State Course Code
9095International Baccalaureate (IB) TheatreSee definition for State Course Code
9115International Baccalaureate (IB) Literature and Performance SLSee definition for State Course Code
9116International Baccalaureate (IB) Language A: Language and LiteratureSee definition for State Course Code
9117International Baccalaureate (IB) Language A: LiteratureSee definition for State Course Code
9118Advanced Placement (AP) English Literature and CompositionSee definition for State Course Code
9119Advanced Placement (AP) English Language and CompositionSee definition for State Course Code
9140International Baccalaureate (IB) Literature and Performance SL (non-English)See definition for State Course Code
9141International Baccalaureate (IB) Language A: Language and Literature (non-English)See definition for State Course Code
9142International Baccalaureate (IB) Language A: Literature (non-English)See definition for State Course Code
9143International Baccalaureate (IB) Language BSee definition for State Course Code
9144International Baccalaureate (IB) Language ab initioSee definition for State Course Code
9145International Baccalaureate (IB) Classical LanguagesSee definition for State Course Code
9146Advanced Placement (AP) Japanese Language and CultureSee definition for State Course Code
9147Advanced Placement (AP) Chinese Language and CultureSee definition for State Course Code
9148Advanced Placement (AP) Italian Language and CultureSee definition for State Course Code
9149Advanced Placement (AP) Spanish Literature and CultureSee definition for State Course Code
9150Advanced Placement (AP) Spanish Language and CultureSee definition for State Course Code
9151Advanced Placement (AP) Latin See definition for State Course Code
9152Advanced Placement (AP) German Language and CultureSee definition for State Course Code
9153Advanced Placement (AP) French Language and CultureSee definition for State Course Code
9182International Baccalaureate (IB) Theory of KnowledgeSee definition for State Course Code
9183International Baccalaureate (IB) Social and Cultural AnthropologySee definition for State Course Code
9184International Baccalaureate (IB) PhilosophySee definition for State Course Code
9185International Baccalaureate (IB) PsychologySee definition for State Course Code
9186International Baccalaureate (IB) HistorySee definition for State Course Code
9187International Baccalaureate (IB) GeographySee definition for State Course Code
9188International Baccalaureate (IB) EconomicsSee definition for State Course Code
9189International Baccalaureate (IB) Global PoliticsSee definition for State Course Code
9190International Baccalaureate (IB) World Religions SLSee definition for State Course Code
9191Advanced Placement (AP) World HistorySee definition for State Course Code
9192Advanced Placement (AP) Human GeographySee definition for State Course Code
9193Advanced Placement (AP) PsychologySee definition for State Course Code
9194Advanced Placement (AP) United States HistorySee definition for State Course Code
9195Advanced Placement (AP) European HistorySee definition for State Course Code
9196Advanced Placement (AP) United States Government & PoliticsSee definition for State Course Code
9197Advanced Placement (AP) Comparative Government & PoliticsSee definition for State Course Code
9198Advanced Placement (AP) MicroeconomicsSee definition for State Course Code
9199Advanced Placement (AP) MacroeconomicsSee definition for State Course Code
9225Advanced Placement (AP) ResearchSee definition for State Course Code
9226Advanced Placement (AP) SeminarSee definition for State Course Code
9266Advanced Placement (AP) StatisticsSee definition for State Course Code
9267Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus BCSee definition for State Course Code
9268Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus ABSee definition for State Course Code
9269International Baccalaureate (IB) Further Mathematics HLSee definition for State Course Code
9270International Baccalaureate (IB) Mathematics higher levelSee definition for State Course Code
9271International Baccalaureate (IB) Mathematics SLSee definition for State Course Code
9272International Baccalaureate (IB) Mathematical Studies SLSee definition for State Course Code
9300Advanced Placement (AP) Music TheorySee definition for State Course Code
9302International Baccalaureate (IB) MusicSee definition for State Course Code
9344Advanced Placement (AP) Physics 2: Algebra-basedSee definition for State Course Code
9345Advanced Placement (AP) Physics 1: Algebra-basedSee definition for State Course Code
9346Advanced Placement (AP) Environmental scienceSee definition for State Course Code
9347Advanced Placement (AP) Physics C: Electricity and MagnetismSee definition for State Course Code
9348Advanced Placement (AP) Physics C: MechanicsSee definition for State Course Code
9349Advanced Placement (AP) ChemistrySee definition for State Course Code
9350Advanced Placement (AP) BiologySee definition for State Course Code
9351International Baccalaureate (IB) Sports Exercise and Health ScienceSee definition for State Course Code
9352International Baccalaureate (IB) Design technologySee definition for State Course Code
9354International Baccalaureate (IB) Environmental Systems and SocietiesSee definition for State Course Code
9355International Baccalaureate (IB) PhysicsSee definition for State Course Code
9356International Baccalaureate (IB) ChemistrySee definition for State Course Code
9357International Baccalaureate (IB) BiologySee definition for State Course Code

Please Note: Most of these assessments are no longer in use. CALPADS has yet to update these to CAASPP/ELPAC/CAST/CAA, etc.

Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
Aprenda/3Achievement Test for English Learners in their primary language(Spanish)The Aprenda/3 is an assessment that measures the academicachievement of K-12 Spanish-speaking students in their nativelanguage.
CAHSEECalifornia High School Exit ExamThe CAHSEE is an assessment that must be passed in order toreceive a high school diploma.

NOTE: The CAHSEE test was retired in 2014 and no longer required.

CAPACalifornia Alternate Performance AssessmentThe California Alternate Performance Assessment is given tostudents with significant cognitive disabilities whose disabilitiesprevent them from taking the California Standards Tests and theCAT/6 Survey.
CAT-6California Achievement Test Sixth EditionThe California Achievement Test Sixth Edition is the normativecomponent of California's standardized assessment system. It isonly administered to students taking the grades 3 and 7 tests. Ittests Reading, Language Arts, Spelling, and Mathematics. The CAT/6Survey allows a comparison of California students against othersfrom across the nation, and provides a snapshot of Californiastudents referenced against a national cross section. Its contentreflects national standards and its results contribute to theacademic performance index.
CELDTCalifornia English Language Development TestThe California English Language Development Test is a requiredstate assessment for English language proficiency that must begiven to students whose primary language is other thanEnglish.
CMACalifornia Modified AssessmentThe California Modified Assessment (CMA) is a grade-levelassessment for students who have an individualized educationprogram (IEP) plan, are receiving grade-level instruction and, evenwith interventions, will not achieve grade-level proficiency withinthe year covered by the student's IEP plan. The purpose of thesetests is to allow students to demonstrate achievement of thecontent standards in English language arts, mathematics, andscience. The CMA test format is designed to provide students withdisabilities greater access to an assessment of the Californiacontent standards.
CSTCalifornia Standards TestThe California Standards Test is an assessment measuringprogress toward California's state-adopted academic contentstandards, which describe what students should know and be able todo in each grade and subject tested.
DRDPDesired Results Developmental ProfileThe Desired Results system is an accountability initiative ofthe California Department of Education (CDE) developed to determinethe effectiveness of its child development and early childhoodspecial education services and programs. The system is intended toensure that children enrolled in state-funded preschool programsare benefiting from those programs. Central to the Desired ResultsSystem are the assessment instruments that measure childrens'progress. These instruments, the Desired Results DevelopmentalProfiles (DRDP), comprise the child assessment component of theDesired Results system.
LOCELLocal English Learner AssessmentA local assessment administered (as an alternative to theCalifornia English Language Development Test) to assess Englishlanguage proficiency.
STSStandards-based Test in SpanishThe Standards-based Tests in Spanish are multiple-choice teststhat are required for Spanish-speaking English learners who receiveinstruction in Spanish or who have been enrolled in a U.S. schoolfor less than 12 months.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
1Assessment Period 1Locally defined date.
2Assessment Period 2Locally defined date.
3Assessment Period 3Locally defined date
4Assessment Period 4Locally defined date.
5Assessment Period 5Locally defined date.
6Assessment Period 6Locally defined date.
7Assessment Period 7Locally defined date.
8Assessment Period 8Locally defined date.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
1Regional Occupational Center or Program (ROC/P)The Career Technical Education course is provided by theRegional Occupational Center or Program (ROC/P).
2DistrictThe Career Technical Education course is provided by thedistrict.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
AGRAgriculture and Natural ResourcesThe Agriculture and Natural Resources sector is designed toprovide a foundation in agriculture for all agriculture students inCalifornia. Students engage in an instructional program thatintegrates academic and technical preparation and focuses on careerawareness, career exploration, and skill preparation in sevenpathways. The pathways emphasize real-world, occupationallyrelevant experiences of significant scope and depth in AgriculturalBusiness, Agricultural Mechanics, Agriscience, Animal Science,Forestry and Natural Resources, Ornamental Horticulture, and Plantand Soil Science. Integral components of classroom and laboratoryinstruction, supervised agricultural experience projects, andleadership and interpersonal skills development prepare studentsfor continued training, advanced educational opportunities, orentry to a career.
ARTArts, Media, and EntertainmentOf all the career industries, the Arts, Media, andEntertainment sector requires perhaps the greatestcross-disciplinary interaction and development because the work inthis sector has a propensity to be largely project-based, requiringuniquely independent work and self-management career skills. Newtechnological developments are also constantly reshaping theboundaries and skill sets of many arts career pathways.Consequently, core arts sector occupations demand constantlyvarying combinations of artistic imagination, metaphoricrepresentation, symbolic connections, and technical skills.Successful career preparation involves both in-depth and broadacademic preparation as well as the cultivation of such intangibleassets as flexibility, problem-solving abilities, and interpersonalskills. Careers in the Arts, Media, and Entertainment sector fallin three general pathways: Media and Design Arts, Performing Arts,and Production and Managerial Arts. The foundation and pathwaystandards make explicit the appropriate knowledge, skills, andpractical experience students should have to pursue their chosenprofession through whatever course of postsecondary, collegiate,and graduate training or apprenticeship it may require. Learningthe skills and knowledge for creating, refining, and exhibitingworks of art promotes teamwork, communication, creative thinking,and decision-making abilitiesùall traits needed to functionsuccessfully in the competitive and media-rich twenty-firstcentury. Through the manipulation of sight, sound, and motion,those choosing a pathway from this sector reach out in unique waysto enhance the quality of life for those around them.
BLDBuilding and Construction TradesThe Building Trades and Construction sector provides afoundation in the building trades and construction industry forsecondary students in California. Students engage in aninstructional program that integrates academic and technicalpreparation and focuses on career awareness, career exploration,and skill preparation in the building trades and constructionindustry. The sector encompasses four career pathways:Cabinetmaking and Wood Products, Engineering and HeavyConstruction, Mechanical Construction, and Residential andCommercial Construction. These pathways emphasize processes,systems, and the way in which structures are built. The knowledgeand skills are acquired in a sequential, standards-based pathwayprogram that integrates hands-on, project-based, and work-basedinstruction as well as internship, community classroom, workexperience, apprenticeship, and cooperative career technicaleducation. Standards included in the Building Trades andConstruction sector are designed to prepare students for technicaltraining, postsecondary education, and entry to a career.
EDUEducation, Child Development, and Family ServicesThe Education, Child Development, and Family Services sector iscomposed of four career pathways: Child Development, ConsumerServices, Education, and Family and Human Services. The highstaffing needs and growing emphasis on improving education willcreate exciting career opportunities in those fields. The ChildDevelopment Pathway provides students with the skills and knowledgethey need to pursue careers in child care and related fields, andthe Education Pathway emphasizes the preparation of students tobecome teachers. The Consumer Services Pathway gives students theemployment and management skills needed in careers helpingconsumers. Students pursuing careers in the Family and HumanServices Pathway learn the skills they need for careers related tofamily and social services. The standards are designed to integrateacademic and career technical concepts. The components of thepathways support classroom and laboratory instruction or providesupervised, work-based learning experiences and leadershipdevelopment.
ENGEngineering and ArchitectureThe Engineering and Design sector is designed to provide afoundation in engineering and design for students in California.Students are engaged in an instructional program that integratesacademic and technical preparation and focuses on career awareness,career exploration, and career preparation in five pathways. Thefollowing pathways emphasize real-world, occupationally relevantexperiences of significant scope and depth: Architectural andStructural Engineering; Computer Hardware, Electrical, andNetworking Engineering; Engineering Design; Engineering Technology;and Environmental and Natural Science Engineering. To preparestudents for continued training, advanced educationalopportunities, and direct entry to a career, the engineering anddesign programs offer the following components: classroom,laboratory, and hands-on contextual learning; project- andwork-based instruction; internship, community classroom, andcooperative career technical education; work experience education;and leadership and interpersonal skills development.
FINBusiness and FinancePersons trained in such fields as accounting, banking, andfinance will find that their skills are highly marketable. Studentsmaster basic accounting principles and procedures before proceedingto the career path specializations. The specializations emphasizeconcepts of accounting and finance, including computerapplications, taxes, investments, and asset management. Becausealmost every business organization has an accounting component,students with knowledge of accounting will find that opportunitiesexist in many other career paths in addition to those in financeand business.
FSNFashion and Interior DesignThe Fashion and Interior Design sector contains two careerpathways: Fashion Design, Manufacturing, and Merchandising; andInterior Design, Furnishings, and Maintenance. To meet the growingneeds of this industry, the career pathways prepare students withthe knowledge, skills, and attitude necessary to pursue relatedcareers and succeed in entry-level positions or pursue additionalpostsecondary education and training for technical andprofessional-level positions. The pathways include introductorystandards for Consumer and Family Studies that lead to the otherpathway standards. The standards are designed to integrate academicconcepts with career technical concepts. Key components of thepathways support classroom and laboratory instruction or supervisedwork-based learning experiences and leadership development.
HLTHealth Science and Medical TechnologyThe standards in the Health Science and Medical Technologysector represent the academic and technical skills and knowledgestudents need to pursue a full range of career opportunities inthis sector, from entry level to management, including technicaland professional career specialties. The standards tell whatworkers need to know and be able to do to contribute to thedelivery of safe and effective health care. The career pathways aregrouped into functions that have a common purpose and requiresimilar attributes. The career pathways are Biotechnology Researchand Development, Diagnostic Services, Health Informatics, SupportServices, and Therapeutic Services. Standards for each career pathbuild on and continue the foundation standards with morecomplexity, rigor, and career specificity.
HOSHospitality, Tourism, and RecreationThe Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreation sector providesstudents with the academic and technical preparation to pursuehigh-demand and high-skill careers in these related and growingindustries. The sector encompasses three distinct, yetinterrelated, career pathways: Food Science, Dietetics, andNutrition; Food Service and Hospitality; and Hospitality, Tourism,and Recreation. The foundation standards include core,comprehensive technical knowledge and skills that prepare studentsfor learning in the pathways. The knowledge and skills are acquiredwithin a sequential, standards-based pathway program thatintegrates hands-on and project- and work-based instruction as wellas internship, community classroom, work experience,apprenticeship, and cooperative career technical education.Standards included in the Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreationsector are designed to prepare students for technical training,postsecondary education, and entry to a career.
INFInformation and Communication TechnologiesTechnology and the growing complexity of businesses haveexpanded the need for employees who can analyze, design, and manageinformation. Skills for evaluating data, the ability to work withpeople, and clear communication are companion components forcareers in information technology systems. Employment opportunitiesfor technically and professionally trained persons are outstandingin this emerging career path. After mastering basic technologyskills, students can select one of many specializations in thefield of technology.
MANManufacturing and Product DevelopmentThe Manufacturing and Product Development sector provides afoundation in manufacturing processes and systems, includingmachine tool, welding, graphic communications, and graphic design,for secondary students in California. Students engage in aninstructional program that integrates academic and technicalpreparation and focuses on career awareness, career exploration,and skill preparation in four pathways. The pathways emphasizereal-world, occupationally relevant experiences of significantscope and depth in manufacturing and in graphic communication. Theknowledge and skills are acquired within a sequential,standards-based pathway program that integrates hands-on,project-based, and work-based instruction as well as internship,community classroom, work experience, apprenticeship, andcooperative career technical education. Standards included in theManufacturing and Product Development sector are designed toprepare students for technical training, postsecondary education,and entry to a career.
MARMarketing, Sales, and ServiceThe Marketing, Sales, and Service sector is designed to aligncareer path course work with current and projected employmentopportunities. Marketing includes the processes and techniques oftransferring products or services to consumers and is a function ofalmost every business. It exists within an environment of rapidlychanging technology, interdependent nations and economies, andincreasing demands for ethical and social responsibility. The fourpathways in this sector -commerce, Entrepreneurship, InternationalTrade, and Professional Sales and Marketing emphasize training tomeet the growing need for marketing professionals with skills incommunication, global marketing, marketing strategies, product andservice management, promotion, and selling concepts. These pathwaysprovide a firm foundation for advanced education, entry to acareer, and success in the global marketplace.
NRGEnergy and UtilitiesThe Energy and Utilities sector is designed to provide afoundation in energy and utilities for all students in California.The pathways emphasize real-world, occupationally relevantexperiences of significant scope and depth in ElectromechanicalInstallation and Maintenance, Energy and Environmental Technology,Public Utilities, and Residential and Commercial Energy andUtilities. The standards integrate academic and technicalpreparation and focus on career awareness, career exploration, andskill preparation in four pathways. The following components areintegral to the Energy and Utilities sector pathways: classroom,laboratory, hands-on contextual learning, project and work-basedinstruction, internship, community classroom, cooperative careertechnical education, and leadership development. The Energy andUtilities sector standards prepare students for continued training,postsecondary education, or entry to a career.
PUBPublic ServicesThe Public Services sector provides a foundation for secondarystudents in government, public administration, public safety,legal, and human services. Students engage in an instructionalprogram that integrates academic and technical preparation andfocuses on career awareness, career exploration, and skillpreparation in the industry. The sector encompasses three careerpathways: Human Services, Legal and Government Services, andProtective Services. These pathways emphasize processes, systems,and services related to serving the public's interest. Theknowledge and skills are acquired within a sequential,standards-based pathway program that integrates classroom,laboratory, and project- and work-based instruction as well asinternship, community classroom, work experience, and cooperativecareer technical education. Standards included in the PublicServices sector are designed to prepare students for technicaltraining, postsecondary education, and entry to a career.
TRATransportationThe Transportation sector is designed to provide a foundationin transportation services for all industrial technology educationstudents in California. The pathways emphasize real-world,occupationally relevant experiences of significant scope and depthin Aviation and Aerospace Transportation Services, Collision Repairand Refinishing, and Vehicle Maintenance, Service, and Repair. Thestandards are designed to integrate academic and technicalpreparation and focus on career awareness, career exploration, andskill preparation in the three pathways. Integral componentsinclude classroom, laboratory, hands-on contextual learning, andproject- and work-based instruction as well as internship,community classroom, cooperative career technical education, andleadership development. The Transportation sector standards preparestudents for continued training, postsecondary education, and entryto a career.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
100Agricultural BusinessSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
101Agricultural MechanicsSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
102AgriscienceSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
103Animal ScienceSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
104Forestry and Natural ResourcesSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
105Ornamental HorticultureSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
106Plant and Soil ScienceSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
111Design, Visual, and Media ArtsSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
112Performing ArtsSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
113Production and Managerial ArtsSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
114Game Design and IntegrationSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
120Cabinetmaking, Millwork, and WoodworkingSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
121Engineering and Heavy ConstructionSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
122Mechanical Systems Installation and RepairSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
123Residential and Commercial ConstructionSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
130Child DevelopmentSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
131Consumer ServicesSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
132EducationSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
133Family and Human ServicesSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
140Electromechanical Installation and MaintenanceSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
141Environmental ResourcesSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
142TelecommunicationsSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
143Energy and Power TechnologySee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
150Architectural DesignSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
151Computer Hardware, Electrical, and Networking EngineeringSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
152Engineering DesignSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
153Engineering TechnologySee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
154Environmental EngineeringSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
160Fashion Design and MerchandisingSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
161Interior DesignSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
162Personal ServicesSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
170Information Support and ServicesSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
171Media Support and ServicesSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
172NetworkingSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
173Programming and Systems DevelopmentSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
174Software and Systems DevelopmentSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
175Games and SimulationsSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
180Financial ServicesSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
181International BusinessSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
182Business ManagementSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
190Biotechnology Research and DevelopmentSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
191Diagnostic ServicesSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
192Health InformaticsSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
193Support ServicesSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
194Therapeutic ServicesSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
195Mental and Behavioral HealthSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
196BiotechnologySee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
197Healthcare Operational SupportSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
198Patient CareSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
199Public and Community HealthSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
200Food Science, Dietetics, and NutritionSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
201Food Service and HospitalitySee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
202Hospitality, Tourism, and RecreationSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
210Graphic Production TechnologiesSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
211Integrated Graphics TechnologySee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
212Machining and Forming TechnologiesSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
213Welding and Materials JoiningSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
214Introductory/CoreSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
215Emerging Technologies in Manufacturing and Product DevelopmentSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
216Product Innovation and DesignSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
220Structural Repair and RefinishingSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
221Systems Diagnostics, Services, and RepairSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
222Aviation and Aerospace Transportation ServicesSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
223OperationsSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
230Human ServicesSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
231Legal PracticesSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
232Public SafetySee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
233Emergency ResponseSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
240E-CommerceSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
241Entrepreneurship/Self-EmploymentSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
242International TradeSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
243Professional SalesSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
244MarketingSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
250Healthcare Administrative ServicesSee Resources tab for link to Career Technical Education (CTE) Standards.
999Multiple PathwaysA coded value representing an association with multiple CTE Pathways within or across industry sectors.

NOTE These two codes will remain in effect as we transition to the ELPAC.

Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
1Initial IdentificationThe first time a student with a primary language that is notEnglish has been assessed with the CELDT for English learneridentification purposes.
2Annual AssessmentAn annual assessment of the CELDT to a English learner to helpgauge their English language acquisition.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
AHistory/Social ScienceThe course meets UC/CSU requirements for History/SocialScience.
BEnglishThe course meets UC/CSU requirements for English.
CMathematicsThe course meets UC/CSU requirements for Mathematics.
DLaboratory ScienceThe course meets UC/CSU requirements for LaboratoryScience.
ELanguage other than English (i.e., foreign languages andAmerican Sign Language)The course meets UC/CSU requirements for a Language other thanEnglish.
FVisual and Performing ArtsThe course meets UC/CSU requirements for Visual and PerformingArts.
GAHistory/Social Science ElectiveA preparatory elective in History/Social Science.
GBEnglish ElectiveA preparatory elective in English.
GCMathematics ElectiveA preparatory elective in Mathmatics.
GDLaboratory Science ElectiveA preparatory elective in Science.
GEForeign Language ElectiveA preparatory elective in a Foreign Language.
GFVisual and Performing Arts ElectiveA preparatory elective in Visual and Performing Arts.
GOOther ElectiveA preparatory elective in any other subject area.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
100Agricultural Businesshttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/agnatural.pdf
101Agricultural Mechanicshttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/agnatural.pdf
102Agrisciencehttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/agnatural.pdf
103Animal Sciencehttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/agnatural.pdf
104Forestry and Natural Resourceshttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/agnatural.pdf
105Ornamental Horticulturehttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/agnatural.pdf
106Plant and Soil Sciencehttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/agnatural.pdf
111Design, Visual, and Media Artshttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/artsmedia.pdf
112Performing Artshttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/artsmedia.pdf
113Production and Managerial Artshttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/artsmedia.pdf
114Game Design and Integrationhttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/artsmedia.pdf
120Cabinetmaking, Millwork, and Woodworkinghttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/buildingconstruct.pdf
121Engineering and Heavy Constructionhttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/buildingconstruct.pdf
122Mechanical Systems Installation and Repairhttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/buildingconstruct.pdf
123Residential and Commercial Constructionhttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/buildingconstruct.pdf
130Education, Child Development, and Family Serviceshttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/edchildfamily.pdf
131Consumer Serviceshttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/edchildfamily.pdf
132Education Pathwayhttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/edchildfamily.pdf
133Family and Human Serviceshttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/edchildfamily.pdf
140Electromechanical Installation and MaintenanceSee the CTE Standards All Industry Sectors document,located at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/ctemcstandards.asp.
141Environmental Resourceshttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/energyutilities.pdf
142Telecommunicationshttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/energyutilities.pdf
143Energy and Power Technologyhttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/energyutilities.pdf
150Architectural Designhttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/enginearchit.pdf
151Computer Hardware, Electrical, and Networking Engineeringhttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/enginearchit.pdf
152Engineering Designhttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/enginearchit.pdf
153Engineering Technologyhttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/enginearchit.pdf
154Environmental Engineeringhttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/enginearchit.pdf
160Fashion Design and Merchandisinghttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/fashioninterior.pdf
161Interior Designhttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/fashioninterior.pdf
162Personal Serviceshttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/fashioninterior.pdf
170Information Support and Serviceshttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/infocomtech.pdf
171Media Support and Serviceshttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/infocomtech.pdf
172Networkinghttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/infocomtech.pdf
173Programming and Systems Developmenthttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/infocomtech.pdf
174Software and Systems Developmenthttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/infocomtech.pdf
175Games and Simulationshttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/infocomtech.pdf
180Financial Serviceshttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/bizfinance.pdf
181International Businesshttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/bizfinance.pdf
182Business Managementhttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/bizfinance.pdf
190Biotechnology Research and Developmenthttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/healthmedical.pdf
191Diagnostic Serviceshttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/healthmedical.pdf
192Health Informaticshttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/healthmedical.pdf
193Support Serviceshttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/healthmedical.pdf
194Therapeutic Serviceshttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/healthmedical.pdf
195Mental and Behavioral Healthhttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/healthmedical.pdf
196Biotechnologyhttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/healthmedical.pdf
197Healthcare Operational Supporthttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/healthmedical.pdf
198Patient Carehttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/healthmedical.pdf
199Public and Community Healthhttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/healthmedical.pdf
200Food Science, Dietetics, and Nutritionhttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/hosptourrec.pdf
201Food Service and Hospitalityhttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/hosptourrec.pdf
202Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreationhttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/hosptourrec.pdf
210Graphic Production Technologieshttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/manproddev.pdf
211Integrated Graphics Technologyhttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/manproddev.pdf
212Machining and Forming Technologieshttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/manproddev.pdf
213Welding and Materials JoiningSee the CTE Standards – All Industry Sectors document,located at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/ctemcstandards.asp.
214Introductory/CoreSee the CTE Standards – All Industry Sectors document,located at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/ctemcstandards.asp.
215Emerging Technologies in Manufacturing and ProductDevelopmentSee the CTE Standards – All Industry Sectors document,located at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/ctemcstandards.asp.
216Product Innovation and DesignSee the CTE Standards – All Industry Sectors document,located at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/ctemcstandards.asp.
220Structural Repair and Refinishinghttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/transportation.pdf
221Systems Diagnostics, Services, and Repairhttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/transportation.pdf
222Aviation and Aerospace Transportation ServicesSee the CTE Standards – All Industry Sectors document,located at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/ctemcstandards.asp.
223Operationshttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/transportation.pdf
230Human ServicesSee the CTE Standards – All Industry Sectors document,located at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/ctemcstandards.asp.
231Legal Practiceshttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/pubservices.pdf
232Public Safetyhttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/pubservices.pdf
233Emergency Responsehttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/pubservices.pdf
240E-CommerceSee the CTE Standards – All Industry Sectors document,located at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/ctemcstandards.asp.
241Entrepreneurship/Self-Employmenthttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/mktsalesservices.pdf
242International TradeSee the CTE Standards – All Industry Sectors document,located at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/ctemcstandards.asp.
243Professional Saleshttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/mktsalesservices.pdf
244Marketinghttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/mktsalesservices.pdf
250Healthcare Administrative ServicesSee the CTE Standards – All Industry Sectors document,located at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/ctemcstandards.asp.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
AExam OptionAn educator has demonstrated subject matter competence on the basis of passing a Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC)-approved examination in the NCLB core academic subject area
BCourseworkAn educator has demonstrated subject matter competence by completion of a Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) approved subject matter program, has obtained a subject matter program waiver (secondary level only), completion of a major equivalent (32 non-remedial semester units in a particular discipline from an accredited institution of higher education), or a graduate degree in the NCLB core academic subject area.
CNational Board CertificationAn educator has demonstrated subject matter competence by obtaining National Board Certification in the NCLB core academic subject area.
DHOUSSEAn educator has demonstrated subject matter competence by completion of the California High Objective Uniform State Standard of Evaluation (HOUSSE), which consists of an assessment of qualifications and experience.
EHOUSSE Option 2An educator has demonstrated subject matter competence through HOUSSE Part II, which is an assessment of current qualifications through classroom observation or portfolio development.
FHOUSSE Option 3An educator has demonstrated subject matter competence by completion of the California HOUSSE Part 1 and Part 2.
GVPSS OptionAn educator teaching in a special setting has demonstrated subject matter competence in mathematics, science, social science, and/or English through the Verification Process for Special Settings (VPSS).
NNot Highly QualifiedAn educator has not met the criteria to be designated as highly qualified to teach one or more NCLB core content areas.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
ACASCENSION ISLANDASCENSION ISLAND
ADANDORRAANDORRA
AEUNITED ARAB EMIRATESUNITED ARAB EMIRATES
AFAFGHANISTANAFGHANISTAN
AGANTIGUA AND BARBUDAANTIGUA AND BARBUDA
AIANGUILLAANGUILLA
ALALBANIAALBANIA
AMARMENIAARMENIA
ANNETHERLANDS ANTILLESNETHERLANDS ANTILLES
AOANGOLAANGOLA
AQANTARCTICAANTARCTICA
ARARGENTINAARGENTINA
ASAMERICAN SAMOAAMERICAN SAMOA
ATAUSTRIAAUSTRIA
AUAUSTRALIAAUSTRALIA
AWARUBAARUBA
AXÅLAND ISLANDSÅ+E238LAND ISLANDS
AZAZERBAIJANAZERBAIJAN
BABOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINABOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA
BBBARBADOSBARBADOS
BDBANGLADESHBANGLADESH
BEBELGIUMBELGIUM
BFBURKINA FASOBURKINA FASO
BGBULGARIABULGARIA
BHBAHRAINBAHRAIN
BIBURUNDIBURUNDI
BJBENINBENIN
BLSAINT BARTHELEMYSAINT BARTHELEMY
BMBERMUDABERMUDA
BNBRUNEI DARUSSALAMBRUNEI DARUSSALAM
BOBOLIVIA, PLURINATIONAL
STATE OF
BOLIVIA, PLURINATIONALSTATE OF
BQBONAIRE, SINT EUSTATIUS AND SABABONAIRE, SINT EUSTATIUS AND SABA
BRBRAZILBRAZIL
BSBAHAMASBAHAMAS
BTBHUTANBHUTAN
BUBurmaBurma
BVBOUVET ISLANDBOUVET ISLAND
BWBOTSWANABOTSWANA
BYBELARUSBELARUS
BZBELIZEBELIZE
CACANADACANADA
CCCOCOS (KEELING) ISLANDSCOCOS (KEELING) ISLANDS
CDCONGO, THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THECONGO, THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE
CFCENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLICCENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC
CGCONGOCONGO
CHSWITZERLANDSWITZERLAND
CICÔTE D'IVOIRECÔTE D'IVOIRE
CKCOOK ISLANDSCOOK ISLANDS
CLCHILECHILE
CMCAMEROONCAMEROON
CNCHINACHINA
COCOLOMBIACOLOMBIA
CPCLIPPERTON ISLANDCLIPPERTON ISLAND
CQCzechoslovakiaCzechoslovakia
CRCOSTA RICACOSTA RICA
CSSERBIA AND MONTENEGROSERBIA AND MONTENEGRO
CUCUBACUBA
CVCAPE VERDECAPE VERDE
CWCURAÇAOCURAÇAO
CXCHRISTMAS ISLANDCHRISTMAS ISLAND
CYCYPRUSCYPRUS
CZCZECH REPUBLICCZECH REPUBLIC
DEGERMANYGERMANY
DGDIEGO GARCIADIEGO GARCIA
DJDJIBOUTIDJIBOUTI
DKDENMARKDENMARK
DMDOMINICADOMINICA
DODOMINICAN REPUBLICDOMINICAN REPUBLIC
DZALGERIAALGERIA
ECECUADORECUADOR
EEESTONIAESTONIA
EGEGYPTEGYPT
EHWESTERN SAHARAWESTERN SAHARA
ERERITREAERITREA
ESSPAINSPAIN
ETETHIOPIAETHIOPIA
EUEUROPEAN UNIONEUROPEAN UNION
FIFINLANDFINLAND
FJFIJIFIJI
FKFALKLAND ISLANDS (MALVINAS)FALKLAND ISLANDS (MALVINAS)
FMMICRONESIA, FEDERATED STATES OFMICRONESIA, FEDERATED STATES OF
FOFAROE ISLANDSFAROE ISLANDS
FRFRANCEFRANCE
FXFRANCE, METROPOLITANFRANCE, METROPOLITAN
GAGABONGABON
GBUNITED KINGDOMUNITED KINGDOM
GDGRENADAGRENADA
GEGEORGIAGEORGIA
GFFRENCH GUIANAFRENCH GUIANA
GGGUERNSEYGUERNSEY
GHGHANAGHANA
GIGIBRALTARGIBRALTAR
GLGREENLANDGREENLAND
GMGAMBIAGAMBIA
GNGUINEAGUINEA
GPGUADELOUPEGUADELOUPE
GQEQUATORIAL GUINEAEQUATORIAL GUINEA
GRGREECEGREECE
GSSOUTH GEORGIA AND THE SOUTH SANDWICH ISLANDSSOUTH GEORGIA AND THE SOUTH SANDWICH ISLANDS
GTGUATEMALAGUATEMALA
GUGUAMGUAM
GWGUINEA-BISSAUGUINEA-BISSAU
GYGUYANAGUYANA
HKHONG KONGHONG KONG
HMHEARD ISLAND AND MCDONALD ISLANDSHEARD ISLAND AND MCDONALD ISLANDS
HNHONDURASHONDURAS
HRCROATIACROATIA
HTHAITIHAITI
HUHUNGARYHUNGARY
IDINDONESIAINDONESIA
IEIRELANDIRELAND
ILISRAELISRAEL
IMISLE OF MANISLE OF MAN
ININDIAINDIA
IOBRITISH INDIAN OCEAN TERRITORYBRITISH INDIAN OCEAN TERRITORY
IQIRAQIRAQ
IRIRAN, ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OFIRAN, ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF
ISICELANDICELAND
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JEJERSEYJERSEY
JMJAMAICAJAMAICA
JOJORDANJORDAN
JPJAPANJAPAN
KEKENYAKENYA
KGKYRGYZSTANKYRGYZSTAN
KHCAMBODIACAMBODIA
KIKIRIBATIKIRIBATI
KMCOMOROSCOMOROS
KNSAINT KITTS AND NEVISSAINT KITTS AND NEVIS
KPKOREA, DEMOCRATIC PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OFKOREA, DEMOCRATIC PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF
KRKOREA, REPUBLIC OFKOREA, REPUBLIC OF
KWKUWAITKUWAIT
KYCAYMAN ISLANDSCAYMAN ISLANDS
KZKAZAKHSTANKAZAKHSTAN
LALAO PEOPLE'S DEMOCRATIC REPUBLICLAO PEOPLE'S DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC
LBLEBANONLEBANON
LCSAINT LUCIASAINT LUCIA
LILIECHTENSTEINLIECHTENSTEIN
LKSRI LANKASRI LANKA
LRLIBERIALIBERIA
LSLESOTHOLESOTHO
LTLITHUANIALITHUANIA
LULUXEMBOURGLUXEMBOURG
LVLATVIALATVIA
LYLIBYAN ARAB JAMAHIRIYALIBYAN ARAB JAMAHIRIYA
MAMOROCCOMOROCCO
MCMONACOMONACO
MDMOLDOVA, REPUBLIC OFMOLDOVA, REPUBLIC OF
MEMONTENEGROMONTENEGRO
MFSAINT MARTINSAINT MARTIN
MGMADAGASCARMADAGASCAR
MHMARSHALL ISLANDSMARSHALL ISLANDS
MKMACEDONIA, THE FORMER YUGOSLAV REPUBLIC OFMACEDONIA, THE FORMER YUGOSLAV REPUBLIC OF
MLMALIMALI
MMMYANMARMYANMAR
MNMONGOLIAMONGOLIA
MOMACAOMACAO
MPNORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDSNORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS
MQMARTINIQUEMARTINIQUE
MRMAURITANIAMAURITANIA
MSMONTSERRATMONTSERRAT
MTMALTAMALTA
MUMAURITIUSMAURITIUS
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MWMALAWIMALAWI
MXMEXICOMEXICO
MYMALAYSIAMALAYSIA
MZMOZAMBIQUEMOZAMBIQUE
NANAMIBIANAMIBIA
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NENIGERNIGER
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NPNEPALNEPAL
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NUNIUENIUE
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PEPERUPERU
PFFRENCH POLYNESIAFRENCH POLYNESIA
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PHPHILIPPINESPHILIPPINES
PKPAKISTANPAKISTAN
PLPOLANDPOLAND
PMSAINT PIERRE AND MIQUELONSAINT PIERRE AND MIQUELON
PNPITCAIRNPITCAIRN
PRPUERTO RICOPUERTO RICO
PSPALESTINIAN TERRITORY, OCCUPIEDPALESTINIAN TERRITORY, OCCUPIED
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PWPALAUPALAU
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QAQATARQATAR
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ROROMANIAROMANIA
RSSERBIASERBIA
RURUSSIAN FEDERATIONRUSSIAN FEDERATION
RWRWANDARWANDA
SASAUDI ARABIASAUDI ARABIA
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SCSEYCHELLESSEYCHELLES
SDSUDANSUDAN
SESWEDENSWEDEN
SGSINGAPORESINGAPORE
SHSAINT HELENA, ASCENSION AND TRISTAN DA CUNHASAINT HELENA, ASCENSION AND TRISTAN DA CUNHA
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SJSVALBARD AND JAN MAYENSVALBARD AND JAN MAYEN
SKSLOVAKIASLOVAKIA
SLSIERRA LEONESIERRA LEONE
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SOSOMALIASOMALIA
SRSURINAMESURINAME
SSSOUTH SUDANSOUTH SUDAN
STSAO TOME AND PRINCIPESAO TOME AND PRINCIPE
SUUSSRUSSR
SVEL SALVADOREL SALVADOR
SYSYRIAN ARAB REPUBLICSYRIAN ARAB REPUBLIC
SZSWAZILANDSWAZILAND
TATRISTAN DA CUNHATRISTAN DA CUNHA
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TDCHADCHAD
TFFRENCH SOUTHERN TERRITORIESFRENCH SOUTHERN TERRITORIES
TGTOGOTOGO
THTHAILANDTHAILAND
TJTAJIKISTANTAJIKISTAN
TKTOKELAUTOKELAU
TLTIMOR-LESTETIMOR-LESTE
TMTURKMENISTANTURKMENISTAN
TNTUNISIATUNISIA
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TRTURKEYTURKEY
TTTRINIDAD AND TOBAGOTRINIDAD AND TOBAGO
TVTUVALUTUVALU
TWTAIWAN, PROVINCE OF CHINATAIWAN, PROVINCE OF CHINA
TZTANZANIA, UNITED REPUBLIC OFTANZANIA, UNITED REPUBLIC OF
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UGUGANDAUGANDA
UKUNITED KINGDOMUNITED KINGDOM
UMUNITED STATES MINOR OUTLYING ISLANDSUNITED STATES MINOR OUTLYING ISLANDS
USUNITED STATESUNITED STATES
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UZUZBEKISTANUZBEKISTAN
VAHOLY SEE (VATICAN CITY STATE)HOLY SEE (VATICAN CITY STATE)
VCSAINT VINCENT AND THE GRENADINESSAINT VINCENT AND THE GRENADINES
VEVENEZUELA, BOLIVARIAN
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VUVANUATUVANUATU
WFWALLIS AND FUTUNAWALLIS AND FUTUNA
WSSAMOASAMOA
YEYEMENYEMEN
YTMAYOTTEMAYOTTE
YUYUGOSLAVIAYUGOSLAVIA
ZASOUTH AFRICASOUTH AFRICA
ZMZAMBIAZAMBIA
ZRZAIREZAIRE
ZWZIMBABWEZIMBABWE
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
AGRI-01Agriculture - Agricultural managementThis course is offered to first year agriculture students to provide insight to the different pathways available in agriculture including their application to agriculture business. It has been designed to provide students with a unique perspective of agriculture and its impact on American Society.
AGRI-02Agriculture - Agricultural mechanics This course provides theory and hands-on experiences that provide opportunities for students to develop basic knowledge and skills in agricultural mechanics. Instructional areas include the basic fundamentals of maintaining and repairing small gasoline engines, basic electricity, welding, construction, cold metal work, and operating agricultural equipment safely.
AGRI-03Agriculture - Agricultural scienceThis course imparts information about the care and management of domestic and farm animals. These courses may cover animal nutrition, health, behavior, selection, reproduction, anatomy and physiology, facilities, product processing, and marketing. Students will be introduced to various species of large and small livestock or they may learn how to care for and maintain livestock as a more inclusive study.
AGRI-04Agriculture - Animal scienceThis course imparts information about the care and management of domestic and farm animals. These courses may cover animal nutrition, health, behavior, selection, reproduction, anatomy and physiology, facilities, product processing, and marketing. Students will be introduced to various species of large and small livestock or they may learn how to care for and maintain livestock as a more inclusive study.
AGRI-05Agriculture - ForestryThis course provides insight to the different careers and industry related to Forestry and Natural Resources. Courses will include a focus on the an understanding of the importance of forest ecology, recognizing species of trees and forest plants, tree and plant growth and development, forest and fire management, harvesting, timber stand improvement in both wild land and urban forests.
AGRI-06Agriculture - Horticulture and LandscapingThis course exposes students to the art and science of growing plants, shrubs, trees, flowers, fruits, and vegetables. They provide information regarding the care and propagation of plants, flowers, trees, and shrubs, but place a special emphasis on those used for decorative and aesthetic purposes. In doing so, they cover a wide variety of topics, including greenhouse and nursery operations, soils and media mixtures, fruit and vegetable production, turf/golf course management, interior and exterior plantscaping, irrigation systems, weed and pest control.
AGRI-07Agriculture - Plant scienceThis course provides knowledge about the propagation of plants for food and fiber. These courses may cover such topics as plant growth and health, irrigation, pest and weed control, food and fiber processing, and farm operations. They may also cover the knowledge and skills needed to produce all types of crops or may emphasize a particular area of the agricultural industry.
BUSN-01Business - AccountingBusiness - accounting course typically cover topics such as the bookkeeping cycle, debit/credit theory, financial statements, use of various journal and ledgers, worksheets, accounts receivable and payable, and payroll systems. Business-accounting courses present students with opportunities to learn how to keep financial records for a service or retail business.
BUSN-02Business - CommunicationsBusiness - Communication courses typically cover topics that allow students to learn about communication skills and current and upcoming technology and its impact personally and professionally. Business - Communications courses present students with opportunities to develop their competency the areas of oral and written communications, interpersonal skills and the use of current technology.
BUSN-03Business - Computer Concepts and ApplicationsBusiness - Computer Concepts and Applications typically cover topics such as computer concepts, word processing, spreadsheet, database and presentation software applications. Business - Computer Concepts and Applications present students with the opportunity to learn advanced principles associated with information processing.
BUSN-04Business - Consumer EducationBusiness - Consumer Education courses typically cover topics such as the economy, financial planning, banking, credit, insurance, housing, business law, investments and taxes. Business - Consumer Education courses present students with the opportunity to learn about their rights and responsibilities as consumers and know basics about taxes, investing, saving, credit and general banking.
BUSN-05Business - Data ProcessingBusiness - Data Processing courses typically cover topics such as the effective methods of processing data in a business atmosphere. Business - Data Processing present students with opportunities to operate specific hardware and software that is commonly used in businesses.
BUSN-06Business - EconomicsBusiness- Economics courses typically cover topics that focus on applying economic theory and analysis in business decision making. Business-Economics courses present students with an opportunity to understand the global economy and its connection to organizations, individuals and society.
BUSN-07Business - EnglishBusiness- English courses typically cover topics such as an introduction to Business English (punctuation, grammar, spelling, vocabulary, and use of reference tools); reading, speech, listening, and writing enrichment; employment (opportunities, letters of application, resumes, application forms, and interviews); and culminating activities. Business- English courses provide students with the opportunity to develop communication tools that can lead to success in the business world.
BUSN-08Business - EntrepreneurshipBusiness-Entrepreneurship course typically cover topics such as small business operations, marketing, human resources, accounting, business law and other related areas to business ownership. Business -Entrepreneurship course present students with the opportunity to learn about the characteristics of entrepreneurs and to make them aware that owning and operating their own business is a realistic career option.
BUSN-09Business - FinanceBusiness-Finance courses typically cover topics such as the fundamental principles, tools, and techniques of the financial operation involved in the management of business enterprises as well as making investments and personal finance. Business-Finance courses present students with the opportunity to learn about the basic framework and tools for financial analysis and financial planning and control, and introduces basic concepts and principles needed in making investment and financing decisions.
BUSN-10Business - Keyboarding and Word ProcessingBusiness - Keyboarding and Word Processing courses typically cover topics such as hands-on keyboarding as well as basic use of various types of word processing software. Business - Keyboarding and Word Processing courses present students with the opportunity to build the basic skills necesary to operate a computer keyboard and to create and edit basic documents.
BUSN-11Business - LawBusiness - Law courses typically cover topics related to legal regulations to which businesses are subject, contract law, partnership and corporate law, employment and labor law, intellectual property law, environmental regulation and sustainability, and financial regulation. Business - Law courses present students with the opportunity to examine the formulation, interpretation, and application of law to business. It incorporates the study of ethical issues that arise in contemporary business settings, including professional conduct and corporate social responsibility.
BUSN-12Business - ManagementBusiness - Management courses typically cover topics that allow students to investigate how organizations think and work, how they’re managed, and the external world in which they operate.
BUSN-13Business - MarketingBusiness - Marketing courses typically cover topics that allow students to develop their ability to apply and evaluate marketing theories and techniques. Business - Marketing course present students with the opportunity to explore and analyze the interdisciplinary nature of business management, and the role of marketing management and management professionals in organizations and society.
BUSN-14Business - MathematicsBusiness - Mathematics courses typically cover topics such as percentages, checking accounts and services, payroll, payroll taxes, cash and trade discounts, markdowns, property and sales taxes, simple and compound interest, installment purchases, loan payment plans, and annuities. Business - Mathematics courses present students with the opportunity to explore the development and application of the mathematical skills needed to solve problems related to business occupations.
BUSN-15Business - Office OccupationsBusiness- Office Occupations course typically cover topics that prepare students for occupations related to the facilitating functions of the office -- such functions include a variety of activities such as recording and retrieval of data, supervision and coordination of office activities, internal and external communication, and the reporting of information.
BUSN-NABusiness - Multiple or Not ApplicableThe Business course is associated with mutiple or has no specific Course Content Subcategory.
DANC-01Dance - BalletDance-Ballet courses typically cover topics that provide student with experience in the dance form of ballet. Dance-Ballet courses present students with the opportunity to improve their techniques and may offer or require choreographic and evaluation experiences.
DANC-02Dance - Composition and ProductionDance - Composition and Production course typically cover topics that allow students to study both historical and contemporary dance production from a multicultural perspective. Dance - Composition and Production courses present students with the opportunity to learn and apply genre-specific technique and choreographic principles to create fully developed choreography for formal and informal production. Students create and perform ensemble work for live audiences, and learn about all aspects of production from the dancer’s perspective including stage design, costuming, and lighting
DANC-03Dance - Folk/TraditionalDance - Folk/Traditional courses typically cover topics such as technique, customs and traditions including costumes, social context, terminology, and development over time. Dance - Folk/Traditional provide students with the opportunity to explore authentic folk and social dances from various regions, focusing on historical and cultural context and form. Advanced courses may focus on one traditional genre such as Folklorico or Kuchipudi.
DANC-04Dance - Hip HopDance - Hip Hop courses typically cover topics that provide students with experience in the hip hop dance form. Dance - Hip Hop courses present students with an opportunity to improve techniques and may offer or require choreographic and evaluation experiences.
DANC-05Dance - Independent or StudioDance - Independent or Studio course typically cover topics that allow students to receive advanced training in one or more dance genres including Jazz, Modern, Ballet, Hip-hop, Tap and/or culturally-specific folk and social dance forms. Dance - Independent or Studio present students with opportunities to demonstrate their knowledge of genre-specific technique, dance history and repertory through research, presentation and performance.
DANC-06Dance - JazzDance - Jazz course typically cover topics that provides students with experience in the dance form of jazz. Dance - Jazz course present students with the opportunity to improve their techniques and may offer or require choreographic and evaluation experiences.
DANC-07Dance - ModernDance - Modern course typically cover topics that provide students with experience in modern dance form. Dance - Modern courses present students with the opportunity to improve their techniques and may offer or require choreographic and evaluation experiences.
DANC-08Dance - TapDance-Tap courses typically cover topics that provide students with experience in the dance form of tap. Dance-Tap courses present students with the opportunity to improve their techniques and may offer or require choreographic and evaluation experiences.
DANC-09Dance - WorldDance - World course typically cover topics that provide students with experience in world dance form. Dance- World courses present students with the opportunity to improve their techniques and may offer or require choreographic and evaluation experiences.
DANC-NADance - Multiple or Not ApplicableThe Dance course has multiple or no specific Course Content Subcategory
HUMN-01Humanities - Art EmphasisHumanities courses typically cover the study of beliefs, thoughts, and traditions of humankind as reflected in history, philosophy, religion, dance, music, theater, and the visual arts. Humanities courses present students with the opportunity to develop an understanding of the connection among the arts and their historical and cultural context. This course has an Art emphasis.
HUMN-02Humanities - English EmphasisHumanities courses typically cover the study of beliefs, thoughts, and traditions of humankind as reflected in history, philosophy, religion, dance, music, theater, and the visual arts. Humanities courses present students with the opportunity to develop an understanding of the connection among the arts and their historical and cultural context. This course has an English Language Arts emphasis.
HUMN-03Humanities - History-Social Science EmphasisHumanities courses typically cover the study of beliefs, thoughts, and traditions of humankind as reflected in history, philosophy, religion, dance, music, theater, and the visual arts. Humanities courses present students with the opportunity to develop an understanding of the connection among the arts and their historical and cultural context. This course has a History Social Science emphasis.
LANG-00EnglishEnglish
LANG-01SpanishSpanish
LANG-02VietnameseVietnamese
LANG-03CantoneseCantonese
LANG-04KoreanKorean
LANG-05Filipino (Pilipino or Tagalog)Filipino (Pilipino or Tagalog)
LANG-06PortuguesePortuguese
LANG-07Mandarin (Putonghua)Mandarin (Putonghua)
LANG-08JapaneseJapanese
LANG-09Khmer (Cambodian)Khmer (Cambodian)
LANG-10LaoLao
LANG-11ArabicArabic
LANG-12ArmenianArmenian
LANG-13BurmeseBurmese
LANG-15DutchDutch
LANG-16Farsi (Persian)Farsi (Persian)
LANG-17FrenchFrench
LANG-18GermanGerman
LANG-19GreekGreek
LANG-20Chamorro (Guamanian)Chamorro (Guamanian)
LANG-21HebrewHebrew
LANG-22HindiHindi
LANG-23HmongHmong
LANG-24HungarianHungarian
LANG-25IlocanoIlocano
LANG-26IndonesianIndonesian
LANG-27ItalianItalian
LANG-28PunjabiPunjabi
LANG-29RussianRussian
LANG-30SamoanSamoan
LANG-32ThaiThai
LANG-33TurkishTurkish
LANG-34TonganTongan
LANG-35UrduUrdu
LANG-36Cebuano (Visayan)Cebuano (Visayan)
LANG-37Sign LanguageSign Language
LANG-38UkrainianUkrainian
LANG-39Chaozhou (Chiuchow)Chaozhou (Chiuchow)
LANG-40PashtoPashto
LANG-41PolishPolish
LANG-42AssyrianAssyrian
LANG-43GujaratiGujarati
LANG-44Mien (Yao)Mien (Yao)
LANG-45RumanianRumanian
LANG-46TaiwaneseTaiwanese
LANG-47LahuLahu
LANG-48MarshalleseMarshallese
LANG-49MixtecoMixteco
LANG-50KhmuKhmu
LANG-51Kurdish (Kurdi, Kurmanji)Kurdish (Kurdi, Kurmanji)
LANG-52Serbo-Croatian (Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian)Serbo-Croatian (Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian)
LANG-53ToishaneseToishanese
LANG-54ChaldeanChaldean
LANG-56AlbanianAlbanian
LANG-57TigrinyaTigrinya
LANG-60SomaliSomali
LANG-61BengaliBengali
LANG-62TeluguTelugu
LANG-63TamilTamil
LANG-64MarathiMarathi
LANG-65KannadaKannada
LANG-66AmharicAmharic
LANG-67Bulgarian Bulgarian
LANG-68Kikuyu (Gikuyu)Kikuyu (Gikuyu)
LANG-69KashmiriKashmiri
LANG-70Swedish Swedish
LANG-71Zapoteco Zapoteco
LANG-72UzbekUzbek
LANG-73Haitian (Haitian Creole)Haitian (Haitian Creole)
LANG-74Kachin (Jingpho)Kachin (Jingpho)
LANG-75Karen languagesKaren languages
LANG-76NepaliNepali
LANG-77SwahiliSwahili
LANG-78OromoOromo
LANG-79LingalaLingala
LANG-80KinyarwandaKinyarwanda
LANG-81DzongkhaDzongkha
LANG-82DinkaDinka
LANG-99Other non-English languagesOther non-English languages
MDAR-01Media Arts - IntroductionMedia Arts Elementary courses typically cover topics that allow students to follow sequential, developmentally appropriate instruction in the creative and conceptual aspects of designing media arts experiences and products, including techniques, genres and styles from various and combined mediums and forms, including moving image, sound, interactive, spatial and/or interactive design.
MDAR-02Media Arts - Digital ImagingMedia Arts - Digital Imaging courses typically cover topics designed to introduce students to the creative and conceptual aspects of designing and producing digital imagery, graphics and photography, including techniques, genres and styles from fine arts and commercial advertising, internet and multimedia, web design, industrial and virtual design.
MDAR-03Media Arts - Interactive DesignMedia Arts - Interactive Design courses typically cover topics designed to introduce students to the creative and conceptual aspects of designing and producing interactive media arts experiences, products and services, including reactive (sensory-based [touch, proximity, movement, etc.] devices) and interactive technologies, 3D video game animation, interface design, mobile device applications, web multimedia, social media based, augmented, and/or virtual reality.
MDAR-04Media Arts - Interactive Game DesignMedia Arts - Interactive Game Design courses typically cover topics that allow students to build on Media Arts foundational coursework, exploring creative and conceptual aspects of designing and producing interactive game experiences and products, including reactive (sensory-based [touch, proximity, movement, etc.]) devices and interactive technologies interface design, mobile device applications, web multimedia and/or virtual reality games.
MDAR-05Media Arts - Web DesignMedia Arts - Web Design courses typically cover topics that allow students to build on Media Arts foundational coursework, exploring creative and conceptual aspects of designing and producing interactive, multimedia web sites and experiences, products and services, including information architecture, graphic and interface design and web based multimedia.
MDAR-06Media Arts - Moving ImageMedia Arts – Moving Image courses typically cover topics that allow students to build on Media Arts foundational coursework, exploring creative and conceptual aspects of designing and producing moving images for the variety of cinematic, film/video and multimedia presentations including: fictional dramas, documentaries, music videos, artistic and experimental presentations and/or installations, interactive, immersive and performance media, etc.
MDAR-07Media Arts - Moving Image AnimationMedia Arts – Moving Image - Animation courses typically cover topics that allow students to build on Media Arts foundational coursework, exploring creative and conceptual aspects of designing and producing animated images for the variety of storytelling and multimedia presentations including: dramatic narratives, artistic and experimental presentations and/or installations, ambient, interactive, immersive and performance media, etc.
MDAR-08Media Arts - Digital Sound DesignMedia Arts – Digital Sound Design courses typically cover topics that allow students to build on Media Arts foundational coursework, exploring creative and conceptual aspects of designing and producing sound for the variety of multimedia and popular musical forms, including: artistic and experimental presentations and/or installations; soundtracks for moving image; interactive, immersive and performance media, etc.
MDAR-09Media Arts - Virtual DesignMedia Arts - Virtual Design courses typically cover topics that allow students to build on Media Arts foundational coursework, exploring creative and conceptual aspects of designing and producing simulative, virtual, 3D media arts experiences, products and services, including: environments, structures, objects, architecture and ecologies, virtual and augmented reality.
MDAR-10Media Arts - Multimedia DesignMedia Arts – Multimedia Design courses typically cover topics that allow students to build on Media Arts foundational coursework, exploring creative and conceptual aspects of designing and producing media arts experiences, products and services that combine imagery, text, sound, motion, interactivity and/or virtuality into a unified presentation.
MDAR-11Media Arts - Intermedia DesignMedia Arts – Intermedia Design courses typically cover topics that allow students to build on Media Arts foundational coursework, exploring creative and conceptual aspects of designing and producing inter-disciplinary media arts, intermedia and/or transmedia, that merges mediums in diverse combinations and emerging hybrids.
MDAR-12Media Arts - Media Arts TheoryMedia Arts - Media Arts Theory courses typically cover topics that allow students to explore the conceptual, social and philosophical aspects of the variety, purposes and nature of media arts.
MDAR-NAMedia Arts - Multiple or Not ApplicableThe Media Arts Course is associated with mutiple or has no specific Course Content Subcategory.
MUIN-01Music - Instrumental - BandMusic - Instrumental - Band courses typically cover topics in which students learn proper individual and band instrument technique, receive standards-based sequential music instruction. Music - Instrumental - Band courses present students with the opportunity to participate in a variety types of bands, that may include: guitar band, garage band, symphonic band, marching band, jazz band, swing bands, or stage bands. There may be more than one band group at the same time, within the course of instruction.
MUIN-02Music - Instrumental - GuitarMusic - Instrumental - Guitar courses typically cover topics that allow students to develop techniques for playing and performing on the guitar. Music - Instrumental - Guitar present students with the opportunity to develop critical analysis, and problem solving, collaboration, and musical skills and understandings are through rehearsal and performance experiences. Music - Instrumental - Guitar courses may be offered on multiple skill levels to accommodate student proficiency and may include, but are not limited to course titles such as: Guitar, Guitar Ensemble
MUIN-03Music - Instrumental - EnsembleMusic - Instrumental - Ensemble courses typically cover topics that allow students to develop techniques for playing in musical ensembles. Music - Instrumental - Ensemble courses provide students the opportunity to learn proper individual and ensemble instrument technique and receive standards-based sequential music instruction. It may include world music ensembles, percussion or drumming ensembles, recorder ensemble, jazz ensemble, swing ensemble, stage ensemble, or Mariachi. There may be several ensemble groups at the same time, within the course of instruction. Please note that if the instrumental ensemble is a guitar ensemble that there is a separate course code for Music - Instrumental - Guitar and those courses should be coded with that course content subcategory.
MUIN-04Music - Instrumental - Orchestra/SymphonyMusic - Instrumental - Orchestra/Symphony typically cover topics such as proper individual and ensemble instrumental techniques; the elements of music; orchestra music of different styles, cultures, and periods; is inclusive of music standards instruction learning. It provides demonstration of the learning; and includes utilization of the learning through performances. Music - Instrumental - Orchestra/Symphony present students with the opportunity to develop critical analysis, and problem solving, collaboration, and musical skills and understandings through rehearsal and performance experiences. Music - Instrumental - Orchestra/Symphony courses may be offered on multiple skill levels to accommodate student proficiency and may include, but are not limited to course titles such as: String Orchestra, Symphonic Orchestra.
MUIN-05Music - Instrumental - PianoMusic - Instrumental - Piano courses typically cover topics that allow students to develop techniques for playing and performing on the piano. Music - Instrumental - Piano present students with the opportunity to develop critical analysis, and problem solving, collaboration, and musical skills and understandings through rehearsal and performance experiences. Music - Instrumental - piano courses may be offered on multiple skill levels to accommodate student proficiency.
MUIN-06Music - Instrumental - Music Lessons Music - Instrumental - Piano courses typically cover topics that allow students to develop techniques for playing and performing on the piano. Music - Instrumental - Piano present students with the opportunity to develop critical analysis, and problem solving, collaboration, and musical skills and understandings through rehearsal and performance experiences. Music - Instrumental - piano courses may be offered on multiple skill levels to accommodate student proficiency.
MUIN-07Music - Instrumental - Marching BandMarching band courses typically cover topics such as tone production, technical skills, music reading skills, and music analysis. Marching band courses present students with the opportunity to participate in performances at school events as well as outside school performances and competitions.
MUIN-08Music - Instrumental - Color GuardColor guard courses typically cover topics such as movement and equipment basics, performance observation and analysis and basic design choreography. Color guard courses present students with the opportunity to build their understanding of music styles and learn performance techniques appropriate to various styles of music.
MUIN-NAMusic - Instrumental - Multiple or Not ApplicableThe Music - Instrumental - Piano course is associated with mutiple or has no specific Course Content Subcategory.
MUVO-01Music - Vocal - Choir/Chorus/Vocal Ensemble Music - Vocal - Choir/Chorus courses typically cover topics such as proper vocal choral, choir and ensemble techniques, the elements of music, and choral music of different styles, cultures, and periods; it may include principals of musical theatre and appropriate acting within the musical theatre arena. This course offers instruction inclusive of music standards and may include vocal jazz, show or swing choir, Broadway chorus or Blues, jazz choir, madrigal, chamber, vocal ensemble, world music choir/chorus, musical theatre choir, and others; it may provide demonstration of the learning; and includes utilization of the learning through performances. There may be several choral or ensemble groups at the same time, within the course of instruction.
MUVO-02Music - Vocal - Voice LessonsMusic - Vocal - Voice Lessons courses typically cover topics such as proper vocal techniques, the elements of music, and music of different styles, cultures, and periods. This course offers instruction inclusive of music standards and may provide demonstration of the learning; and includes utilization of the learning through performances.
MUVO-NAMusic - Vocal - Multiple or Not ApplicableThe Music - Vocal course is associated with mutiple or has no specific Course Content Subcategory.
PHYS-01Physical Education Elective - Adventure/Outdoor ActivitiesPhysical Education Elective - Adventure/Outdoor Activities courses typically cover content for developing skills and knowledge in adventure/outdoor activities (rock climbing, kayaking, etc.). Elective Physical Education courses present students with the opportunity to explore physical activities that they enjoy or show interest in. This course is designed for students who have completed High School Physical Education Courses I and II.
PHYS-02Physical Education Elective - Interscholastic AthleticsPhysical Education Elective - Interscholastic Athletics courses typically cover topics that allow students to develop advanced skills and knowledge for participation in school sponsored interscholastic athletic activities and teams. Physical Education Elective - Interscholastic Athletics courses are for students who have completed High School Physical Education Courses I and II.
PHYS-03Physical Education Elective - Weight Training and FitnessAn elective physical education course for students who have completed High School Physical Education Courses I and II, this course includes content for developing skills and knowledge in weight training and fitness.
PHYS-04Physical Education Elective - Aerobic ActivitiesPhysical Education Elective - Aerobic Activities course typically cover topics that allow students to develop skills and knowledge in aerobic activities (running, cycling, rowing, cross-country skiing, triathlon, swimming, skating, etc.). Physical Education Elective - Aerobic Activities is an elective physical education course for students who have completed High School Physical Education Courses I and II.
PHYS-05Physical Education Elective - Aquatic ActivitiesPhysical Education Elective - Aquatic Activities typically cover topics that allow students to develop skills and knowledge in aquatic activities (diving, snorkeling, life guarding, SCUBA, synchronized swimming, water polo, etc.). Physical Education Elective - Aquatic Activities is an elective physical education course for students who have completed High School Physical Education Courses I and II.
PHYS-06Physical Education Elective - DancePhysical Education Elective - Dance typically cover topics that allow students to develop skills and knowledge in dance (ballet, folk, jazz, modern, social, square). Physical Education Elective - Dance is an elective physical education course for students who have completed High School Physical Education Courses I and II. The content in this course is based on the physical education content standards.
PHYS-07Physical Education Elective - Individual and Dual ActivitiesPhysical Education Elective - Individual and Dual Activities typically cover topics that allow students to develop skills and knowledge in individual and dual activities (archery, golf, surfing, yoga, badminton, handball, squash, tennis, etc.). Physical Education Elective - Individual and Dual Activities is an elective physical education course for students who have completed High School Physical Education Courses I and II.
PHYS-NAPhysical Education Elective - Multiple or Not ApplicableThe Physical Education Elective - Individual and Dual Activities course is associated with mutiple or has no specific Course Content Subcategory.
STEM-01Applied STEM - AeronauticsApplied STEM - Aeronautics courses typically cover topics that allow students to explore aerospace through flight and space, including the science behind aeronautics. Applied STEM - Aeronautics courses present students with the opportunity to apply their knowledge to designing and building an aeronautics project.
STEM-02Applied STEM - Application DevelopmentApplied STEM - Application Development courses typically cover topics that allow students to use computer science to computationally analyze and develop solutions to authentic problems. Applied STEM - Application Development courses present students with the opportunity to apply computer science to other disciplines.
STEM-03Applied STEM - ArchitectureApplied STEM - Architecture courses typically cover topics that allow students to explore dimensioning, measuring, and architecture. Applied STEM - Architecture courses present students with the opportunity to apply their knowledge of the fields of architecture and construction.
STEM-04Applied STEM - Computer Science ApplicationsApplied STEM - Computer Science Applications courses typically cover topics that allow students to apply computer science in the physical world by blending hardware design and software development to discover computer science concepts and skills.
STEM-05Applied STEM - Design and ModelingApplied STEM - Design and Modeling courses typically cover topics that allow students to explore the design process with applied use in design and modeling.
STEM-06Applied STEM - Electricity and ElectronsApplied STEM - Electricity and Electrons courses typically cover topics that allow students to examine the behavior and parts of atoms as well as the impact of electricity on the world. Applied STEM - Electricity and Electrons courses present students with the opportunity to apply their skills in basic circuitry design.
STEM-07Applied STEM - Energy and the EnvironmentApplied STEM - Energy and the Environment typically cover topics that allow students to explore sustainable solutions to our energy needs including the impact of energy on our lives and the world. Applied STEM - Energy and the Environment courses present students with the opportunity to design and model alternative energy sources.
STEM-08Applied STEM - Medical ExplorationApplied STEM - Medical Exploration courses typically cover topics that allow students to explore medical science through hands-on projects and labs involving anatomy. Applied STEM - Medical Exploration courses present students with the opportunity to explore the application of medical science and a limited introductory exploration of medical careers.
STEM-09Applied STEM - RoboticsApplied STEM - Robotics courses typically cover topics that allow students to explore the automation and robotics which may include mechanical systems, energy transfer, machine automation, and/or computer control systems. Applied STEM- Robotics courses present students with an opportunity to apply the knowledge of automation and robotics.
STEM-10Applied STEM - TechnologyApplied STEM - Technology courses present students with the opportunity to explore the science of technology including applying the concepts of physics, chemistry and nanotechnology to activities and projects.
STEM-11Applied STEM - EngineeringIn development.
STEM-NAApplied STEM - Multiple or Not ApplicableThe Applied STEM course is associated with mutiple or has no specific Course Content Subcategory.
THTR-01Theatre - ActingTheatre - Acting courses typically cover topics such as the basic skills and techniques of acting, including increased sensory awareness, ensemble and solo performing, character analysis, and script analysis. Theatre - Acting present students with opportunities to develop stage presence and characterizations through improvisations and scenes.
THTR-02Theatre - DirectingTheatre - Directing course typically cover topics such as selecting and analyzing a script, developing an approach to the material, seeking inspiration, collaborating on the production, honing rehearsal skills, analysis and metaphor, casting, creating a design concept, working with actors, staging, and more. Theatre - Directing courses present students with the opportunity to study significant figures in the history of directing as well as various approaches and methods.
THTR-03Theatre - ImprovisationThis course is for the beginning improve student who desires to improve their spontaneity, creativity, and characterization skills. Students will learn the basics of improve as well as how the art form relates to other forms of theatre (traditional acting, stand-up, sketch, and invisible theatre).
THTR-04Theatre - Musical TheatreThis course provides students the opportunity to the refine and apply performance and production skills and knowledge, to development and performance of a theatrical musical. Students study how the artistic disciplines of music and dance can deepen or expand a theatrical work. Students work individually and collaboratively to develop musical and movement skills and integrate these skills into a scripted or devised theatrical production. Students also study the history and evolution of musical theatre genre, its literature, styles of composition, and performance conventions.
THTR-05Theatre - Performance and ProductionThis course provides students with the opportunity to build on fundamental performance and production skills by refining specific skills and techniques in on one or more areas of acting, directing, theatrical writing, and theatrical design. Students explore culturally diverse theatrical traditions in both solo and collaborative environments. Students respond critically to peer and professional work and explore personal performance styles and aesthetics.
THTR-06Theatre - PlaywritingTheatre - Playwriting course typically cover topics such as scene structure, action events, voice and dialogue by examining produced play scripts and creating original work. Theatre- Playwriting courses present students with the opportunity to explore the craft of writing for the theatre.
THTR-07Theatre - Technical Theatre/stagecraftTheatre - Technical Theatre/stagecraft courses typically cover topics such as lighting, set construction, sound production and reinforcement, costume and makeup design, stage management, and the use of computer applications that go into producing a theatre work. Theatre - Technical Theatre/stagecraft present students with opportunities to become proficient with the tools, safety regulations, stage etiquette and theatrical conventions that support the performance of a theatrical work. Students study these elements from a historical and contemporary perspective and learn the critique process.
THTR-08Theatre - Make-Up and Costume DesignMakeup and Costume Design courses typically cover topics that teach students the fundamentals of costume design and construction techniques along with stage makeup application and design. Makeup and Costume Design courses present students with the opportunity to study the history of the theater and fashion, learn about various careers available in the theater and analyze scripts with respect to designing for a production. In this class, students will learn basic sewing techniques, how to use colors and fabric, how to apply many types of stage makeup, how to take measurements and how to justify decisions made in the design process.
THTR-NATheatre - Multiple or Not ApplicableThe Theatre - Technical Theatre/stagecraft course is associated with mutiple or has no specific Course Content Subcategory.
VART-01Visual Art - Advertising design/Commercial ArtVisual Art - Advertising design/Commercial Art course typically cover topics that introduce students to the creative expression and design principles related to the field of advertising and commercial art. Visual Art - Advertising design/Commercial Art courses present students with the opportunity to have practical experiences in generating original ideas, executing layouts, and preparing artwork for reproduction.
VART-02Visual Art - CeramicsVisual Art - Ceramics courses typically cover topics such as clay modeling, hand building, coil building, casting and throwing on the potter's wheel. Visual Art - Ceramics courses present students with the opportunity to develop or extend their knowledge of ceramic techniques and develop a working knowledge of kiln firing and glazing techniques.
VART-03Visual Art - CraftsVisual Art - Crafts courses typically cover topics that provide students with experiences which emphasize original creative design and appropriate use of materials such as paper, fabric, fiber, clay, wood, plastics, plaster, and metal. Visual Art - Crafts courses present students with the opportunity to explore types of crafts and the materials and ways in which these objects have been created for the aesthetic, practical, religious, spiritual, and/or cultural needs of people around the world or within a specific region.
VART-04Visual Art - DesignVisual Art - Design course typically cover topics that provide students with experiences that develop their aesthetic and creative faculties in various visual art forms, offer training in awareness and criticism of art, and enable students to create quality works of art of their own. Visual Art - Design present students with opportunities to analyze and use design principles in works of art from art history and many world cultures.
VART-05Visual Art - Digital ArtVisual Art - Digital Art courses typically cover topics that allow students to explore the fundamental concepts, terminology, techniques, and applications of digital imaging to create original work. Visual Art - Digital Art courses present students with the opportunity to produce digital still images through the single or combined use of computers, digital cameras, scanners, photo editing software, drawing and painting software, graphic tablets, printers, new media, and emerging technologies.
VART-06Visual Art - DrawingVisual Art - Drawing courses typically cover topics such as the foundations in drawing using a variety of media and techniques in both black and white and color, the observation and interpretation of the visual environment, life drawing, and drawing from the imagination. Visual Art - Drawing courses present students with the opportunity to focus on making meaning by investigating and reflecting their awareness of their perceptions, knowledge, and experiences of life and develop their artistic styles.
VART-07Visual Art - Fashion designVisual Art - Fashion design courses typically cover topics such as the application of the elements and principles of the visual arts and design, a study of historical and contemporary visual arts as they relate to fashion design from a worldwide perspective, and instruction in the critique process. Visual Art - Fashion design courses present students with the opportunity to develop their skills drawing fashion figures and develop relationships of design to clothing.
VART-08Visual Art - Fiber and textile designVisual Art - Fiber and textile design courses typically cover topics that provide students with experiences which emphasize original, creative design using fiber and fiber-related techniques such as weaving, applique, and batik. Visual Art - Fiber and textile design courses present students with the opportunity to gain an understanding of the suitability of design to materials and intent as they create textile works of art following and breaking from traditional conventions.
VART-09Visual Art - Folk artVisual Art - Folk art courses typically cover topics that allow students to explore types of folk art and the materials and the ways in which objects have been created for the practical, religious, spiritual, and cultural needs of people around the world or to a specific locale or region. Visual Art - Folk art courses present students with the opportunity to address aesthetic issues surrounding folk art and artists and engage in critiques of the art of folk artists.
VART-10Visual Art - JewelryVisual Art - Jewelry courses typically cover topics that allow students to apply their previous art training in design to create individual pieces of jewelry. Visual Art - Jewelry present students with the opportunity to apply the elements of art and principles of design in creating jewelry and participate in critiques of their jewelry and metal works, the jewelry and metal works of other students, and those by professional jewelers and gemologists for the purpose of reflecting on and refining work for presentation.
VART-11Visual Art - Lettering/calligraphyVisual Art - Lettering/calligraphy course typically cover topics that allow students to explore various styles of inscribing letters, design developments by means of lettering, the romance of lettering through the ages, and the modern use of lettering in advertising, media, and art and design. Visual Art - Lettering/calligraphy present students with the opportunity to study historical and contemporary examples of calligraphy and typography and analyze artists who practice these art forms and the relationship to the context in which they were created and used.
VART-12Visual Art – Moving ImageVisual Art – Moving Image courses typically cover topics such as aesthetic meaning, appreciation and analysis of moving imagery; and all processes of development including: pre-production planning and organization, production and postproduction methods, tools and processes; moving image presentation, transmission, distribution and marketing; as well as contextual, cultural, and historical aspects and considerations. Visual Art – Moving Image courses present students with the opportunity to study the creative and conceptual aspects of designing and producing moving images for the variety of cinematic, film/video and multimedia presentations including: fictional dramas, documentaries, music videos, artistic and experimental presentations and/or installations, interactive, immersive and performance media, etc.
VART-13Visual Art - PaintingVisual Art - Painting courses typically cover topics such as the foundations in painting in a variety of media and techniques or may concentrate in one media such as watercolor, oil, painting, or acrylics. Visual Art - Painting present students with the opportunity to observe, interpret the visual environment, as well as draw from the imagination.
VART-14Visual Art - PhotographyVisual Art - Photography course typically cover topics that allow students to engage in learning opportunities in photography as a fine art in which students explore the use of the art elements and principles of design to communicate their ideas, feelings, or values through photographic work. Visual Art - Photography present students with opportunities to learn photographic techniques that may incorporate both traditional and contemporary (digital and multimedia technologies) traditions.
VART-15Visual Art - PrintmakingVisual Art - Printmaking typically cover topics that provide students with experiences in a variety of traditional and digital printmaking media, with an emphasis on creative visual expression of their thoughts, ideas, and values. Visual Art - Printmaking present students with opportunities to create realistic and abstract prints and communicate meaning by applying elements of art and principles of design and making cultural and historical connections.
VART-16Visual Art - SculptureVisual Art - Sculpture courses typically cover topics that allow students to explore representational and abstract sculpture through subtractive (carving), additive (modeling), and assemblage techniques in a variety of media such as wood, clay, plaster, plastics, metal, glass, glass fusion, wire, and found materials. Visual Art - Sculpture courses present students with the opportunity to produce representational and abstract sculptures that communicate personal ideas and messages through the application of the fundamentals of artistic expression while incorporating elements of art and principles of design.
VART-NAVisual Art - Multiple or Not ApplicableThe Visual Art - Sculpture course is associated with mutiple or has no specific Course Content Subcategory.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
1000Self-Contained ClassA class that provides instruction in multiple content areas andis delivered in one classroom to one group of students.
7000Exploratory Career Technical Education This code is used for courses that explore multiple industry sectors and/or pathways.  This course recruits students into a variety of sectors and/or pathways, allowing them to make a more confident decision about which one to pursue.  It is a pre-introductory class and the class does not contribute to the 300 hours requirement of a pathway.
7001Exploratory Family and Consumer Sciences (Grades 6-8)This course emphasizes the exploration of the Family and Consumer Sciences content areas, and related career opportunities. Instruction in grades six and seven targets self-development and management, relationships with others, and preparing for family, work, and community living. In grade eight, students study parenting and child development, personal and family relationships, making consumer decisions, personal image and clothing, healthy food choices, designing living environments and development of community, leadership through FCCLA, citizenship, and career roles.
7100Introduction to Agriculture and Natural ResourcesThis course typically will include content related to Earth Science in Agriculture or Agriculture Biology. Other Agriscience topics of an introductory nature are also appropriate.
7110Introduction to Agricultural BusinessThis course is offered to first year agriculture students to provide insight to the different pathways available in agriculture including their application to agriculture business. It has been designed to provide students with a unique perspective of agriculture and its impact on American Society.
7111Intermediate Agricultural Business (Concentrator)This course will include topics related but not limited to human relationships and effective communication, issue analysis, decision-making and problem-solving, leadership qualities and styles, and ensuring successful completion of group activities. The students then learn and enhance their written and oral communication skills by presenting their views and opinions to the class. Students learn how to arrange and present debates, speeches, and interviews to be effective leaders in today’s society.
7112Advanced Agricultural Business (Capstone)This course prepares individuals to perform tasks related to agribusiness, marketing, sales, agricultural economics, and management of farm and agriculturally related enterprises. It comprises the study of agribusiness-related careers, farm safety management, responsibilities of management, government organizations and regulations, basic microeconomics and macroeconomics, agricultural credit, record keeping and accounting, cash flow, introduction to taxes, marketing, history and current activities of agricultural cooperatives, purchasing, laws of significance to agriculture, and management decision aids.
7120Introduction to Agricultural Mechanics This course provides theory and hands-on experiences that provide opportunities for students to develop basic knowledge and skills in agricultural mechanics. Instructional areas include the basic fundamentals of maintaining and repairing small gasoline engines, basic electricity, welding, construction, cold metal work, and operating agricultural equipment safely.
7121Intermediate Agricultural Mechanics (Concentrator)This course in agriculture mechanics focuses on specialized skill development in welding, fabrication, equipment operation and repair.
7122Advanced Agricultural Mechanics (Capstone)This course may include advanced skill development in welding, fabrication, equipment operation and repair.
7130Introduction to AgriscienceThis course typically will include content related to Earth Science in Agriculture or Agriculture Biology. Other Agriscience topics of an introductory nature are also appropriate.
7131Intermediate Agriscience (Concentrator)This course will be the second in a sequence and require a prerequisite course. Similar topics as found with introductory courses and would include Agriculture Chemistry.
7132Advanced Agriscience (Capstone)This course will typically be the third course in a sequence. Courses might focus on Physics applied to agriculture.
7133Introduction to Sustainable AgricultureThis course number is intended for the content of the UCCI adopted course Biology and Sustainable Agriculture. Sustainability is based on a simple principle: Everything that we need for our survival and well-being depends, either directly or indirectly, on our environment. Sustainability creates and maintains the conditions under which humans and the biotic world can exist in productive harmony, that permit fulfilling the social, economic and other requirements of present and future generations.
7134Intermediate Sustainable Agriculture (Concentrator)This course number is intended for the content of the UCCI adopted course Chemistry and Agriscience. This course explores the physical and chemical nature of soil as well as the relationships between soil, plants, animals and agricultural practices. Students will examine properties of soil and land and their connections to plant and animal production.
7135Advanced Sustainable Agriculture (Capstone)This course number is intended for the content of the UCCI adopted course Advanced Interdisciplinary Science for Sustainable Agriculture. This integrated class combines an interdisciplinary approach to laboratory science and research with agricultural management principles. Using skills and principles learned in the course, students design systems and experiments to solve agricultural management issues currently facing the industry.
7140Introduction to Animal ScienceThis course imparts information about the care and management of domestic and farm animals. These courses may cover animal nutrition, health, behavior, selection, reproduction, anatomy and physiology, facilities, product processing, and marketing. Students will be introduced to various species of large and small livestock or they may learn how to care for and maintain livestock as a more inclusive study.
7141Intermediate Animal Science (Concentrator)This course focuses in a more specific area such as Small Animal Care, Large Animal Care, Aquaculture, Veterinary Science, Animal Anatomy, Animal Nutrition, Animal Reproduction, Dairy Science, Equine Science or other areas of animal agriculture.
7142Advanced Animal Science (Capstone)This course focuses in a specific area such as Small Animal Care, Large Animal Care, Aquaculture, Veterinary Science, Animal Anatomy, Animal Nutrition, Animal Reproduction, Dairy Science, Equine Science or other areas of animal agriculture. Additionally, capstone courses will address, marketing, sales, agricultural economics, cash flow and management of farms, ranches and animal agriculture related enterprises.
7150Introduction to Forestry and Natural ResourcesThis course provides insight to the different careers and industry related to Forestry and Natural Resources. Courses will include a focus on the an understanding of the importance of forest ecology, recognizing species of trees and forest plants, tree and plant growth and development, forest and fire management, harvesting, timber stand improvement in both wild land and urban forests.
7151Intermediate Forestry and Natural Resources (Concentrator)This course provides a more specific area of focus such as wildlife management, resource management, forestry and the development of management plans.
7152Advanced Forestry and Natural Resources (Capstone)This course provides a more specific area of focus such as wildlife management, resource management, forestry and the development of management plans. This will include marketing, sales, economics, cash flow and management of forest, wildlife and natural resource related enterprises.
7160Introduction to Ornamental HorticultureThis course exposes students to the art and science of growing plants, shrubs, trees, flowers, fruits, and vegetables. They provide information regarding the care and propagation of plants, flowers, trees, and shrubs, but place a special emphasis on those used for decorative and aesthetic purposes. In doing so, they cover a wide variety of topics, including greenhouse and nursery operations, soils and media mixtures, fruit and vegetable production, turf/golf course management, interior and exterior plantscaping, irrigation systems, weed and pest control.
7161Intermediate Ornamental Horticulture (Concentrator)This course addresses more specific areas of focus to include Landscape Design, Turf Grass propagation, Greenhouse and Nursery production.
7162Advanced Ornamental Horticulture (Capstone)This course expands on the areas of Landscape Design, Turf Grass propagation, Greenhouse and Nursery production. Additionally, the marketing, sales, economics, cash flow and management of landscape design, greenhouse, nursery and related enterprises.
7163Introduction to Floral DesignThis course focuses on the art applied to floral design, care and handling of cut flowers, and the mechanics of floral design.
7164Intermediate Floral Design (Concentrator)This course builds on the introductory course with increased focus on the art of design, handling of cut flowers and the mechanics of floral design while including the selection of quality flowers and greens, budgeting, retail pricing and presentation.
7165Advanced Floral Design (Capstone)This course builds on the concentrator course with the addition of marketing, sales, economics, cash flow and management of the retail and wholesale floral business. This will include how to prepare a bid for floral products and services for events.
7170Introduction to Plant ScienceThis course provides knowledge about the propagation of plants for food and fiber. These courses may cover such topics as plant growth and health, irrigation, pest and weed control, food and fiber processing, and farm operations. They may also cover the knowledge and skills needed to produce all types of crops or may emphasize a particular area of the agricultural industry.
7171Intermediate Plant Science (Concentrator)This course will focus on more specific areas of plant science such as soil science, viticulture, vegetables, grains, specialty crops. Irrigation and weed and pest control may also be addressed.
7172Advanced Plant Science (Capstone)This course will continue to focus on more specific areas such as soil science, viticulture, vegetables, grains specialty crops, irrigation, weed and pest control. Additionally, the marketing, sales, economics, cash flow and management of crops and related enterprises will be addressed.
7200Introduction to Arts, Media, and EntertainmentThis code is used for AME courses that are introductory to and include content for more than one pathway within the AME sector. This course recruits students into a variety of AME pathways, allowing them to make a more confident decision about which one to pursue.
7211Intermediate Graphic Design (Concentrator)This course provides students with an in depth experience with digital design tools, processes and systems common to careers in graphic arts and digital production. Career examination and skill building include printing enterprise, art and copy preparation, graphic design, image generation and assembly, production photography, graphic reproduction operations, binding and/or finishing related to digital imaging, printing, and digital production.
7212Advanced Graphic Design (Capstone)This capstone course provides students with an in depth understanding of digital design tools, processes and systems common to careers in graphic arts and digital production. Close examination of topics include printing enterprise, art and copy preparation, graphic design, image generation and assembly, production photography, graphic reproduction operations, binding and/or finishing related to digital imaging, printing, and digital production. This course serves as the Capstone course to Graphic Design.
7213Introduction to AnimationThis course introduces students to the artistic and technological foundations to create animated presentations for industry and entertainment. Students will develop basic drawing and design skills, learn the fundamentals and physics movement, the concept of communication to a given audience, and techniques for self-expression through a variety of animated formats. They will explore the careers and requisite skills required by animators in both entertainment and the business world.
7214Intermediate Animation (Concentrator)This course will build on foundational artistic and technical animation skills to prepare students for specific career paths in the Animation industry. Students will refine artistic skills and competencies and examine the variety of jobs in creating and producing within the professional animation industry. Students will explore the career options and opportunities in their particular career path.
7215Advanced Animation (Capstone)This capstone course will provide students with the opportunity to function in a variety of roles within the animation production team. Students will utilize skills acquired in introductory and concentration level animation courses to solve authentic industry problems and to produce a variety of professional quality animation products.
7216Introduction to Visual / Commercial ArtThis course provides an introduction to the commercial application of design principles to communicate on a two-dimensional plane. Students will create, manipulate, and analyze artistic elements and media used to express feelings and communicate ideas. Students will study the historical and cultural development of two-dimensional arts and its impact as a communications tool. Students will become familiar with current practices and applications including computer design and career focused traditional arts disciplines.
7217Intermediate Visual/Commercial Art(Concentrator)This course will emphasize the manipulation of artistic elements, media, and competencies in and beyond the two-dimensional plane. Students will use a variety of media to create industry relevant two and three-dimensional works that are personally and culturally expressive and industry relevant. courses will cover Client relations, the aesthetic and practical applications of design principles in art across disciplines, in architecture, fashion, and other creative industries.
7218Advanced Visual/Commercial Art (Capstone)This capstone course in the Visual/Commercial Art sequence applies learning from Introductory and Intermediate Visual /Commercial Art in a project based environment. Course work will focus on 2-D and 3-D artistic products and their application to an industry/commercial environment. Skills and knowledge will be demonstrated in both the educational and work based setting. Instruction will focus on applying student knowledge of drawing, painting, graphic design, photo, and 3 –D forms in industry environments. Students will create artistic products that demonstrate entry level workforce skills and comprehensive knowledge of industry practices.
7219Introduction to Media ArtsThis course will combine competencies in film, video, computer, and live production, as well as foundational knowledge in design to introduce students to a variety of jobs in the multimedia/communications/game design workforce. Instruction will focus on the interaction between media sources in live, recorded, and web-based productions. Students will develop skills in computer design, film and video production, lighting, sound, and projection design, and print media design. Students will also explore career options within this rapidly expanding industry sector.
7220Intermediate Media Arts (Concentrator)This course builds on competencies in film, video, computer, and live production design, as well as foundational knowledge in design. Coursework will focus on particular careers in the multimedia/communications /game design workforce. Instruction will focus on the interaction between media sources in live, recorded, and web-based productions. Coursework will deepen specific skills in computer design, film and video production, lighting, sound, and projection design, and print media design in preparation for a content specific Capstone course.
7221Advanced Media Arts (Capstone)This capstone course in the Media Arts sequence applies learning from Introductory and Intermediate Media Arts in a project based environment. Course work will focus on creative components film, video, computer, and live production application in both the educational and work based setting. Instruction will focus on applying student knowledge of visual art and design in computer and print media, film and video production, digital lighting sound and projection design, in industry environments. Students will create media arts products that demonstrate entry level workforce skills and comprehensive knowledge of industry practices.
7230Introduction to Dance / ChoreographyThis course explores the variety of career pathways available in dance. It introduces dance technique, choreography, . Students will explore the variety of dance genre (modern, jazz, ballet, tap, and contemporary). Students gain an appreciation of dance as an art form and develop the skills necessary to pursue a variety of careers in dance. The course includes application of the elements and principles of dance, study of historical and contemporary dance, and exploration of the art form from a careers perspective.
7231Intermediate Dance/Choreography (Concentrator)This course will refine dance and choreographic skills and introduce production elements (i.e., staging, lighting, and sound) and company organization and management in professional dance careers.
7232Advanced Dance / Choreography (Capstone)This course will apply dance and choreographic skills to create project based performances for live, film and video production. Students will prepare audition or choreographic portfolios, learn business/managerial skills, and develop a professional career plan.
7233Introduction to Professional MusicThis course explores the variety of career pathways available in Professional Music. It introduces performance technique, in a variety of musical genre including jazz, classical, modern and pop. Students will explore choral, solo performance, and ensemble music. Students gain an appreciation of music as an art form and develop the skills necessary to pursue a variety of careers in professional music. The course includes music theory and performance as well as the study of historical and contemporary music, with a focus on musical careers.
7234Intermediate Professional Music (Concentrator)This course will build on foundational music theory and technical knowledge to prepare students for specific career paths in music creation, performance, or production. Students will refine skills and competencies in their particular pathway of the professional music industry. Students will explore the career options and opportunities in their particular career path.
7235Advanced Professional Music (Capstone)This course will build on music theory and technical knowledge to prepare students for specific career paths in music creation, arrangement, and production. Students will explore music as an interpretive form of artistic expression and as a practical communications tool. Students will be trained to compose and appreciate music in a variety of genre. The historical and cultural context of composition will also be examined. The psychological impact on audience and market will be evaluated to maximize the effectiveness of a composition or arrangement. Students will explore the spectrum of career options ranging from artistic communication to entertainment to marketing and identify the effective use of musical composition in each pathway.
7236Introduction to Professional TheatreThis course introduces the variety of careers in professional theater. Students will study a range of professional models from Broadway to regional to community theatre to identify established practices and basic competencies required to create professional theatre.
7237Intermediate Professional Theatre (Concentrator)This course will build on the foundational skills in a variety of technical and performance disciplines to create project-based live performances in theatre and musical theatre. Students will explore portfolio preparation for live and film/video performance. Students will also be introduced to the business/managerial careers associated with live theatrical performance.
7238Advanced Professional Theatre (Capstone)This course will apply skills theatrical performance to create project based performances in theatre, musical theatre, film and video production. Students will prepare audition or direction portfolios, learn business/managerial skills, and develop a professional career plan.
7240Introduction to Stage TechnologyThis course introduces the techniques and processes involved in stage management, prop construction, lighting, the setup and operation of sound systems, and the operation of projection equipment. The program develops basic construction techniques for stage property and scenery; affords practice in stage crew work, which includes the erection and striking of scenery; and provides an overview of related occupations in radio and television.
7241Intermediate Stage Technology (Concentrator)This course will train students in the use and management of the various elements of technical production during a dance, music, or theatrical performance. These elements include the rigging and movement of sets, scenery, and lighting equipment, the use of computerized switching systems for lighting and sound, the management and distribution of stage properties, etc. Students will also be taught to manage the complex support tasks that are involved in a performance. They will explore apprenticeship, higher education options career training, and professional placement.
7242Advanced Stage Technology (Capstone)This course will build on foundation skills in Stage Technology and Production to include design in variety of theatrical productions. Students will use analytical skills to interpret literary material to create a design concept. Students will be familiar with design elements, drafting techniques, computer software, and modeling skills necessary to prepare designs and models of theatrical sets. They will be trained to interpret mechanical drawings to safely use appropriate power equipment to construct sets based on artist’s designs. They will also become familiar with the diverse array of production materials and techniques used to augment live theatrical productions.
7243Introduction to Film/Video ProductionThis course trains students to use film as a tool for communication and self-expression in entertainment and industry. Students will study the history and aesthetics of film as a complex, collaborative art form. They will explore the foundational elements of writing, photography, visual perception, and elements of design as they apply to cinematic expression. Students will analyze the use of film and video to share ideas and influence culture. They will also be trained in the multiple technical competencies required to communicate through film and the rich variety of employment opportunities available in the field.
7244Intermediate Film/Video Production (Concentrator)This course covers the history and development of the cinema, documentaries, and other new media and film technologies. Students learn skills and practices in various aspects of cinema and video production by applying the elements of art, principles of design, integration of technology for the effective visual communication of their ideas, feelings, and values. Students develop skills, including camera/recording operation, framing and composition, manipulations of space and time, idea development and communication, the mechanics and psychology of editing, script writing or text creation, light and sound, and impact.
7245Advanced Film/Video Production (Capstone)This course will examine specific uses of film and video technology in various entertainment and industry sectors. Students receive advanced training in pre and post production jobs and competencies, current and emerging technologies, and the collaborative nature of the creative process involved in video production. (Capstone)
7246Introduction to Multimedia ProductionThis course will provide foundational competencies in film, video, computer, and live production, as well as foundational knowledge in design to prepare students for employment in a variety of jobs in the multimedia/communications workforce. Instruction will focus on the interaction between media sources in live, recorded, and web-based productions. Students will develop skills in computer design, film and video production, lighting, sound, and projection design, and print media design.
7247Intermediate Multimedia Production (Concentrator)This course provides students skills and competencies in broadcast media including television, radio, web/pod casting, and emerging broadcasting technologies. Students will become familiar with current and emerging technology and practices and the variety of career opportunities that present themselves in the live broadcasting pathways (see Television Production and Radio Presentation for further information).
7248Advanced Multimedia Sound Production (Capstone)This course will allow students to examine the multiple uses of radio as a broadcast medium in various entertainment and industry sectors. They will receive task oriented training in pre, post, and “on air” production jobs and competencies, current and emerging technologies, and the collaborative nature of the creative process involved in radio production. In addition to “on air” performance techniques, students will examine the technological interface of sound, recording, audio switching, and computer modification involved in radio broadcast production.
7249Advanced Multimedia Film/Video Production (Capstone)This Capstone course for the Multi-Media Production pathway examines the specific uses of film and video technology in various creative industry applications. Students will demonstrate advanced knowledge and skills in pre-production, production, and post-production practices in an educational and work based environment. Students will create film, video and sound projects that demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of professional film, video and sound production.
7260Introduction to Game DesignThis course introduces students to the rapidly developing field game design and production. They will explore current technologies, media and art applications, and emerging technological advances that impact this ever expanding field. They will combine foundations in design, animation, graphic imaging, and multimedia production to prepare for employment, advanced training, or higher education in project or software design.
7261Intermediate Game Design (Concentrator)This course refines student skills and expands student knowledge in current technologies, media and art applications, and emerging technological advances that impact the game design field. Students will refine skills in design, animation, graphic imaging, coding and multimedia production to prepare for employment, advanced training, or higher education in project or software design. Students will explore other industry application including a mobile application design and technology.
7262Advanced Game Design (Capstone)This course will prepare students for entry level careers or continuing education in a particular area of game design. Students will use advanced skills to create collaborative projects, evaluate peer designs, and create a design portfolio and career plan.
7300Introduction to Building and Construction TradesThis course provides students with an overview of the building and construction trades sector, which emphasizes processes, systems, and the way in which structures are built. It also provides students with insight into the different pathways available within the sector and the different career opportunities associated with each pathway.
7310Introduction to Cabinetry, Millwork, and WoodworkingThis course introduces students to career opportunities within the sector and provides an overview of the planning, design, layout, and technical drawing interpretation for practical use in woodworking, cabinetmaking, and millworking. It may also cover different cabinet and furniture styles used, various wood products and materials, and proper tool selection. Students will be introduced to the different construction processes in the cabinetmaking, furniture making, and millworking industries.
7311Intermediate Cabinetry, Millwork, and Woodworking (Concentrator)This course will build on foundational skills attained in the introductory course(s). Students will gain competence in the planning, design, layout, and technical drawing interpretation for practical use in woodworking, cabinetmaking, and millworking. They may learn about: furniture and cabinet styles, wood products and materials, finishes, countertops, and the use of laminates and veneers. They will gain competence in various construction processes in the cabinetmaking, furniture making, and millworking industries. They will demonstrate proper techniques for furniture building as well as cabinet and countertop construction and installation.
7312Advanced Cabinetry, Millwork, and Woodworking (Capstone)This course allows students to demonstrate mastery in skills attained in concentrator courses. This may include demonstrating competency in the planning, construction, and installation of furniture, cabinets, countertops, and/or other millwork products. Students will demonstrate competence in the design, layout, and technical drawing interpretation for practical use in woodworking, cabinetmaking, and millworking. They will demonstrate mastery of various construction processes by building and/or installing furniture, cabinets, countertops, or any number of millwork products.
7320Introduction to Engineering and Heavy ConstructionThis course will introduce students to career opportunities within the sector and provide an overview of heavy industrial construction and the way in which roads, highways and subdivisions are built. Students will learn the basics of construction equipment, operation, and safety. They may also be introduced to soil properties, surveying and mapping, grading and drainage, water and wastewater systems, and masonry.
7321Intermediate Engineering and Heavy Construction (Concentrator)This course will build on foundational skills attained in the introductory course(s). Students will learn about soil properties, survey and mapping, grading and drainage, and water and wastewater systems. They will also learn about basic concrete maintenance and repair, and heavy equipment use, operation, and safety standards. Students may also learn about project management for heavy construction projects, internal and external impacts on the construction industry, and how to recognize building phases, systems, and techniques.
7322Advanced Engineering and Heavy Construction (Capstone)This capstone course allows students to demonstrate mastery in skills attained in concentrator courses. Student may demonstrate mastery by: interpreting soil reports, performing a survey or mapping, operating various heavy equipment in a safe manner, and/or mixing, pouring and finishing concrete. Students will demonstrate understanding of water and wastewater systems, the importance of safety rules and regulations, and knowledge of building codes and other applicable environmental laws and regulations as they relate to heavy construction projects. Students may also demonstrate understanding of project management procedures and processes as they relate to heavy construction projects.
7330Introduction to Mechanical Systems Installation and RepairThis course will introduce students to career opportunities within the sector and provide an overview of the theories and concepts of heating, ventilation, air-conditioning (HVAC), refrigeration, and appliance installation, maintenance, and repair. Students will be introduced to basic electricity and electrical control systems. The pathway includes preparation for a Class C California License and EPA certification.
7331Intermediate Mechanical Systems Installation and Repair (Concentrator)This course will build on foundational skills attained in the introductory course(s). Students will learn to install, operate, test, repair, and maintain commercial and domestic heating and air-conditioning systems. Students may also learn how to operate, maintain, and repair such building systems as plumbing, electrical, and other mechanical systems. Students will learn to fabricate tubing, piping, and fittings to industry standards, and troubleshoot electrical control systems, motors, and their components. Students will develop skills that prepare them for a Class C California License and EPA certification.
7332Advanced Mechanical Systems Installation and Repair (Capstone)This course allows students to demonstrate mastery in skills attained in concentrator courses. Students will: fabricate tubing, piping, and fittings to industry standards; service or repair heating and/or air-conditioning systems; and troubleshoot electrical control systems, motors, and their components. Students will demonstrate understanding of: basic electricity; the basic components and concepts of heating, air-conditioning, and refrigeration; methods and devices used to improve air quality, and scientific theories and properties of heat and matter. They may also demonstrate practical knowledge of combustion heating systems. Students may be prepared for a Class C California License and EPA certification.
7340Introduction to Residential and Commercial ConstructionThis course will introduce students to career opportunities within the sector and focuses on the manner in which residential and commercial structures are designed and built. The course covers construction and building design, performance, and sustainability, the study of safety, hand and power tools, planning and design, applicable mathematics, blueprint reading, trade nomenclature, residential and commercial construction standards, construction manufacturing standards, and other specialized skills. The pathway includes preparation for a Class B California License.
7341Intermediate Residential and Commercial Construction (Concentrator)This course will build on foundational skills attained in the introductory course(s). Students will learn the impact of financial, technical, environmental, and labor trends on the construction industry. They will gain competence in mathematical calculations that are used in the trades, and interpret technical drawings and schedules. The course will cover techniques for proper site preparation and foundation layout. Students will gain competence in carpentry skills that prepare them to lay out, fabricate, erect, install and repair wooden structures and fixtures. Topics covered may also be: framing, installing drywall and interior/exterior finishes, building walls and partitions, and installing roof systems, floors and floor coverings, and electrical wiring. Students will learn to integrate and employ sustainable construction practices, and may develop skills that prepare them for a Class B California License.
7342Advanced Residential and Commercial Construction (Capstone)This course allows students to demonstrate mastery in skills attained in concentrator courses. Students will apply appropriate mathematical calculations, interpret technical drawings, and demonstrate techniques for proper site preparation and foundation layout. They will demonstrate carpentry techniques for the construction of a single-family residence, proper installation techniques of internal and external materials and finishes, employ sustainable construction practices, and install plumbing and electrical systems that adhere to industry standards. Students may be prepared for a Class B California License.
7400Introduction to Business and FinanceThis course introduces students to key business concepts found in the Business Management, Financial Services, and International Business pathways. Students are introduced to the financial world and develop financial literacy through the study of income and wealth; financial institutions; how businesses raise capital; and study key investment-related terms and concepts. Students learn key concepts for managerial accounting, including manufacturing and cost accounting and budgeting. Students develop an understanding of how and why businesses choose to expand operations into other countries. Students examine careers in business, both as employees and as business owners.
7410Intermediate Business Management Communication Technologies (Concentrator)This course provides an in-depth, hands-on introduction to business technologies used for business communication. Topics include communication through digital documents, presentations, data computation and presentation, as well as how to represent themselves through digital media to society. This course applies the principles of ethical and effective communication in the creation of business letters, memos, emails, as well as written and oral reports for a variety of business situations. Concepts taught in this course will satisfy local computer literacy requirements and prepares individuals to create business correspondence, reports, publications, and forms by using computer operating systems; word processing; database, spreadsheet, and desktop publishing software; hardware and peripherals. Related topics in this course include human relationships and effective communication, issue analysis, decision-making and problem-solving, leadership qualities and styles, and ensuring successful teamwork.
7411Intermediate Business Management Technologies (Concentrator)This course provides a comprehensive overview of the technologies present in today’s business environment. Students are exposed to business practices that streamlines and promotes more effective operations. Students will understand how computer hardware and software are used to solve business problems and create business opportunities using entrepreneurship skills. Students will learn how the Internet was developed and how it is used today gaining an understanding of basic information technology protocols and the basics of connectivity in a global environment. Students will learn how to install and use common Web browsers and how to configure common browser preferences, including fonts, home pages, history, browser cache, image loading, bookmarks/favorites and security settings. Students will learn about Multimedia on the Web and how to install and upgrade common plug-ins, add-ons and applications. Students will understand the importance of computer security and understand how Virus, Worms, Trojans, Spyware, and illicit servers can affect computers and business networks.
7412Advanced Business Management Enterprise and Project Management (Capstone)This course prepares students to perform marketing and management functions and tasks associated with starting, owning, and operating a business. Students learn the principles and methods of organizing a business firm and for combining resources to produce goods and services, taking account of costs, profits, and the nature and extent of competition in markets. This course describes management functions and project management skills, project life cycle and project triangle as they are used to accomplish organizational goals. Program content addresses organizational theory; human resource development; management principles and styles; policy and strategy formation; production and operations management, planning and development; and economic theory and practice. Students are provided work-based learning opportunities and opportunities to obtain industry certification to demonstrate their mastery of career-ready skills.
7420Intermediate Financial Services and Banking (Concentrator)This course introduces students to the financial world through the study of income and wealth; financial institutions; how businesses raise capital; and study key investment-related terms and concepts. Students learn the history of how banking practices evolved and how businesses operate, grow, and thrive in our ever-changing world. This course includes principles on how to make good personal financial decisions and will cover major functions of financial institutions. Related topics in this course include modern trends in the finance industry, credit functions, loan creation, debt collection, and stocks and bonds. Students will learn the importance of integrity and professional ethics in business relationships; and the tools effective leaders use to instill an ethical workplace culture.
7421Intermediate Financial Services Management and Business Economics (Concentrator)This course discusses the economy and the factors that influence the success of businesses and products. Students will understand the roles of citizens, workers and consumers and the importance of planning, organizing, and controlling the monetary resources of a business. This course describes forms of business ownership, discusses the relationship of labor and business, and applies techniques for managing human resources to maximize operational efficiencies and effectiveness. Students will demonstrate characteristics of professionalism in working relationships with customers and employees. This Course integrates economic principals with entrepreneurship/business concepts.
7422Advanced Financial Services Business Accounting (Capstone)This course provides students with an understanding of how accounting processes are used to provide important financial information to internal and external stakeholders. Student apply the accounting cycle for both a service and merchandising business through closing the books for a sole proprietorship, partnership, and corporation; select and use appropriate computer hardware and software to develop, process, and maintain accounting records and create reports. Students complete accounting simulations and business case studies and analyze revenue streams and revenue forecasting. Related topics include: subsidiary ledgers, financial statements, asset acquisition and disposition, depreciation methods, flexible budgets, and capital budgeting decisions. Students are provided work-based learning through professional organizations like the American Institute of CPAs (certified public accountants) and earn industry certifications to demonstrate their mastery of career-ready skills.
7430Intermediate International Business (Concentrator)This course allows students to develop an understanding of how and why businesses choose to expand operations into other countries and develop the capacity and disposition to understand and act on business opportunities at the global level. This course will provide students with experiences to investigate the world and how it works, recognize that they have perspectives that others may or may not share. Students will develop the skill to compare and contrast perspectives and to integrate various viewpoints to construct a new one. Students will learn to effectively communicate, verbally and nonverbally, with wide-ranging audiences and collaborate on diverse international teams. Students will understand the fundamental concepts of international business and how to deploy modern technologies to conduct a business globally as an entrepreneur. Related topics in this course include the logistics of importing and exporting products and services, direct and indirect distribution channels, forms of international operations, and the role of information and communication technologies in modern global trade.
7431Intermediate International Business Communications (Concentrator)This course provides an in-depth, hands-on introduction to business technologies used for business communication. Topics include communication through digital documents, presentations, data computation and presentation, as well as how to represent themselves through digital media to society. This course applies the principles of ethical and effective communication in the creation of business letters, memos, emails, as well as written and oral reports for a variety of business situations. Concepts taught in this course will satisfy local computer literacy requirements and prepares individuals to create business correspondence, reports, publications, and forms by using computer operating systems; word processing; database, spreadsheet, and desktop publishing software; hardware and peripherals. Related topics in this course include human relationships and effective communication across cultures, issue analysis, decision-making and problem-solving, leadership qualities and styles, and ensuring successful teamwork.
7432Advanced International Business Enterprise (Capstone)This course prepares students to perform marketing and management functions and tasks associated with starting, owning, and operating an international business. Students learn the principles and methods of organizing a business firm and for combining resources to produce and import and export goods and services, taking account of costs, profits, and the nature and extent of competition in markets. This course describes management functions and project management skills, project life cycle and project triangle as they are used to accomplish organizational goals. Program content addresses organizational theory; human resource development; management principles and styles; policy and strategy formation; production and operations management, planning and development; and economic theory and practice. Students are provided work-based learning opportunities to work with international organizations and opportunities to obtain industry certification to demonstrate their mastery of career-ready skills.
7500Introduction to Education, Child Development, and Family ServicesThis introductory course for the Education, Child Development, and Family Services sector is the first in a sequence of courses that provides instruction in the eight content areas of Family and Consumer Sciences. The focus is on preparing students for personal and life management, and providing a strong foundation for Family and Consumer Sciences education related career paths. Instruction in the content areas of child development and guidance; consumer education; family and human development; education; fashion, textiles, and apparel; food and nutrition; housing and furnishings; individual and family health; and leadership is designed to prepare students with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to function effectively as family members, leaders, workers, and citizens.
7510Intermediate Child Development (Concentrator)This concentration course prepares students to understand children's physical, mental, emotional, and social growth and development, as well as provide for their care and guidance. Instruction includes prenatal developments; research theories in human growth and development from prenatal stages of development to puberty and beyond; inherited characteristics; health and safety; guidance and discipline; cultural diversity; child abuse and neglect; and children with special needs. This course provides a solid foundation for any career that involves working with children, including child care and education.
7511Advanced Child Development (Capstone)This capstone course prepares students for employment in the care and guidance of young children under the supervision of professional personnel. Instruction includes child and growth and development; nutrition; program planning and management; health and safety; guidance; recreational and play activities; child abuse and neglect; developmentally appropriate practices; interpersonal relationships; regulations; operational procedures; emergency and disaster procedures; policies, standards, and licensing; supervision and maintenance of children's environments; professionalism; and classroom management.
7520Intermediate Consumer Services (Concentrator)This concentration course prepares students to understand, analyze, manage, and maintain values, needs, wants, goals and resources, in order to make decisions that contribute to personal, family, and work life. Instruction includes decision making; earning an income, taxes, money management, financial planning, family economics, understanding the marketplace, selling methods, retail information; consumer rights and responsibilities, managing credit; housing decisions, equipment selection, energy saving techniques; the consumer as part of the national and global economy; and the organization of activities in the home as a means of successfully combining work and family roles. This course provides the background needed in a variety of careers that involve consumer information and purchasing, financial literacy, as well as financial planning.
7521Advanced Consumer Services (Capstone)This capstone course prepares students for employment in occupations in personal and financial services; product development, test and demonstration; energy; environment; and consumer communications. Instruction includes comparison shopping; consumer laws and regulations; selection and use of products and equipment; demonstration of new products; energy conservation methods; preparation of materials for publication, broadcast or telecast; interpretation of consumer needs to manufacturers, and methods of responding to customer inquiries. Students develop skills to process mail and phone orders; prepare reports; use industry technology; set up and arrange displays; determine customer needs and wants; select merchandise and products; and assist clients in the selection of services.
7530Intermediate Education (Concentrator)This concentration course prepares students for professional or learning support positions in education, prekindergarten through grade twelve. Students study human development; standards, regulations, and codes; positive guidance and counseling techniques; age-appropriate and grade-appropriate learning strategies; learning theories; and standards-based curriculum and instructional design.
7531Advanced Education (Capstone)This capstone course builds on concentration course content and is the final course taken in the Education pathway sequence. Students are prepared for a career or further postsecondary training. Students can apply and practice their knowledge and skills at a variety of elementary and secondary education sites.
7540Intermediate Family and Human Services (Concentrator)This concentration course prepares students to understand the basis, function, and significance of the interpersonal and family relations, human development, and individual needs throughout the life cycle. Instruction includes the meaning of family; quality relationships; love and commitment; marriage; major life adjustments; and parenting. Other topics of instruction can be good health habits; positive mental attitudes; management of stress; good nutrition; body systems; substance use and abuse; managing manipulation; relationships; pregnancy; diseases and infections; safety and emergency care; maintaining a healthy environment; values; goals; decision-making; interpersonal relationships and communication skills; and managing personal and family crisis. This course provides the needed background for a variety of careers involved with assisting in the care of children and family, family and human services, as well as the elderly.
7541Advanced Family and Human Services (Capstone)This capstone course prepares students for employment in occupations in family and social services. Instruction includes locating and accessing community resources and housing appropriate for low-income and other clients, and assisting professional staff with interviewing and compiling information. Instruction may include, but not be limited to, organizing and facilitating groups; scheduling activities that meet the needs and interests of individual members; attitudes and knowledge needed for employment in elder care and intergenerational services occupations, personal health habits and nutrition; the importance of social involvement and sensitivity to common problems experienced by individuals and families with special needs; supervision and safety of clients; common problems of families; professional standards, laws and regulations; and compiling information on social, educational or institutional history.
7600Introduction to Energy, Environment, and UtilitiesThis course provides students with an overview of the energy, environment and utilities sector, focuses on the principles of power and energy, and emphasizes sustainability practices and processes. It provides students with insight into the different pathways available within the sector and the different career opportunities associated with each pathway.
7610Introduction to Environmental ResourcesThis course will introduce students to career opportunities within the sector and provides an overview of the principles of power and energy, alternative/green/sustainable technologies, and the fundamentals of electrical power systems. It may also introduce students to the principles, concepts, and operations of residential and commercial energy and utilities industries.
7611Intermediate Environmental Resources (Concentrator)This course will build on foundational skills attained in the introductory course(s). Students will explore basic conventional and emerging principles and concepts of the energy industry, including energy production, energy transmission, and alternative energy technologies. The course may also cover nuclear and non-nuclear power generation technologies, their fuel sources, and plant operations (including: coal, oil, natural gas, solar, wind, geothermal power, hydroelectric, or biofuel). Students may learn research methods of energy procurement, transmission, distribution, and storage, and gain an understanding of interrelationships among components of electrical systems.
7612Advanced Environmental Resources (Capstone)This capstone course allows students to demonstrate mastery in skills attained in concentrator courses. Students will demonstrate understanding of the conventional and emerging principles and concepts of the energy industry, including energy production, energy transmission, and alternative/green/sustainable/renewable energy technologies. They will demonstrate understanding of the different types of electric power generation technologies and their fuel sources, the advantages and disadvantages of each, and their effect on the environment. Student may demonstrate mastery by explaining the components of electrical systems, the fission process, principles of biomass conversion, nuclear power generation; summarizing the basic operating principles of fossil, hydroelectric, and internal combustion systems; or being able to explain and apply Ohm’s Law.
7620Introduction to Energy and Power TechnologyThis course will introduce students to career opportunities within the sector and provides an overview of emerging energy and environmental technologies, such as include solar, wind, nuclear, renewable and non-renewable energy sources, and the associated environmental issues and societal response.
7621Intermediate Energy and Power Technology (Concentrator)This course will build on foundational skills attained in the introductory course(s). Students gain a deeper understanding of the science and technology of current and future energy sources along with the associated environmental problems and societal response. The course may cover concepts and principles of environmental resources, the role of law and policy in regulation and management of natural resources and the environment, and water and land use, including efficiency, quality, scarcity, and waste management.
7622Advanced Energy and Power Technology (Capstone)This capstone course allows students to demonstrate mastery in skills attained in concentrator courses. Students will demonstrate understanding of: energy resources and their effects on the environment; global interactive systems and elements that create and sustain climate; land use, air quality, and drinking water management systems, and their potential for environmental impact; storm water, rivers, and groundwater systems, and environmental legislation and regulations. Student may demonstrate mastery by evaluating regional interactive systems and elements that create harmful environmental effects, identifying the role and impact of waste management systems, implementing processes to support energy efficiency, and/or preparing an efficient solar heated water design and installation plan.
7630Introduction to TelecommunicationsThis course will introduce students to career opportunities and provide an overview of basic telecommunications principles and concepts. It may also examine the role and function of satellites, explore privacy and security issues, and examine the differences between fixed-wire and wireless telecommunications systems.
7631Intermediate Telecommunications (Concentrator)This course will build on foundational skills attained in the introductory course(s). Students will learn the basic and emerging technologies in the telecommunications industry and further examine the role and functions of satellites in telecommunications. Topics covered may also include: researching the components, interaction, and operations of fixed-wire and wireless telecommunications systems, and privacy and security issues related to telecommunications systems.
7632Advanced Telecommunications (Capstone)This capstone course allows students to demonstrate mastery in skills attained in concentrator courses. Students will demonstrate understanding of the basic and emerging technologies in the telecommunications industry and the role and functions of satellites in telecommunications. They may also demonstrate understanding of the components, interaction, and operations of fixed-wire and wireless telecommunications systems, privacy and security issues, and proficiency in customer relations within the telecommunications industry.
7700Introduction to Engineering and ArchitectureThis introduction course provides students with the foundational concepts required for pursuing career pathways within this industry sector. The skills and content knowledge helps prepare students to continue their education in multiple pathway concentrator courses within this industry sector.
7710Intermediate Architectural Design (Concentrator)This concentrator course builds upon the Engineering and Architecture introduction course and provides students with additional concepts and experiences required for career readiness and pursuing further education in Architectural Design career pathway, which precedes this pathway's capstone course. This concentrator course leads to the capstone course in the Architectural Design pathway's sequence of courses.
7711Advanced Architectural Design (Capstone)This capstone course further builds upon the Engineering and Architecture introduction course, and is the final course taken. This career technical education capstone course provides content, skill development and leadership training which prepare students for the world of work and to pursue further education such as industry certifications and a postsecondary degree.
7720Intermediate Engineering Technology (Concentrator)This concentrator course builds upon the Engineering and Architecture introduction course and provides students with additional concepts and experiences required for career readiness and pursuing further education in Engineering Technology career pathway, which precedes this pathway's capstone course. This concentrator course leads to the capstone course in the Engineering Technology pathway's sequence of courses.
7721Advanced Engineering Technology (Capstone)This capstone course further builds upon the Engineering and Architecture introduction course, multiple pathway concentrator courses, and is the final course taken which prepares students to work and pursue further education in multiple career pathways. This career technical education capstone course provides content, skill development and leadership training which prepare students for the world of work and to pursue further education such as industry certifications and a postsecondary degree.
7730Intermediate Engineering Design (Concentrator)This concentrator course builds upon the Engineering and Architecture introduction course and provides students with additional concepts and experiences required for career readiness and to pursue further education in the Engineering Design career pathway. This concentrator course leads to the capstone course in the Engineering Design pathway's sequence of courses.
7731Advanced Engineering Design (Capstone)This capstone course further builds upon the Engineering and Architecture introduction course, and Engineering Design pathway concentrator course/s, in this sector. The capstone is the final course taken in the complete sequence of courses. This career technical education capstone course provides content, skill development and leadership training which prepare students for the world of work and to pursue further education such as industry certifications and a postsecondary degree.
7740Intermediate Environmental Engineering (Concentrator)This concentrator course builds upon the Engineering and Architecture introduction course and provides students with additional concepts and experiences required for career readiness and pursuing further education in Environmental Engineering career pathway, which precedes this pathway's capstone course. This concentrator course leads to the capstone course in the Environmental Engineering pathway's sequence of courses.
7741Advanced Environmental Engineering (Capstone)This capstone course further builds upon the Engineering and Architecture introduction course and concentrator course/s, in this sector. The capstone is the final course taken in the complete sequence of courses. This career technical education capstone course provides content, skill development and leadership training which prepare students for the world of work and to pursue further education such as industry certifications and a postsecondary degree.
7800Introduction to Fashion and Interior DesignThis introductory course for the Fashion and Interior Design sector is the first in a sequence of courses that provides instruction in the eight content areas of Family and Consumer Sciences. The focus is on preparing students for personal and life management, and providing a strong foundation for Family and Consumer Sciences education related career paths. Instruction in the content areas of child development and guidance; consumer education; family and human development; education; fashion, textiles, and apparel; food and nutrition; housing and furnishings; individual and family health; and leadership is designed to prepare students with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to function effectively as family members, leaders, workers, and citizens.
7810Intermediate Fashion Design and Merchandising (Concentrator)This concentration course expands on the comprehensive core and prepares students to understand the social, psychological, physiological and design aspects of fashion, textiles, and apparel. Instruction includes apparel and behavior; elements and principles of design; color theory, wardrobe planning, history of apparel, specialized clothing, wardrobe budgets, retail options, textiles, garment care, alterations, personal and family clothing selection and purchase; design and construction of clothing, utilizing of advanced construction techniques; couture design elements; and modification of clothing to meet the special needs of individuals. This course is highly recommended for students interested in pursuing a career in the fashion industry.
7811Advanced Fashion Design and Merchandising (Capstone)This capstone course prepares students with the skills, attitudes, and knowledge needed for employment in the fashion design, manufacturing, maintenance, and merchandising of apparel and accessories, as well as industry certification. Instruction includes operational procedures; textiles identification and analysis; industry regulation, fabric selection, care and repair; the elements and principles of design; design apparel construction (including draping, pattern making, and grading); fitting and alteration. Instruction can also include merchandising and fashion forecasting, developing and merchandizing of a line, and using technology that is used in the industry. Students develop skills to select fabric, design and construction of apparel, fit and alter garments, product knowledge, illustrate designs, and merchandising techniques; sales and service; fashion forecasting; visual merchandising; operational procedure, inventory control, and loss prevention; cash and credit transactions; and technology used in the industry.
7820Intermediate Interior Design (Concentrator)This concentration course expands on the comprehensive core and prepares students to understand the physical, psychological, and social influences on complex housing decisions. The course includes the study of environmental concerns that impact housing, such as conservation of resources, materials, and construction technology, as well as the analysis of cultural, psychological, functional and aesthetic design concepts. Topics include design principles and elements; housing decisions; materials, furnishings, accessories, and equipment; color theory; space planning; textiles and finishes; landscaping; historical periods of architecture and furniture styles and the conditions that influenced them, and population trends. This course provides a background for a variety of careers in residential and commercial furnishings, interior design, and interior maintenance.
7821Advanced Interior Design (Capstone)This capstone course prepares students for employment in occupations concerned with furnishing and decorating residential and commercial properties. Instruction includes assisting purchasers in selecting and maintaining suitable furnishings and/or equipment; assisting interior designers, decorators or professional home service directors; selection of slipcovers, draperies, curtain and window treatments; upholstery; designing accessories as floral arrangements or decorations; designing space to address needs; the care and maintenance of residential and commercial floor surfaces, wall coverings, furnishings and equipment; and personal management.
7830Intermediate Makeup Artistry (Level 1) (Concentrator)This is the introductory/intermediate level course of a multi-level hour program (300 of 600 clock hours). The introductory course gives the students a comprehensive career opportunities and introductory skills in makeup artistry. Services in this level cover basic makeup applications, sanitation, color theory, skin conditions, health and safety of clients, product chemistry, and basic tools and equipment to perform services on clients for every day and special occasions, along with state laws/regulations.
7831Advanced Makeup Artistry (Level 2) (Capstone)This is the capstone or advanced course of a multi-level hour program (300 of 600 clock hours). In this advanced or capstone course students will learn advanced techniques, products, and equipment for makeup applications for fashion, specialty, high definition, photography, theatrical or stage, special effects for film/TV makeup applications. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in Introductory Make Artistry (Level 1).
7832Introduction to Barbering This is the Intro level course of a multi-level hour program (180 of 1500 clock hours). This introductory course gives the students a comprehensive career opportunities and industry skills into barbering within this pathway. Students will learn state laws/regulations, basic barbering concepts, health/safety regulations, licensing requirements for California, tools, products, and equipment used in barbering services.
7833Intermediate Level 2 Barbering (Concentrator)This course continues with the multi-level hour program (360 of 1500 clock hours). In this intermediate level 2 course students will continue to learn the theoretical and practical skills needed in barbering through the equipment, products, and techniques. Chemistry, haircutting, chemical services, shaving, and other components will be covered. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in the Intro to Barbering.
7834Intermediate Level 3 Barbering (Concentrator)This course continues with the multi-level hour program (540 of 1500 clock hours). In this concentrator level 3 course students will continue to develop and advance their skills in the practicum of barbering skills with tools, equipment, and products. Continued theoretical concepts in Barbering and preparing for state board licensure in California will be covered. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in the Intermediate – Level 2 Barbering.
7835Advanced Level 4 Barbering  (Capstone)This is the capstone or advanced level 4 course in the multi-level hour program (540 of 1500 clock hours) Students will prepare for state board licensure examination in California through theoretical and applied skills in hair styles, cutting, chemical services (i.e., bleaching, color, perms, and relaxers), facial care including shaving, health and safety for clients, disinfection/sanitation, and more for real world barbering skills. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better is the Concentrator – Level 3 Barbering.
7836Introduction to CosmetologyThis is the Intro level course of a multi-level hour program (180 of 1600 clock hours). This introductory course gives the students a comprehensive career opportunities and industry skills into cosmetology within this pathway. Students will learn state laws/regulations, basic cosmetology concepts, health/safety regulations, licensing requirements for California, tools, products, and equipment used in cosmetology services.
7837Intermediate Level 2 Cosmetology (Concentrator) This course continues with the multi-level hour program (360 of 1600 clock hours). In this intermediate level 2 course students will continue to learn the theoretical and practical skills needed in cosmetology through the equipment, products, and techniques. Chemistry, haircutting, chemical services, shaving, and other components will be covered. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in the Intro to Cosmetology.
7838Intermediate Level 3 Cosmetology (Concentrator)This course continues with the multi-level hour program (540 of 1600 clock hours). In this concentrator level 3 course students will continue to develop and advance their skills in the practicum of cosmetology skills with tools, equipment, and products. Continued theoretical concepts in Cosmetology and preparing for state board licensure in California will be covered. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in the Intermediate – Level 2 Cosmetology.
7839Advanced Level 4 Cosmetology This is the capstone or advanced level 4 course in the multi-level hour program (540 of 1600 clock hours) Students will prepare for state board licensure examination in California through theoretical and applied skills in hair styles, cutting, chemical services (i.e., bleaching, color, perms, and relaxers), facial care including waxing, health and safety for clients, disinfection/sanitation, and more for real world cosmetology skills. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better is the Concentrator – Level 3 Cosmetology.
7840Intermediate Level 1 Manicuring (Concentrator)This is the introductory/intermediate level course of a multi-level hour program (150 of 400 clock hours). The introductory course gives the students a comprehensive career opportunities and introductory skills in manicuring or nail technology. Services in this level cover basic manicuring, pedicures, sanitation, color theory, nail conditions, health and safety of clients, product chemistry, and basic tools and equipment to perform services on clients for every day and special occasions, including state laws/regulations for licensure preparation.
7841Advanced Level 2 Manicuring (Capstone)This is the capstone or advanced course of a multi-level hour program (300 of 400 clock hours). In this advanced or capstone course students will learn advanced techniques, products, and equipment for manicuring or nail technology in natural and artificial nail applications for fashion, specialty, high definition, photography, theatrical or stage, special effects for film/TV makeup applications. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in Introductory Manicuring (Level 1).
7900Introduction to Health Science and Medical TechnologyThis Exploratory/Introduction to Health Science and Medical Technology course provides students with the awareness of a variety of career options examining careers that work diagnostic, supportive, and therapeutic services and the requirements to achieve their career goals. Exploratory courses provide the foundational concepts in which students can begin to form future career choices that meet their individual career interest. Students are exposed to the general requirements for various careers in the healthcare field. Exploratory courses provide the basic experiences and activities that will set a foundation for entry into any one of the Health Science and Medical Technology pathways at introductory level courses.
7910Introduction to BiotechnologyThis introductory course is designed to provide students the necessary foundational technical skills of Health Sciences and integrated subject matter in science, mathematics, and English/language arts required to move to advanced curriculum and content in Health Science and Medical Technology. Student will have the opportunity to experience a variety of options leading to the broad career selection of a specific pathways with in Health Science and Medical Technology. Students will learn about the use of living systems and organisms to develop or make products, or "any technological application that uses biological systems, living organisms or derivatives thereof, to make or modify products or processes for specific use in Biotechnology.
7911Intermediate Biotechnology (Concentrator)This concentrator course is designed to provide students specific content knowledge and skills within the Biotechnology pathway. Courses are aligned to the basic knowledge levels necessary to learn and recognize word roots, prefixes, and suffixes used in medical language, understand the prevention, wellness, and disease process, and the associated skill application consistent with the Biotechnology pathways scope and practice in either direct or indirect client/patient services including short term certifications such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and automated external defilation.
7912Advanced Biotechnology (Capstone)This capstone course prepares students within a specific career in the various areas of Biotechnology that will enable them to complete the requirements for licensure, certification, or other industry recognized credentials; or students are prepared to enter into postsecondary education or training programs in the selected Biotechnology pathway. If applicable, course content will provide the knowledge and skills consistent with legislative requirements and the level of proficiency to perform skills within their identified scope of practice specific to employment.
7920Introduction to Patient CareThis Introductory course is designed to provide students the necessary foundational technical skills of Health Sciences and integrated subject matter in science, mathematics, and English/language arts required to move to advanced curriculum and content in Health Science and Medical Technology. Students have the opportunity to experience a variety of options leading to the broad career selection of a specific pathways with in Health Science and Medical Technology. Student will be introduced to the requirements of working in patient care careers, understanding all aspects of the interactions and responsibilities in working with people in diagnostic and therapeutic areas of health care.
7921Intermediate Patient Care (Concentrator)This concentrator course is designed to provide students specific content knowledge with industry skills and leadership development within the Patient Care pathway. Courses are aligned to the basic knowledge levels necessary to learn and recognize word roots, prefixes, and suffixes used in medical language, understand the prevention, wellness, and disease process, and the associated skill application consistent with the Patient Care pathways scope and practice in either direct or indirect client/patient services including short term certifications such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and automated external defilation.
7922Advanced Patient Care (Capstone)This capstone course prepares students within a specific career in the various areas of patient care that will enable them to complete the requirements for licensure, certification, or other industry recognized credentials; or students are prepared to enter into postsecondary education or training programs in the selected Patient Care pathway. If applicable, course content will provide the knowledge, industry skills and leadership development consistent with legislative requirements and the level of proficiency to perform skills within their identified scope of practice specific to employment.
7930Introduction to Healthcare Administrative ServicesThis introductory course is designed to provide students the necessary foundational technical skills of Health Sciences and integrated subject matter in science, mathematics, and English/language arts required to move to advanced curriculum and content in Health Science and Medical Technology. Student will have the opportunity to experience a variety of options leading to the broad career selection of a specific pathways with in Health Science and Medical Technology. Students will be exposed to the knowledge and skills necessary to communicate health/medical information accurately within legal/regulatory bounds, information coding and systems, health care operations and human resources.
7931Intermediate Healthcare Administrative Services (Concentrator)This concentrator course is designed to provide students specific content knowledge and skills within the Healthcare Administrative Services pathway. Courses are aligned to the basic knowledge levels necessary to learn and recognize word roots, prefixes, and suffixes used in medical language, understand the prevention, wellness, and disease process, and the associated skill application consistent with the Healthcare Administrative Services pathways scope and practice in either direct or indirect client/patient services including short term certifications such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and automated external defilation.
7932Advanced Healthcare Administrative Services (Capstone)This capstone course prepares students within a specific career in the various areas of Healthcare Administrative Services that will enable them to complete the requirements for licensure, certification, or other industry recognized credentials; or students are prepared to enter into postsecondary education or training programs in the selected Healthcare Administrative Services pathway. If applicable, course content will provide the knowledge and skills consistent with legislative requirements and the level of proficiency to perform skills within their identified scope of practice specific to employment.
7940Introduction to Healthcare Operational Support ServicesThis introductory course is designed to provide students the necessary foundational technical skills of Health Sciences and integrated subject matter in science, mathematics, and English/language arts required to move to advanced curriculum and content in Health Science and Medical Technology. Student will have the opportunity to experience a variety of options leading to the broad career selection of a specific pathways with in Health Science and Medical Technology. Students will learn about supportive services occurring in hospital, clinics and other healthcare delivery facilities that include healthy and safe physical environmental services, infection prevention processes and technology, quick and efficient transports, equipment maintenance, materials, and food services.
7941Intermediate Healthcare Operational Support (Concentrator)This concentrator course is designed to provide students specific content knowledge and skills within the Mental and Behavioral Health pathway. Courses are aligned to the basic knowledge levels necessary to learn and recognize word roots, prefixes, and suffixes used in medical language, understand the prevention, wellness, and disease process, and the associated skill application consistent with the Mental and Behavioral Health pathways scope and practice in either direct or indirect client/patient services including short term certifications such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and automated external defilation.
7942Advanced Healthcare Operational Support (Capstone)This capstone course prepares students within a specific career in the various areas of Healthcare Operational Support that will enable them to complete the requirements for licensure, certification, or other industry recognized credentials; or students are prepared to enter into postsecondary education or training programs in the selected Healthcare Operational Support pathway. If applicable, course content will provide the knowledge and skills consistent with legislative requirements and the level of proficiency to perform skills within their identified scope of practice specific to employment.
7950Introduction to Public and Community HealthThis introductory course is designed to provide students the necessary foundational technical skills of Health Sciences and integrated subject matter in science, mathematics, and English/language arts required to move to advanced curriculum and content in Health Science and Medical Technology. Student will have the opportunity to experience a variety of options leading to the broad career selection of a specific pathways with in Health Science and Medical Technology. Student will be introduced to understand the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting health through organized efforts, informed choices of society, organizations, public and private, communities and individuals. Public heal occupations look at the concerns and threats to health based on population health analysis.
7951Intermediate Public and Community Health (Concentrator)This concentrator course is designed to provide students specific content knowledge and skills within the Public and Community Health pathway. Courses are aligned to the basic knowledge levels necessary to learn and recognize word roots, prefixes, and suffixes used in medical language, understand the prevention, wellness, and disease process, and the associated skill application consistent with the Public and Community Health pathways scope and practice in either direct or indirect client/patient services including short term certifications such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and automated external defilation.
7952Advanced Public and Community Health (Capstone)This capstone course provides students within a specific careers in the various areas of Public and Community Health that will enable them to complete the requirements for licensure, certification, or other industry recognized credentials; or students are prepared to enter into postsecondary education or training programs in the selected Mental and Behavioral Health pathway. If applicable, course content will provide the knowledge and skills consistent with legislative requirements and the level of proficiency to perform skills within their identified scope of practice specific to employment.
7960Introduction to Mental and Behavioral HealthThis introductory course is designed to provide students the necessary foundational technical skills of Health Sciences and integrated subject matter in science, mathematics, and English/language arts required to move to advanced curriculum and content in Health Science and Medical Technology. Student will have the opportunity to experience a variety of options leading to the broad career selection of a specific pathways with in Health Science and Medical Technology. Student will be introduced to the requirements of working in mental and behavioral health occupations, understanding, diagnosis and treatment of an individual’s emotional, psychological, and social aspect of maintaining and or achieving wellness.
7961Intermediate Mental and Behavioral Health (Concentrator)This concentrator course is designed to provide students specific content knowledge and skills within the Mental and Behavioral Health pathway. Courses are aligned to the basic knowledge levels necessary to learn and recognize word roots, prefixes, and suffixes used in medical language, understand the prevention, wellness, and disease process, and the associated skill application consistent with the Mental and Behavioral Health pathways scope and practice in either direct or indirect client/patient services including short term certifications such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and automated external defilation.
7962Advanced Mental and Behavioral Health (Capstone)This capstone course prepares students within a specific career in the various areas of Mental and Behavioral Health that will enable them to complete the requirements for licensure, certification, or other industry recognized credentials; or students are prepared to enter into postsecondary education or training programs in the selected Mental and Behavioral Health pathway. If applicable, course content will provide the knowledge and skills consistent with legislative requirements and the level of proficiency to perform skills within their identified scope of practice specific to employment.
8000Introduction to Hospitality, Tourism, and RecreationThis introductory course in the Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreation sector is the first in a sequence of courses that provides instruction in the eight content areas of Family and Consumer Sciences. The focus is on preparing students for personal and life management, and providing a strong foundation for Family and Consumer Sciences education related career paths. Instruction in the content areas of child development and guidance; consumer education; family and human development; education; fashion, textiles, and apparel; food and nutrition; housing and furnishings; individual and family health; and leadership is designed to prepare students with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to function effectively as family members, leaders, workers, and citizens.
8010Intermediate Food Science, Dietetics, and Nutrition (Concentrator)This concentration course includes instruction in researching information to evaluate an individual's diet, and adequacy of essential nutrients supplied in the diet; physiology and utilization of nutrients by the body; contribution of nutrients to general health; dietary needs during the life cycle; food regulations by government agencies; impact of additives, environmental contaminants, food-borne illnesses, food faddism and quackery; cultural factors in food choices; new food technology; and the chemical and biological relation of food. This course provides a strong background for nutritional science, dietetics, as well as careers related to the food industry.
8011Advanced Food Science, Dietetics, and Nutrition (Capstone)This capstone course prepares students for employment in occupations in the food science and technology, dietetics, and nutrition industries. Instruction includes meeting nutritional and dietary needs; planning, selecting, purchasing and preparing of food to conserve nutrients; operational procedures; food safety and sanitation; using dietary and food guidelines to plan healthy diets; food preferences; data and statistics; and marketing. Students develop skills to utilize nutritional knowledge in preparing, inspecting, and serving meals to people with special counseling under the direction of a dietetic technician or professional dietitian; identifying qualities of various foods; collecting and testing food samples as directed; recording and comparing test results; purchasing and maintaining laboratory supplies and inventory.
8020Intermediate Food Service and Hospitality (Concentrator)This concentration course prepares students to understand the scientific principles of nutrition, the relationship of nutrition to health and well-being, and also prepares students with food production, preparation, and service skills. Instruction includes topics such as finding nutritive food values; planning, selecting, storing, purchasing, preparing, testing, serving and selling of quality food and food products; nutrition and health; safety and emergencies; food safety and sanitation; meal management; food preparation; food purchasing; food in culture; the science of food and nutrition; food costs and production; and food technology. This course provides a solid background for a wide range of careers such as food service and hospitality, food science, dietetics, and nutrition.
8021Advanced Food Service and Hospitality (Capstone)This capstone course prepares students for employment in occupations in the food science and technology, dietetics, and nutrition industries. Instruction includes meeting nutritional and dietary needs; planning, selecting, purchasing and preparing of food to conserve nutrients; operational procedures; food safety and sanitation; using dietary and food guidelines to plan healthy diets; food preferences; data and statistics; and marketing. Students develop skills to utilize nutritional knowledge in preparing, inspecting, and serving meals to people with special counseling under the direction of a dietetic technician or professional dietitian; identifying qualities of various foods; collecting and testing food samples as directed; recording and comparing test results; purchasing and maintaining laboratory supplies and inventory.
8030Intermediate Hospitality, Tourism and Recreation (Concentrator)This concentration course prepares students for employment in occupations in hospitality, tourism, and recreation. Instruction includes providing hospitality services in diverse settings to meet the needs of a wide variety of clients; eco-tourism; guest services; geography of the continents; customs and culture of countries as tourist destinations; special documentation needed for international travel; planning events to client specifications; recreational opportunities related to on-site and off-site attractions; and environmental and ecological principles.
8031Advanced Hospitality, Tourism and Recreation (Capstone)This capstone course prepares students with the skills, attitudes, and knowledge needed for employment in the lodging industry, travel-related service occupations, and/or theme parks, attractions, outdoor recreation, and exhibitions and event-planning. Topics covered include lodging terminology; the history of lodging; marketing; property management; guest psychology and relationships; lodging operations; food and beverage services; convention services; business management; industry awareness and policies; security and emergency procedures; salesmanship and guest satisfaction; computer applications; geography; culture and customs; reservations and ticketing; travel itineraries; international travel; and technology used in the industry. Additional instruction could include trade shows, fairs, and conferences; outdoor recreation and management; financial transactions; tourism; client information and planning specialized events to include themes, timelines, budgets, target audiences, objectives, agendas and public relations related to support services within the lodging industry. This program provides a strong background for careers in Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreation, as well as Lodging and Hotel Operations, and/or Theme Parks, Attractions, and Events.
8100Introduction to Information and Communication TechnologiesThis course provides students with foundational knowledge of programming and computer science. Students will explore topics of human computer interaction, problem solving, web design, computer programming, data modeling, and robotics. Throughout the course, students will understand the algorithmic underpinnings of computer applications and gain technical expertise using computational tools. Other areas of the sector could be introduced such as software design, networking, game design, information support, and topics like artificial intelligence, and robotics. Social issues in ICT will be introduced such as hacking and cybersecurity, social media usage and protecting personal information, the digital divide, open government data, and ethical computing. Course titles may also include: Exploring Computer Science, Introduction to Computer Science A; Computer Principles; Introduction to Information and Communication Technologies; Introduction to Computer Technologies.
8110Introduction to Information Support ServicesThis course will introduce students to computer usage and functionality, operating systems, the main system components, network connectivity, software installation, data backup, trouble-shooting, and system administration. The role of ICT in organizations and business processes using tools such as organizational charts, flowcharts, and timelines will be discussed. Client relations and communications will be introduced along with information gathering techniques, and critical thinking and listening as part of problem solving.
8111Intermediate Information Support Services (Concentrator)This course is project-based and designed to provide students with hands-on use of software applications while studying computer concepts such as accessing and transmitting information in a networked environment. Students will learn the processes associated with system administration and planning, acquiring, installing, and implementing of software and systems. Learning to work in teams in order to understand client needs, evaluate different possible solutions, pricing systems within budget constraints, and understanding continual improvement cycles are goals.
8112Advanced Information Support Services (Capstone)This course allows students to demonstrate management and implementation of various information, technology, and communication projects. Projects could take the form of enterprise information security plans that include identifying vulnerabilities and deciding what methods to use to achieve cybersecurity. Other projects include developing user training programs to enable simple problem resolutions, help-desk programs, system life-cycle programs that include planning, purchasing, implementing, and integrating of systems for continual improvement.
8120Introduction to NetworkingThis course introduces students to networking terminology and concepts as well as the principles of networking and various technologies, models, and protocols used in networking. Various types of network media and topologies will be introduced as well as network devices and their functions. Concepts covered include network standards of recognized organizations, Open System Interconnect (OSI) network layers, and transmission-control/internet protocol (TCP/IP) and the various network environments.
8121Intermediate Networking (Concentrator)This course allows students to perform hands-on tasking and planning for implementing network systems and/or subsystems after receiving safety training handling network hardware and power supplies. Students will evaluate networking tasks and select network components, media, and protocols to solve networking challenges. Other skills learned include network addressing, configuring, troubleshooting, security, monitoring network traffic and reading system indicators to troubleshoot problems, network administration and accounts, and system backup
8122Advanced Networking (Capstone)This course allows students to demonstrate network administration and management skills in various networking projects. Possible projects include implementing network security tools to identify network vulnerabilities and performing network security penetration testing, assessment, proposing resolutions, and forming security plans for implementation. Other projects include identifying network threats to cyber security and plans for disaster prevention and recovery, analyzing client networking needs and requirements and developing possible alternatives to meet client needs.
8130Introduction to Systems ProgrammingThis course will introduce the systems development process to students. Topics covered include the development life cycle, development models, specifications and requirements, working in development teams, use of versions, and diagramming processes using flowcharts and Unified Modeling Language.
8131Intermediate Systems Programming (Concentrator)This course provides students with the fundamental knowledge of computer programming for solving applied problems. Topics covered include using various programming languages, protocols, language syntax, data structures, object oriented concepts, interfaces, sorting and searching algorithms, and developing reports. Also covered, software testing, debugging, and improvement, integrated development using object-oriented programming and sensory information from robots to solve problems and meet challenges integrating STEM subjects.
8132Advanced Systems Programming (Capstone)This course emphasizes object-oriented programming methodology with a concentration on problem solving and algorithm development. Students apply discrete programming skills to make a video game, a virtual pet, a sound editor, etc. and will explore careers in programming, including wireless applications for iPhone, Android, and applications. It also includes the study of data structures, design, and abstraction. Other topics might include developing databases and data modeling.
8133Introduction to Web and Social Media Programming and DesignThis course will introduce students to the integration of various media into programming assignments including Web assignments. Students will also be introduced to the basic design elements used in interactive media. Other topics include encoding methods, using media design and editing software, animation and drawing software as well as image editors and three-dimensional design. Online content delivery process will be outlined as well as establishing online presence and e-commerce capabilities and Web security. Simple coding assignments using HTML and Cascading Style Sheets are used to teach basic Web design including the use of images, hyperlinks, tables, forms, video and audio.
8134Intermediate Web and Social Media Programming and Design (Concentrator)This course allows students to work on various projects such as Web-based businesses, e-portfolios, and mobile apps. Students will learn to create multimedia productions and presentations, implement standard graphical programming techniques for object movement, create graphical user interfaces, and apply graphic design principles and visual communication techniques. Other topics include capturing images by developing camera skills and making choices lenses, depth, motion and lighting, developing digitally generated and enhanced media, modeling, simulation, animation and image retouching.
8135Advanced Web and Social Media Programming and Design (Capstone)This course allows students to produce multimedia projects from concept (content gathering/research) to project completion (authoring/transmission) taking into account media that would be used by enterprises or mobile apps for marketing, corporate communication, and public use. As part of these projects students produce professional-level media, images, documents, audio, and video clips and software. Some projects might include Artificial Intelligence methods and behaviors to create web robots (bots) such as chat bots, etc.
8140Introduction to Games and SimulationThis course introduces students to the history, art, and science of game development and the unique differences between automated versus non-automated gaming. Students will be introduced to game and simulation analysis, design, documentation, and development tools.
8141Intermediate Games and Simulation (Concentrator)This course allows students to work in teams to develop games or simulations. Students will learn skills such as storyboarding, plot, flow, and using functions. Learning how to implement standard game/simulation strategy and rules of play as well as integrating mixed media appropriate to the game design/simulation will be included. Other topics include design specifications, delivery, rules of play, navigation functionality, scoring, and other special features.
8142Advanced Games and Simulation (Capstone)This course allows students to learn and display mastery of advanced game design/simulation skills in projects they design individually or in teams. Advanced skills include applying programming skills for rendering single player or multiuser games or simulation projects, program control, branching, memory management, strategies, and implementation. Using Artificial Intelligence techniques such as finite state machines in nonplayer characters could be included.
8200Introduction to Manufacturing and Product DevelopmentThis introduction course provides students with the foundational concepts required for pursuing career pathways within this industry sector. The skills and content knowledge helps prepare students to continue their education in multiple pathway concentrator courses within this industry sector.
8210Intermediate Graphic Production Technologies (Concentrator)This concentrator course builds upon the Manufacturing and Product Development introduction course and provides students with additional concepts and experiences required for career readiness and pursuing further education in the Graphic Production career pathway, which precedes this pathway's capstone course. This concentrator course leads to the capstone course in the Graphic Production pathway's sequence of courses.
8211Advanced Graphic Production Technologies (Capstone)This capstone course further builds upon the Manufacturing and Product Development introduction course and pathway concentrator course in the industry sector and is the final course taken in a sequence of courses which prepares students to work and pursue further education in multiple career pathways. This career technical education capstone course provides content, skill development and leadership training which prepare students for the world of work and to pursue further education such as industry certifications and a postsecondary degree.
8220Intermediate Machining and Forming Technologies (Concentrator)This concentrator course builds upon the Manufacturing and Product Development introduction course and provides students with additional concepts and experiences required for career readiness and pursuing further education in the Machining and Forming Technologies career pathway, which precedes this pathway's capstone course. This concentrator course leads to the capstone course in the Machining and Forming Technologies pathway's sequence of courses.
8221Advanced Machining and Forming Technologies (Capstone)This capstone course further builds upon the Manufacturing and Product Development introduction course and provides students with additional concepts and experiences required for career readiness and pursuing further education in Machining and Forming Technologies career pathway, which precedes this pathway's capstone course. This career technical education capstone course provides content, skill development and leadership training which prepare students for the world of work and to pursue further education such as industry certifications and a postsecondary degree.
8230Intermediate Welding and Materials Joining (Concentrator)This concentrator course builds upon the Manufacturing and Product Development introduction course and provides students with additional concepts and experiences required for career readiness and pursuing further education in Welding and Materials Joining career pathway, which precedes this pathway's capstone course. This concentrator course leads to the capstone course in the Welding and Materials Joining pathway's sequence of courses.
8231Advanced Welding and Materials Joining (Capstone)This capstone course further builds upon the Manufacturing and Product Development introduction and the Welding and Materials Joining concentrator courses. This career technical education capstone course provides content, skill development and leadership training which prepare students for the world of work and to pursue further education such as industry certifications and a postsecondary degree.
8240Intermediate Product Innovation and Design (Concentrator)This concentrator course builds upon the Manufacturing and Product Development introduction course and provides students with additional concepts and experiences required for career readiness and pursuing further education in Product Innovation and Design career pathway, which precedes this pathway's capstone course. This concentrator course leads to the capstone course in the Product Innovation and Design pathway's sequence of courses.
8241Advanced Product Innovation and Design (Capstone)This capstone course further builds upon the Manufacturing and Product Development introduction and the Product Innovation and Design concentrator courses. This career technical education capstone course provides content, skill development and leadership training which prepare students for the world of work and to pursue further education such as industry certifications and a postsecondary degree.
8300Introduction to Marketing, Sales, and ServiceThis course content includes foundational concepts for each of the three pathways within the Marketing, Sales, and Services Sector including Entrepreneurship, Marketing, and Professional Sales. Subject matter includes market research, economics, marketing budgets, creative development and design, and marketing foundations/functions with emphasis on public relations, advertising, branding, promotion, product/service management, pricing and distribution.
8310Intermediate Marketing (Concentrator)This concentrator course content builds on Introduction to Marketing, Sales, and Service course content. Specialized programs of study in this field may include sports marketing, hospitality marketing, advertising or market research. Students demonstrate the acquisition of content through the development of marketing plans and campaigns.
8311Advanced Marketing (Capstone)This capstone course content builds on previous course content and may focus on advanced strategies and marketing concepts that culminate in this final course of the Marketing pathway sequence. Specialized programs of study in this field may include sports marketing, hospitality marketing, and advertising or market research.
8320Intermediate Professional Sales (Concentrator)This concentrator course content builds on Introduction to Marketing, Sales, and Service content. Knowledge and skills in theory and practice of sales designed to provide a professional foundation to those involved in personal selling careers, including the fundamentals of personal selling with an emphasis on customer behavior, persuasive presentation of ideas, products and services, and developing sales goals are covered. Students demonstrate the acquisition of content through the development of sales forecasts, presentations, etc. to drive sales activities.
8321Advanced Professional Sales (Capstone)This capstone course content builds on previous course content and may focus on advanced strategies and Professional Sales concepts that culminate in this final course of the Professional Sales pathway sequence.
8330Entrepreneurship/Self-Employment (Concentrator)This concentrator course content builds on Introduction to Marketing, Sales, and Service course content. Knowledge and skills common to entrepreneurs and entrepreneurship, including the human characteristics vital for entrepreneurial thinking in a twenty-first century global world are covered. Entrepreneurial thinking may be applied to all industry sectors. Business knowledge and skills required for entrepreneurs as well as intangible skills and knowledge such as creativity and innovation skills are developed. Students demonstrate the acquisition of content through the research and development of business plans.
8331Advanced Entrepreneurship/Self-Employment (Capstone)This capstone course content builds on previous course content and may focus on advanced strategies and Entrepreneurial concepts that culminate in this final course of the Advanced Entrepreneurship/Self-Employment pathway sequence.
8400Introduction to Public ServicesThis introduction course provides students with the awareness of a variety of career options and the foundational concepts in which they can begin to form future career choices that meet their individual career interest. Students are exposed to the specific requirements for various careers in the Emergency Response, Legal Practices, Public Safety, and the academic, physical and civic responsibility to achieve their career goals in a service career. Introductory courses provide the basic experiences and activities and leadership development that will set a foundation for entry into any one of the Public Services pathways at introductory level courses.
8410Introduction to Public Safety (Introduction)This course introduces theories, principals, and techniques used in occupations that fall under the heading of Public Safety including police, corrections, and homeland security. Policies, procedures, and skills needed in services that provide for the safety and security of people and property and prevention of theft and damage are included.
8411Intermediate Public Safety (Concentration)This course includes intermediate academic and skill development courses that describe the role of specific careers in Public Safety, including of science in solving crimes using an evidence-based system. Topics could include the history and role of the agency, laboratory and scientific evidence, processing evidence, establishing hypotheses and drawing conclusions. Students will also explore various career opportunities for decision making to move onto advanced coursework.
8412Advanced Public Safety (Capstone)This course is designed to prepare individuals for specific careers or jobs in Public Safety such as law enforcement, homeland security, and corrections. Content of these various courses would contain the essential knowledge and skill development of that specific career. Students will learn about the specific organizational structure of the oversite agency, laws regulations and policy for specific agencies, state laws and guidelines for career entry as well as certification hours, skill proficiency and employment requirement for the specific career in Public Safety. Students develop the skills both academically and physically to meet the demands of the specific career, the understanding of the importance of having a clean background check and the understanding of ethic, morals, and service to the community. Students will have to opportunity to participate in workplace learning, prepare for postsecondary options and qualify to take examinations and certification as set forth by California State regulation and agency requirements of age, skill, and knowledge.
8420Introduction to Emergency Response (Introduction)This course is the introductory course in the Emergency Response Pathway and provides students with decision making information about careers in Emergency Response careers or to pursue advanced skill training in Emergency Services. Course content includes classroom instruction, hands-on training and community experience. This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the variety of agencies, employment opportunities and necessary skill requirements in the many career in Emergency Services. Information included will be will be in the field of fire and emergency operations, disaster response and emergency management, latest industry principles, theory, and best practices. Students learn tactical operations, safety, leadership, and community outreach and response techniques.
8421Intermediate Emergency Response (Concentration)This course provides students with an outline of the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) system, state and community emergency systems, introduces students to environment citizen emergency assessment, skill development, as well as provides pathophysiology and immediate action and care for various emergencies. It covers techniques of emergency environmental, community action and medical care presently considered within the responsibilities of the first responders, fires service careers, and emphasizes the development of student skills in recognition of symptoms of illnesses and injuries and proper procedures of emergency care. Emphasis is placed on communication, operations, community action and patient care in accordance with the California State EMS Agencies
8422Advanced Emergency Response (Capstone)This course is designed to prepare individuals for specific careers or jobs in Emergency Services. Content of these various courses would contain the essential knowledge and skill development of that specific career. Students will learn about the specific organizational structure of the oversite agency, laws regulations and policy for specific agencies, state laws and guidelines for career entry as well as certification hours, skill proficiency and employment requirement for the specific career in Emergency Services. Students will have the opportunity to participate in workplace learning, prepare for postsecondary options and qualify to take examinations and certification as set forth by California State regulation and agency requirement of age, skill, and knowledge.
8430Introduction to Legal Practices (Introduction)This course allows students to survey the range of legal careers including paralegals, attorneys, social justice advocates, mediators, and other occupations. The course provides students with a basis for understanding the American political and legal systems, with a focus on legal ideas and the legal process, how the law works and the sources of US law. Legal research and writing are introduced.
8431Intermediate Legal Practices (Concentration)This concentrator course is designed to provide students specific content knowledge with industry skills and leadership development within the Legal Practices pathways. Courses are designed to provide an understating and application of laws that affect everyday life; families, business, social decision making and the relationship to policies. Course could include content knowledge within historical, philosophical, and institutional contexts of social and economic justice and human rights.
8432Advanced Legal Practices (Capstone)This capstone course allows students to examine how statutes and policies are developed to safeguard society throughout history and the relationship to today legal practices. Students will understand the analysis of civil rights and liberties, and the ways courts and legislators deal with constitutional questions. Student will develop the skill and knowledge relevant to the needs of modern legal practice, entry into legal practice careers, necessary pathways and preparation into postsecondary advancement and future job prospects and the progression to higher level careers in Legal Practices.
8500Introduction to TransportationThis course includes foundational concepts required for pursuing further education in each of the three pathways within the transportation sector including: Operations, Structural Repair and Refinishing, and Systems Diagnostics, Service, and Repair. Instructional content of this course may lead the student directly into an intermediate pathway course within the transportation sector.
8510Introduction to OperationsThis introductory course will offer first year students a unique perspective of the role the transportation industry has on the global economy. Students will be made aware of the range or diversity of employment opportunities available within this pathway such as the distribution, logistics, and warehousing of goods, materials and mass transit. The student will also be made aware of all the forms of transportation necessary to achieve these efforts.
8511Intermediate Operations (Concentrator)This concentrator level course provides more specific areas of focus such as planning, management, and the infrastructure required for the distribution and logistics of materials and products. The instruction will also concentrate on operating and managing facilities designed for the movement of goods, materials and mass transit.
8512Advanced Operations (Capstone)This capstone course will provide students with the opportunity to function in a variety of roles within this pathway. Students will demonstrate competency in the knowledge and skills acquired in introductory and concentration level courses. Students will participate in work-based learning opportunities which can lead to internships. Students that successfully complete the course of study will qualify for industry recognized certifications. Upon completion of this course, students will be prepared for an entry level position at a facility that provides the movement of goods, materials, and/or mass transit.
8520Introduction to Structural Repair and RefinishingThis introductory course will offer first year students a unique perspective of the skills and knowledge required for a entry level position in the structural repair and refinishing sector of the transportation industry. The instruction will concentrate on the fundamentals of collision repair and refinishing of motor driven vehicles. This will include an introduction to panel repair, sanding, taping, masking, and painting. Spot, MIG, and Oxy/Acetylene welding will be introduced. Safety and proper tool use and identification is stressed.
8521Intermediate Structural Repair and Refinishing (Concentrator)This concentrator level course will build on the knowledge and skills obtained in the introductory level course. This course provides more specific areas of focus such as proficiency in spot and MIG welding, full panel replacement and preparation as well as painting and refinishing. The student will also become familiar with the entire repair process from estimation through to final fit and finish. Students will also become familiar with interior, upholstery, and detailing work.
8522Advanced Structural Repair and Refinishing (Capstone)This capstone level course will provide students with the opportunity to function in a variety of roles within this pathway. Students will demonstrate competency in the skills and knowledge acquired in introductory and concentration level courses. Students will participate in work-based learning opportunities which can lead to internships. Students that successfully complete the course of study will qualify for industry recognized certifications. Upon completion of this course, students will be prepared for an entry level position at a vehicle collision and refinishing facility.
8530Introduction to Systems Diagnostics, Service, and RepairThis introductory course will offer first year students a unique perspective of the skills and knowledge required for an entry level position in the systems diagnostics, service, and repair of vehicles of the twenty first century. The instruction will concentrate on but will not limited to the fundamentals of shop safety, tool identification and proper use along with basic repairs and maintenance of modern vehicles.
8531Intermediate Systems Diagnostics, Service, and Repair (Concentrator)This concentrator level course provides more specific areas of focus such as system diagnosis, advanced service, maintenance, and repair. The instruction will also concentrate on support systems such as engine performance, braking, steering, cooling, and electrical/electronic components. The student will also be exposed to transmissions and differentials.
8532Advanced Systems Diagnostics, Service, and Repair (Capstone)This capstone level course will provide students with the opportunity to function in a variety of roles within this pathway. Students will demonstrate competency in the skills and knowledge acquired in introductory and concentration level courses. Students will participate in work-based learning opportunities which can lead to internships. Students that successfully complete the course of study will qualify for industry recognized certifications. Upon completion of this course, students will be prepared for an entry level position at a vehicle repair facility.
9000Visual ArtVisual Arts courses typically cover design elements and principles, language, materials, and creative processes used to produce various kinds of visual arts. Visual Arts courses provide students with knowledge and opportunities to explore a variety of art forms and to create individual works of art. Students address the artistic processes of creating, presenting, responding and connecting and become artistically literate within the art form. The use of skills such as communication, creativity, critical thinking, and problem solving are part of every course, the 21st Century Skills, which contribute to student success in a global economy and in culturally diverse environments. Visual arts courses include the traditional fine arts such as, but not limited to, drawing, painting, ceramics, metals, printmaking, fiber arts, photography, sculpture, works in wood, and mixed media; architectural, environmental, and industrial arts such as urban interior, product, and landscape design as well as the folk arts.
9001Art HistoryArt History courses typically introduce students to a survey of significant works of art, artists, and artistic movements that have shaped the arts world, and have influenced, or reflected periods of history in the arts disciplines of dance, music, theatre and visual art. The course covers the connections of the arts to social, political, and historical events in the world/nation or series of artists, women in art, as well as contemporary issues and developments. Included is the analysis of visual images as they have been used and are used to express the needs and ideals of society, as well as those of the individual. The course provides for students to experience creating, performing/presenting/producing, responding, and connecting their own works as well as the works of others.
9002Advanced Placement (AP) Studio Art:3-D DesignSee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9003Advanced Placement (AP) Studio Art: 2-D DesignSee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9004Advanced Placement (AP) Studio Art: DrawingSee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9005Advanced Placement (AP) Art HistorySee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9006International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme (IB MYP) Visual ArtsSee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/middle-years-programme/curriculum/.
9007International Baccalaureate (IB) Visual ArtsSee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9020College Credit Course - Visual ArtsCollege visual arts courses typically cover a variety of visual arts courses that are taken by a student in which the student earns college credit (dual or concurrent enrollment). This course may also count toward the high school graduation requirements (i.e., the student receives both college credit and high school credit). This is not an Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) course (AP and IB courses have their own Course Group State Codes).
9021Pre-AP Visual ArtsSee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9022Art Appreciation K-12Art appreciation courses typically cover topics such as the relationship of art to social, political and historical events in the world, museum studies, as well as contemporary issues and developments in history and art. Art Appreciation courses present students with the opportunity to analyze visual images as they have been used and are used to express the needs and ideals of society, as well as those of the individual.
9051BusinessBusiness courses typically cover the basics of personal finance, techniques for making wise consumer decisions, economic principles, and business operation. Students develop techniques for making wise consumer decisions, master economic principles, and learn how businesses operate. These courses are not part of a career technical education course sequence.
9052International Baccalaureate (IB) Business and ManagementSee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9060Computer literacyComputer Literacy courses typically cover, through hands-on operation, to the use of programmable devices. Students develop skills necessary to operate computing devices that perform a variety of tasks based on needs and preferences.
9061Exploring Computer ScienceExploring Computer Science is a specific curriculum that was developed by UCLA Center X (http://www.exploringcs.org/). This course introduces students to the breadth of the field of computer science through an exploration of engaging and accessible topics. The goal of Exploring Computer Science is to develop in students the computational thinking practices of abstraction, algorithm development, creating artifacts, communicating and collaboration while building skills in specific programming languages and design environments. The course presents computing problems in real-world scenarios, allowing students to deepen their understanding of theoretical concepts while bringing computer science alive through real applications and connections.Rather than focusing the entire course on learning particular software tools or programming languages, the course is designed to focus the conceptual ideas of computing and help students understand why certain tools or languages might be utilized to solve particular problems. The goal of Exploring Computer Science is to develop in students the computational thinking practices of algorithm development, problem solving and programming within the context of problems that are relevant to the lives of today’s students. Students will also be introduced to topics such as interface design, limits of computers and societal and ethical issues.
9062Computer ScienceComputer Science courses typically cover problem-solving methods, algorithm development, modular system design, and systematic testing. Students are taught about abstract data structures, techniques for data manipulation and common algorithms. Computer coding and program structure are introduced using a standard programming language. The course may provide opportunities to apply the learned skills to relevant applications, such as modeling, data management, graphics, and text processing. Students learn about computer organization, including digital logic, operating systems, and networks. These courses are not usually part of a career technical education course sequence.
9063Computer programmingComputer programming courses typically cover the principles and programming styles used in the design and implementation of computer programs. Students are introduced to the history of programming languages, language syntax, data representation, language processors such as compilers and interpreters. The course focuses on particular language constructs and their realization in a variety of programming languages. A particular language is used to provide students with practical illustrations of various programming principles, such as creating programs to use variables to store and modify data, compare and refine algorithms, and create sequences or commands or loops to express ideas. These courses are not usually part of a career technical education course sequence.
9064Web DesignWeb Design courses typically cover the history of the internet, search engines, web design, web navigation, web graphics, hosting, and publishing. Students aquire skills related to the web design process, navigation strategies, creation and editing of graphics, web hosting services, and web publishing. These courses are usually not part of a career technical education course sequence.
9065International Baccalaureate Middle Years Program (IB MYP): DesignSee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/middle-years-programme/curriculum/.
9066Advanced Placement (AP) Computer Science PrinciplesSee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9067Advanced Placement (AP) Computer science ASee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9068International Baccalaureate (IB) Information technology in a Global SocietySee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9069International Baccalaureate (IB) Computer scienceSee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9080DanceDance courses typically cover the artistic processes, choreography and performance of various kinds of dances, including but not limited to ballet, modern, jazz, ethnic, and folk dance. Courses are designed to enable students to achieve dance literacy. Students will develop specific knowledge, skills, and values that allow for fluency and deep understanding of dance. This includes discovering the expressive elements of dance; knowing the dance-based theory, terminology, and symbolic language that is used to comprehend dance; having a clear sense of embodying dance; and being able to reflect, critique, and connect personal experience to dance and the professional dance community. Students will explore and discover their personal connection to the deep human tradition that is dance and prepare them for a life-long immersion in the socio-cultural-political meanings and experience of dance as well as the learning and enjoyment that performing, studying, and viewing dance brings.
9081International Baccalaureate (IB) DanceSee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9082College Credit Course - DanceCollege dance courses typically cover dance courses that are taken by a student in which the student earns college credit (dual or concurrent enrollment). This course may also count toward the high school graduation requirements (i.e., the student receives both college credit and high school credit). This is not an Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) course (AP and IB courses have their own Course Group State Codes).
9083Pre-AP DanceSee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9090TheatreTheatre courses typically cover production, performance, stage technique, voice, stage design, costuming, properties, and theater history. Students create plays or scenes and perform them from scripts or with improvised dialogue and action. Students may take part in pantomime, dialogue, monologue, improvisation, and role-playing.
9091Theatre Arts/Film: History, Literature, and AppreciationTheatre/Film History and Literature and History/appreciation of Theatre Arts and Film courses typically cover the history and development of theatre across time and culture, the artistic elements of responding and connecting through examination of historical texts and theatrical literature. Students acquire an understanding of theatre/film as a communications tool and its dynamic role in cultural development. This course is for students who desire knowledge in the history of drama, plays, Theatre, and writers. The course may include the study of outstanding examples in the fields of motion pictures, radio, and television. The course includes instruction in reading, writing, critique processes, and research.
9092Media/Film/Video/Television ProductionMedia/Film/Video/Television Production courses typically cover the history, conventions, and technology used to create and capture performance on digital media, including basics of camera operation, framing and composition, use of time, space, lighting, and sound to effectively translate theatrical content to digital media. Students apply their knowledge and skills in theatrical performance or production to the presentation of those skills in a digital media format.
9093International Baccalaureate (IB) FilmSee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9094International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme (IB MYP) DramaSee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/middle-years-programme/curriculum/.
9095International Baccalaureate (IB) TheatreSee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9096College Credit Course - TheatreCollege theatre courses typically cover any theatre courses that are taken by a student in which the student earns college credit (dual or concurrent enrollment). This course may also count toward the high school graduation requirements (i.e., the student receives both college credit and high school credit). This is not an Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) course (AP and IB courses have their own Course Group State Codes).
9097Pre-AP TheatreSee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9100English (Departmentalized K-8)English courses typically cover topics that build upon the students' prior knowledge of grammar, vocabulary, word usage, and the mechanics of writing. English language arts courses present students the opportunity to write persuasive and creative multi-paragraph thematic essays and compositions, and develop literary analysis skills. English courses introduce students to various genres of literature through writing exercises often linked to the reading selections. In upper-level courses students write essays and learn the techniques of writing research papers. English courses also include supports appropriate for English learners and for students with special needs.
9101ReadingReading courses typically cover topics such as reading silently or aloud, vocabulary development, comprehension, fluent decoding, reading/writing connections, text-based collaboration, self-directed learning, and student motivation. Reading courses present students with the opportunity to accelerate growth in reading ability, through motivational factors such as interest, relevance, identity, and self-efficacy. Reading course content depends on students' abilities entering the course
9102Expository Reading and WritingExpository Reading and Writing Courses (ERWC) (developed by the California State University system) typically cover topics that prepare students for success in postsecondary reading, writing, and thinking. ERWC courses present students the opportunity to read, analyze, and write expository and persuasive texts in a systematic and structured process that includes critical reading, rhetorical analysis, and frequent writing tasks. ERWC lessons are designed using a standard assignment template that is both comprehensive and flexible, deploying effective pedagogy informed by current research.
9103English SupportEnglish support courses typically cover topics such as basic language skills and integrate reading, writing, speaking, and listening while emphasizing individual student progress. English support courses present students with the opportunity to build upon their vocabulary, spelling and grammar, writing and composition, reading silently or aloud, and improving listening and comprehension skills. English support courses may take place in a laboratory setting or resource center and course content depends on the student's abilities entering the course.
9104English Language DevelopmentEnglish Language Development courses typically cover topics such as basic structures, forms, and functions of the English language. English Language Development courses present students with the opportunity to participate in extensive listening and speaking exercises. Designated English Language Development instruction is provided during a time set aside in the regular school day for focused instruction on the state-adopted English Language Development (ELD) standards.
9105English 9English 9 courses typically cover topics that build students' skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening. English 9 courses present students with the opportunity to comprehend and evaluate complex texts across a range of types and disciplines, construct effective arguments in writing and speaking, and convey understanding as warranted by the task. English 9 courses also include supports appropriate for English learners and for students with special needs.
9106English 10English 10 courses typically cover topics such as the study of fiction and non-fiction literature, argumentative writing, as well as creating multi-paragraph thematic essays and compositions. English 10 courses present students with the opportunity to improve their reading comprehension and knowledge acquisition, develop the skills to determine the purposes and themes of authors, and to recognize the techniques employed by authors to achieve their goals. English 10 courses also include supports appropriate for English learners and for students with special needs.
9107English 11English 11 courses typically cover topics that continue to develop students' writing skills, emphasizing clear, logical writing patterns, word choice, and usage, as students write and revise essays and learn the techniques of writing research papers. English 11 courses present students with the opportunity to continue to read, analyze, and question complex works of literature and other written materials that often form the backbone of the writing assignments. In English 11 courses, students' argumentative writing use precise, knowledgeable claims and counter claims. English 11 courses also include supports appropriate for English learners and for students with special needs.
9108English 12English 12 courses typically cover topics that continue to develop students' mastery of writing skills, emphasizing clear, logical writing patterns, word choice, and usage. English 12 courses present students with the opportunity to write and revise critical and comparative analyses of classic and contemporary literature, literary non-fiction, non-fiction, and other genres. In English 12 courses, students will demonstrate knowledge of research techniques, including a sophisticated use of argument, evidence, and effective counter claims. English 12 courses also include supports appropriate for English learners and for students with special needs.
9109JournalismJournalism courses typically cover topics that prepare students for work on news media publications by fostering habits of clear, concise, written expression and by developing the ability to write interestingly and appropriately for a variety of media. Journalism courses present students with the opportunity to improve their use of grammar, spelling, punctuation, sentence and paragraph form, style, and structure for print, electronic, and/or broadcast journalism, and offers basic training in techniques of interviewing and news writing. Journalism courses also foster a critical attitude toward news and develops the ability to evaluate the worth of publications through wide and intelligent readings of newspapers, periodicals, and other relevant sources.
9110SpeechSpeech courses typically cover topics such as the fundamentals of effective oral delivery such as voice, diction, poise, and ease in formal and informal situations. Speech courses present students with the opportunity to build on others’ ideas and learn to express their own clearly and persuasively, evaluate point of view, develop effective presentation of one’s voice and body, and use evidence and rhetoric as well as use digital media and visual displays of data strategically to express information and enhance understanding. Speech courses may also include instruction in parliamentary procedure, discussion, debate, radio broadcast, dramatic interpretation, and oral interpretation.
9111CompositionComposition courses typically cover topics such as expository writing, logical development and statement of thought, and the refinement of basic writing skills. Composition courses present students with the opportunity to analyze literature and improve their writing skills. Students compose papers using the descriptive, narrative, persuasive, or expository mode.
9112Literature ElectiveElective Literature courses typically cover representative works of a particular genre or a specific theme or works of a particular era of literature. Elective Literature courses present students with the opportunity to improve their critical thinking skills as they determine the underlying assumptions and values presented in literary works. Oral discussion and written composition are integral parts of the course emphasis.
9113International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme (IB MYP) Language AcquisitionSee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/middle-years-programme/curriculum/.
9114International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme (IB MYP) Language and Literature (English)See full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/middle-years-programme/curriculum/.
9115International Baccalaureate (IB) Literature and Performance SLSee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9116International Baccalaureate (IB) Language A: Language and Literature (English)See full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9117International Baccalaureate (IB) Language A: LiteratureSee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9118Advanced Placement (AP) English Literature and CompositionSee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9119Advanced Placement (AP) English Language and CompositionSee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9120College Credit Course - EnglishCollege English courses typically cover any English courses that are taken by a student in which the student earns college credit (dual or concurrent enrollment). This course may also count toward the high school graduation requirements (i.e., the student receives both college credit and high school credit). This is not an Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) course (AP and IB courses have their own Course Group State Codes).
9121Pre-AP English 1See full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9130World Languages IWorld Languages I courses typically cover topics that allow students to lay the foundation of their proficiency in the areas of speaking, listening, reading, and writing of the target language for beginning World Language I courses present students with the opportunity to acquire the ability to use a language for real-world purposes in culturally-appropriate ways. World Language I courses are considered introductory courses aligned with the most current World Languages Standards.
9131World Languages IIWorld Languages II courses typically cover topics that allow students to continue to develop linguistic and cultural proficiency for real-world purposes. World Languages II courses present students with the opportunity to increase their proficiency in the areas of speaking, listening, reading, and writing of the target language. World Language II courses are a level beyond introductory courses and are aligned with the most current World Languages Standards. Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) courses have discrete codes and are not included in this category.
9132World Languages IIIWorld Languages III courses typically cover topics that allow students to increase their proficiency in the areas of speaking, listening, reading, and writing of the target language. World Languages III courses present students with the opportunity to continue to develop linguistic and cultural proficiency for real-world purposes. World Languages III courses are a level beyond intermediate and are aligned with the most current World Languages Standards. Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) courses have discrete codes and are not included in this category.
9133World Languages IVWorld Languages IV courses typically cover topics that allow students to continue to develop linguistic and cultural proficiency for real-world purposes. World Languages IV courses present students with the opportunity to increase their proficiency in the areas of speaking, listening, reading, and writing of the target language. World Language IV course are advanced level courses aligned with the most current World Languages Standards. Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) courses have discrete codes and are not included in this category.
9134World Languages for Native Speakers IWorld Language for Native Speakers I courses typically cover topics that support, reinforce, and build upon students' existing knowledge and skills in using their primary language for real-world purposes in culturally-appropriate ways. World Language for Native Speakers I courses present students with the opportunity to develop academic proficiency in speaking, listening, reading and writing the target language, and on cultural comparison and competence. These courses are aligned with the most current World Languages Standards, and is designed for native, or heritage, speakers of a language other than English.
9135World Languages for Native Speakers IIWorld Language for Native Speakers II courses typically cover topics that support, reinforce and build upon students' existing knowledge and skills in using their primary language for real-world purposes in culturally-appropriate ways. World Language for Native Speakers II courses present students with the opportunity to develop academic proficiency in speaking, listening, reading and writing the target language, and on cultural comparison and competence. These courses are aligned with the most current World Languages Standards at a level beyond introductory, and are designed for native, or heritage, speakers of a language other than English.
9136World Languages for Native Speakers IIIWorld Language for Native Speakers III courses typically cover topics that support, reinforce and build upon students' existing knowledge and skills in using their primary language for real-world purposes in culturally-appropriate ways. World Language for Native Speakers III courses present students with the opportunity to develop academic proficiency in speaking, listening, reading and writing the target language, and on cultural comparison and competence. These courses are aligned with the most current World Languages Standards at a level beyond intermediate, and are designed for native, or heritage, speakers of a language other than English.
9137World Languages for Native Speakers IVWorld Language for Native Speakers IV courses typically cover topics that support, reinforce and build upon students' existing knowledge and skills in using their primary language for real-world purposes in culturally-appropriate ways. World Language for Native Speakers IV courses present students with the opportunity to develop academic proficiency in speaking, listening, reading and writing the target language, and on cultural comparison and competence. These courses are aligned with the most current World Languages Standards at an advanced level, and are designed for native, or heritage, speakers of a language other than English.
9138International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme (IB MYP) Language Acquisition (Non-English)See full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/middle-years-programme/curriculum/.
9139International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme (IB MYP) Language and Literature (non-English)See full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/middle-years-programme/curriculum/.
9140International Baccalaureate (IB) Literature and Performance SL (non-English)See full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9141International Baccalaureate (IB) Language A: Language and Literature (non-English)See full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9142International Baccalaureate (IB) Language A: Literature (non-English)See full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9143International Baccalaureate (IB) Language BSee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9144International Baccalaureate (IB) Language ab initioSee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9145International Baccalaureate (IB) Classical LanguagesSee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9146Advanced Placement (AP) Japanese Language and CultureSee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9147Advanced Placement (AP) Chinese Language and CultureSee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9148Advanced Placement (AP) Italian Language and CultureSee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9149Advanced Placement (AP) Spanish Literature and CultureSee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9150Advanced Placement (AP) Spanish Language and CultureSee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9151Advanced Placement (AP) Latin See full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9152Advanced Placement (AP) German Language and CultureSee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9153Advanced Placement (AP) French Language and CultureSee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9154College Credit Course - World LanguagesCollege world language courses typically cover any world language courses that are taken by a student in which the student earns college credit (dual or concurrent enrollment). This course may also count toward the high school graduation requirements (i.e., the student receives both college credit and high school credit). This is not an Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) course (AP and IB courses have their own Course Group State Codes).
9155Elementary or Middle School World LanguageMiddle school world languages courses typically cover topics that allow students to lay the foundation of their proficiency in the areas of speaking, listening, reading, and writing of the target language. Middle school world language courses present students with the opportunity to acquire the ability to use a language for real-world purposes in culturally-appropriate ways. This course would not count as “a-g” world language (high school) credit.
9156World Languages VWorld Languages V courses typically cover topics that allow students to continue to develop linguistic and cultural proficiency for real-world purposes. World Languages IV courses present students with the opportunity to increase their proficiency in the areas of speaking, listening, reading, and writing of the target language. World Language V course are advanced level courses aligned with the most current World Languages Standards. Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) courses have discrete codes and are not included in this category.
9157World Languages for Native Speakers VWorld Language for Native Speakers V courses typically cover topics that support, reinforce and build upon students' existing knowledge and skills in using their primary language for real-world purposes in culturally-appropriate ways. World Language for Native Speakers V courses present students with the opportunity to develop academic proficiency in speaking, listening, reading and writing the target language, and on cultural comparison and competence. These courses are aligned with the most current World Languages Standards at an advanced level, and are designed for native, or heritage, speakers of a language other than English.
9160Comprehensive Health EducationComprehensive Health Education courses typically cover topics related to two or more of the six content areas of health education, as defined in the Health Education Content Standards: nutrition and physical activity; growth, development, and sexual health; injury prevention and safety; alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs; mental, emotional, and social health; and personal and community health. Comprehensive Health Education courses present students with the opportunity to develop the with knowledge and skills as required in the California Healthy Youth Act (Education Code §§ 51930-51939). The California Healthy Youth Act requires that students in grades 7-12 receive comprehensive sexual health education and HIV prevention education at least once in middle school and once in high school.
9161Comprehensive Sexual Health Education Comprehensive Sexual Health Education courses typically cover topics that provide students with knowledge and skills as required in the California Healthy Youth Act (Education Code §§ 51930-51939). Comprehensive Sexual Health Education courses present students with the opportunity to build their knowledge of the topics required in California Healthy Youth Act including comprehensive sexual health education and HIV prevention education at least once in middle school and once in high school.
9170History-Social Science (Departmentalized K-6) Departmentalized History-Social Science courses typically cover the content outlined by grade level in the California History-Social Science Standards. Departmentalized history-social science courses present students with the opportunity to study significant people, events, developments and political movements of a specific era of time. In these courses, the instructor may teach specific content to several different groups of students during multiple classes throughout the day.
9171World GeographyWorld Geography courses typically cover topics such as physical geography, map reading, and studies of various regions of the world. World Geography courses present an opportunity for students to develop an understanding of the distribution and characteristics of the world's major cultures and of the dynamics of human migration and cultural diffusion and of the constraints and possibilities that the physical environment places on human development.
9172World HistoryWorld History courses typically cover topics such as the socio-economic, political, and ideological conditions of various time periods as well as significant historical events and cultural achievements of world regions. World History courses present students with the opportunity to learn about the achievements of civilizations and countries, particularly in the fields of science, technology, and the arts, and how they spread through cultural diffusion. Students will compare and contrast the development and beliefs of the major world religions, explain how they spread to other regions, and resulted in ideological conflicts throughout history.
9173United States HistoryUnited States History courses typically cover major turning points in American history and emphasize specific themes, such as the expanding role of the federal government and federal courts; the continuing tension between the individual and the state and between minority rights and majority power; and the emergence of a modern economy. United States history courses present students with the opportunity to study the impact of technology on American society and culture; change in the ethnic composition of American society; the movements toward equal rights for racial minorities and women; and the development of the United States as a world power.
9174Government/CivicsGovernment/Civics courses typically cover topics such as Constitution and the Bill of Rights; the Courts and the Governmental Process; Our Government Today; the Legislative and Executive Branches; Federalism; and State and Local Government. Government/Civics courses present students with an opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of the institutions of American government and prepare students to vote, to reflect on the responsibilities of citizenship, and to participate in community activities.
9175EconomicsEconomics courses typically cover fundamental economic concepts, comparative economic systems, microeconomics, macroeconomics, and international economic concepts. Economics courses present students with an opportunity to deepen their understanding of the basic economic problems and institutions of the nation and world in which they live and make reasoned decisions on economic issues as citizens, workers, consumers, business owners and managers, and members of civic groups.
9176SociologySociology courses typically cover topics such as how sociologists analyze the basic structures and functions of societies and of groups within societies, discover how these societies became organized, identify the conditions under which they become disorganized, and predict the conditions for their reorganization. Sociology courses present students with the opportunity to study sociological concepts, theories, and procedures.
9177PsychologyPsychology courses typically cover topics such as the scientific study of human development, cognitive and social development, motivation, and personality. Psychology courses present students with the opportunity to study data collection and sampling methods as well as ethical issues for the field of psychology.
9178PhilosophyPhilosophy courses typically cover topics such as the major questions in the fields of epistemology, axiology, aesthetics, logic, and metaphysics. Philosophy courses present students with the opportunity to discuss, explore, and evaluate important philosophical systems, such as materialism, idealism, naturalism, mysticism, pragmatism, institutionalism, realism, and existentialism. The course emphasizes the field of ethics where moral questions are analyzed in literature, history, and contemporary events.
9179Ethnic StudiesEthnic studies courses typically cover an in-depth study of one or more ethnic groups, including their history, culture, achievements, contributions, barriers and strategies to overcome these barriers, and status in the United States. Ethnic studies courses present students with an opportunity to learn about the characteristics of America's ethnic groups and the similarities and differences of these groups in both their past and present experiences from multiple perspectives. Students learn that Americans, as descendants of many cultures, races, religions, and ethnic groups are bonded by a democratic vision of liberty, equality, and justice.
9180History-Social Science ElectiveHistory-social science elective courses typically cover topics outside of district requirements for graduation and/or "a-g" requirements and may include the study of a certain time period, genre or event (1960s, Women's History, Civil War etc.), comparative study of religions or political systems, or cultures. History-Social Science elective courses present students with the opportunity to participate in mock trial, mock United Nations courses and may also include the study of a movement (Civil Rights) or specific topic (music, baseball, etc.) in United States or World History.
9181International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme (IB MYP) Humanities (history and/or geography)See full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/middle-years-programme/curriculum/.
9182International Baccalaureate (IB) Theory of KnowledgeSee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9183International Baccalaureate (IB) Social and Cultural AnthropologySee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9184International Baccalaureate (IB) PhilosophySee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9185International Baccalaureate (IB) PsychologySee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9186International Baccalaureate (IB) HistorySee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9187International Baccalaureate (IB) GeographySee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9188International Baccalaureate (IB) EconomicsSee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9189International Baccalaureate (IB) Global PoliticsSee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9190International Baccalaureate (IB) World Religions SLSee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9191Advanced Placement (AP) World HistorySee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9192Advanced Placement (AP) Human GeographySee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9193Advanced Placement (AP) PsychologySee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9194Advanced Placement (AP) United States HistorySee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9195Advanced Placement (AP) European HistorySee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9196Advanced Placement (AP) United States Government & PoliticsSee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9197Advanced Placement (AP) Comparative Government & PoliticsSee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9198Advanced Placement (AP) MicroeconomicsSee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9199Advanced Placement (AP) MacroeconomicsSee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9200College Credit Course - History/Social ScienceCollege history/social science courses typically cover any history/social science courses that are taken by a student in which the student earns college credit (dual or concurrent enrollment). This course may also count toward the high school graduation requirements (i.e., the student receives both college credit and high school credit). This is not an Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) course (AP and IB courses have their own Course Group State Codes).
9201Pre-AP World History and GeographySee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9210Academic DecathlonAcademic Decathlon courses typically covers content across seven different subject areas: art, economics, literature, math, music, science, and social science. Academic Decathlon courses present students with an opportunity to compete against their peers in local, state, and national events.
9211A.V.I.D. Advancement via Individual DeterminationAdvancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) courses typically cover topics such as note-taking, organization, inquiry, writing, and time-management. AVID courses present lower-achieving students with the opportunity to gain additional tutoring and support to take college preparation courses to make them eligible for entry into a four-year college upon graduation.
9212Community ServiceCommunity Service courses typically cover topics that ask students to define community service and civic responsibility, track service hours, reflect on services performed and may include a final project or product. Community Service courses present students with the opportunity to volunteer for a non-profit organization to make a different in their community.
9213Teen ParentingTeen parenting courses typically cover topics such as the realities of being a parent, understanding child development, and promoting healthy parent-child relationships. Teen Parenting courses present students with an opportunity to developing their parenting skills and assist their children in meeting developmental milestones.
9214(Teacher Librarian) Information and Digital Literacy and Digital CitizenshipInformation and Digital Literacy and Digital Citizenship courses typically cover topics such as accessing, evaluating, use, and integrating information and ideas found in print, media, and digital resources effectively, that enable students to function in a knowledge-based economy and technologically oriented society. Information and Digital Literacy and Digital Citizenship courses present students with the opportunity to gain an understanding of the ethical, legal and safe use of information and technology including: respect for copyright, intellectual property, and the appropriate documentation of sources. This course can be taught in a departmentalized (with a supplemental authorization) or pull-out setting. This course is taught by a teacher librarian.
9215Free period or No Educational ContentA period where a student is not receiving any educational instruction or content and may even be allowed to leave the school campus.
9216Teacher Preparation/Student AssistantA period where a teacher prepares lesson plans and curricular activities but does not provide instruction to students. Although some teachers may have a student assistant during this class period, the student is not receiving educational content for which they would receive credit towards graduation. In other scenarios, there is no designated teacher and the student is only providing assistance to the school office or other administrative staff.
9217Homeroom, study hallA classroom in which all students in a particular grade (or in a division of a grade) meet at certain times under the supervision of a teacher who takes attendance and does other administrative business.
9218Skills Center/Study Skills/College ReadinessSkills Center/Study Skills/College Readiness courses typically cover topics such as time management, outlining, note taking, organization, active listening, research methods and test-taking strategies. Skills Center/Study Skills/College Readiness courses present students with the opportunity to gain extra academic support and guidance to help students achieve success in their academic work both at the secondary and postsecondary levels.
9219Student GovernmentStudent Government courses typically cover topics that allow students to practice small group government in a school setting. Student Government courses present students with the opportunity to represent the entire student body by sponsoring and organizing activities that range from service projects to semi-formal dances
9220Life SkillsLife Skills courses typically cover topics such as defining personal values, goal-setting and planning, making decisions and solving problems, evaluating information and dealing with media and peer pressure, communication and relationships, decision making, wellness and personal safety, and contributing to your community. Life Skills courses present students with an opportunity to increase student knowledge and ability in skills necessary for everyday living.
9221Peer Counseling/Conflict ManagementPeer Counseling/Conflict Management courses typically cover topics that provide students with skills in conflict resolution. Peer Counseling/Conflict Management courses present students with the opportunity to mediate disagreements through nonviolent means and learn the importance of a neutral third party who can assist in negotiating a solution to any potential conflict.
9222Applied Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)Applied Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) courses typically cover topics that educate students in four specific disciplines — science, technology, engineering and mathematics — in an interdisciplinary and applied approach. STEM courses present students with the opportunity to apply their knowledge in hands-on activities.
9223HumanitiesHumanities courses typically cover the study of beliefs, thoughts, and traditions of humankind as reflected in history, philosophy, religion, dance, music, theater, and the visual arts. Humanities courses present students with the opportunity to develop an understanding of the connection among the arts and their historical and cultural context.
9224YearbookYearbook courses typically cover topics that assist students in understanding design elements, planning coverage of annual events, developing a theme, journalistic features and photography in school yearbooks. Yearbook courses present students with an opportunity to produce a book that captures the moments of the year's events at their school sites.
9225Advanced Placement (AP) ResearchSee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9226Advanced Placement (AP) SeminarSee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9227College Credit Course - OtherOther college credit courses typically cover any other interdisciplinary academic courses that are taken by a student in which the student earns college credit (dual or concurrent enrollment). This course may also count toward the high school graduation requirements (i.e., the student receives both college credit and high school credit). This is not an Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) course (AP and IB courses have their own Course Group State Codes).
9228Non-Core Academic ElectiveNon-core elective courses typically cover topics that are outside of the core subject areas of math, science, English, and history-social science. Non-core elective courses present students with the opportunity to explore a variety of topics and experience enrichment activities. Students enrolled in non-core electives do not earn credit in the core instructional areas. Examples may include chess, etc.)
9229Social-Emotional LearningSocial Emotional Learning courses typically cover topics such as: self-awareness, impulse control, empathy, teamwork, and responsible decision-making. Social Emotional Learning courses present students with the opportunity to develop habits of self-discipline, Implement time management skills, plan for personal growth outside the classroom, identify their unique strengths and develop a healthy self-image.
9230Response to Intervention (RTI)/Multi-tiered Systems of Support (MTSS)Response to Intervention (RTI) /Multi-tiered Systems of Support (MTSS) courses typically cover topics that provide struggling learners with interventions at increasing levels of intensity to accelerate their rate of learning. RTI/MTSS courses present students with the opportunity to receive the specialized support that they need for academic success. Students will likely move in and out of RTI/MTSS courses depending on what skills and concepts are being taught.
9231Special Education Support-Resource Specialist Program (RSP)Special Education Support-Resource Specialist Program (RSP) courses typically cover topics that support special education students to be successful in a grade-level academic courses. Special education support courses present students with the opportunity to receive additional instruction to assist them in their regular academic courses.
9232Home EconomicsHome economics courses typically cover topics such as food and nutrition, clothing, textiles, and interior design, human development, and financial management. Home economics courses present students with the opportunity to develop skills necessary to manage a household.
9233Mathematics Engineering Science Achievement (MESA) Mathematics Engineering Science Achievement (MESA) courses typically cover topics that foster early interest in math and science and prepares California middle and high school students for college in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) majors. MESA courses present students with the opportunity to create STEM projects, participate in competitions, and explore STEM careers.
9240Math (Departmentalized K-8)Math (Departmentalized K-8) typically cover topics such as arithmetic using rational numbers, the numeration systems, simple data analysis, and place value. In higher grades the course may include basic algebra, basic geometry, and basic statistics, concepts of rate and ratio. Math (Departmentalized K-8) courses present students with the opportunity to reinforce concepts and skills in mathematics and apply these skills to real world problems and situations.
9241Integrated Mathematics IIntegrated Mathematics I courses typically cover topics that combine the basic principles of algebra, geometry, and statistics and probability. Integrated Mathematics I courses present students with the opportunity to extend their understanding of numerical manipulation to algebraic manipulation; synthesize understanding of function; deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential relationships; solving problems involving systems of equations and inequalities; apply linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend; establish criteria for congruence based on rigid motions; and apply the Pythagorean Theorem to the coordinate plane.
9242Integrated Mathematics IIIntegrated Mathematics II integrates topics and concepts in algebra and geometry. These courses typically cover topics such as quadratic expressions, equations, and functions and compare their characteristics and behavior to those of linear and exponential relationships learned in Integrated Mathematics I. Integrated Mathematics II courses present students with the opportunity to develop their knowledge to extend the laws of exponents to rational exponents; create and solve equations and inequalities involving linear, exponential, and quadratic expressions; extend work with statistics and probability; and establish criteria for similarity of triangles based on dilations and proportional reasoning.
9243Integrated Mathematics IIIIntegrated Mathematics III courses integrate topics and concepts in algebra and geometry. Typically these courses cover topics that extend their knowledge of algebra and functions (including radicals, rational expressions, polynomial functions, logarithmic functions, sequences and series), trigonometry, and statistics and probability. Integrated Mathematics III courses present students with the opportunity to apply methods from probability and statistics to draw inferences and conclusions from data; expand their understanding of functions to include polynomial, rational, and radical functions; perform arithmetic operations with functions; expand right triangle trigonometry to include general triangles; and consolidate functions and geometry to create models and solve contextual problems.
9244Integrated Mathematics IVIntegrated Mathematics IV courses typically integrate topics and concepts in algebra and geometry. These courses cover topics such as advanced geometry, advanced algebra, probability and statistics and the modeling standards (indicated by a star in the California Common Core State Standards, Mathematics) and the more advanced standards (indicated by a plus symbol).
9245Foundational Math SupportFoundational Math Support courses typically occur in parallel to the core math course. These courses typically cover foundational topics such as basic skills with whole numbers and rational numbers, algebraic reasoning, and other topics that are foundational to the core course. Math support also provides scaffolding for students who are presented with new concepts in their core math course. Math Support courses present opportunities for students struggling in math to obtain targeted small group instruction and assistance to meet grade level expectations.
9246Higher Math SupportHigher Math Support courses typically occur in parallel to the core mathematics course (geometry or higher). These courses typically cover topics such as algebra, calculus, consumer mathematics, geometry, mathematical analysis, statistics and probability, and trigonometry, and other topics that are foundational to the core course. Math support also provides scaffolding for students who are presented with new concepts in their core math course. Math Support courses present opportunities for students struggling in math to obtain targeted small group instruction and assistance to meet grade level expectations.
9247Math AnalysisMath Analysis courses typically cover topics such as polar coordinates, vectors, complex numbers, limits, mathematical induction, fundamental theorem of algebra, conic sections, rational functions, and functions and equations defined parametrically. Math Analysis courses present students with opportunities to strengthen their conceptual understanding of problems and mathematical reasoning in solving problems and introduces the new concept of limits.
9248Pre-AlgebraPre-Algebra courses typically cover topics such as exponents and radicals, the rectangular coordinate system, sets, logic formulas, and solving first-degree equations and inequalities. Pre-Algebra courses present students with the opportunity to obtain an extra year of study for students who have attained standard mathematics objectives, but are not ready to enter algebra.
9249Algebra IAlgebra I courses typically cover topics such as a linear, quadratic, and exponential expressions and functions as well as some work with absolute value and step-wise functions. Algebra I courses present students with the opportunity to deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential relationships; contrast linear, quadratic, and exponential relationships with each other and engage in methods for analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions; extend the laws of exponents to square and cube roots; and apply linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend.
9250Algebra IAAlgebra IA courses typically cover topics such as symbolic reasoning, calculating with symbols, the properties and operations of the real numbers, solving and graphing linear equations and inequalities, and absolute value. Algebra IA courses present students with the opportunities to develop their algebraic skills and concepts and use them in a wide variety of problem-solving situations. This course is considered the first year of a two-year Algebra I course.
9251Algebra IBAlgebra IB courses typically cover topics such as real numbers, systems of linear equations and inequalities as well as linear, quadratic, exponential, and rational equations and functions, solving and graphing quadratic functions, and quadratic equations. Algebra IB courses present students with the opportunities to develop their algebraic skills and concepts and use them in a wide variety of problem-solving situations. This course is considered the second year of a two-year Algebra I course.
9252Algebra IIAlgebra II courses typically cover topics that allow students to build on their work with linear, quadratic, and exponential functions, and extend their knowledge of functions to include logarithmic, polynomial, rational, and radical functions. Algebra II courses present students with opportunities to relate arithmetic of rational expressions to arithmetic of rational numbers; expand understandings of functions and graphing to include trigonometric functions; synthesize and generalize functions and extend understanding of exponential functions to logarithmic functions; and relate data display and summary statistics to probability and explore a variety of data collection methods
9253Algebra II and TrigonometryAlgebra II and Trigonometry courses integrate intermediate algebra and trigonometry and typically include topics such as field properties and theorems, set theory, operations with rational and irrational expressions, and factoring of rational expressions. Algebra II and Trigonometry courses present students with opportunities to do an in-depth study of linear equations and inequalities, graphing of constants, linear and quadratic equations, properties of higher degree equations, operations with rational and irrational exponents, right trigonometric and circular functions, inverses and graphs, trigonometric identities and equations, solutions of right and oblique triangles, complex numbers; and numerical tables.
9254Algebra - FinancialAlgebra - Financial courses typically cover topics such as investments, the stock market, business start-ups, banking, credit cards, insurance, income taxes, business planning, home buying, and budgeting are the major areas of finance included in the course. Algebra-Financial courses present students with the opportunity to explore and master mathematical concepts and skills such as data analysis, fitting data to equations, linear, quadratic, exponential, and piecewise models, interest formulas, and present and future value.
9255GeometryGeometry courses typically cover topics that develop students' knowledge in establishing criteria for congruence of triangles based on rigid motions; establishing criteria for similarity of triangles based on dilations and proportional reasoning; informally developing explanations of circumference, area, and volume formulas; applying the Pythagorean Theorem to the coordinate plane; proving basic geometric theorems; and extending work with probability. Geometry courses present students with the opportunity to explore more complex geometric situations and deepen their explanations of geometric relationships, as well as present and hear formal mathematical arguments.
9256TrigonometryTrigonometry courses typically cover topics such as radian measure; unit circle; trigonometric identities; graphs of trigonometric functions and their inverse; polar coordinates; and complex numbers. Trigonometry courses present students with the opportunity to apply problem solving techniques to measure angles and distances indirectly and to establish mathematical relationships dealing with triangles.
9257Pre-CalculusPre-Calculus courses typically include topics such as coordinate geometry with analytical methods and proofs, equations and graphs of conic sections, rectangular and polar coordinates, parametric equations, and vectors. Pre-Calculus courses present students with the opportunity to develop their knowledge of polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and rational functions and their graphs; induction; limits and rate change; continuity; and problem analysis.
9258Calculus (Non-Advanced Placement)Calculus courses typically cover topics such as the study of derivatives, differential equations, the definite and indefinite integral, anti-derivatives and applications of calculus. Typically, students have previously attained knowledge of pre-calculus topics (some combination of trigonometry, elementary functions, analytic geometry, and math analysis).
9259Probability and Statistics (Non-Advanced Placement)Probability and Statistics courses typically cover topics such as independent events, conditional probability, discrete random variables; standard distributions; mean, median, and mode; variance and standard deviation; and data organization. Probability and Statistics Courses present students with the opportunity to get an introduction to the study of probability, interpretation of data, and fundamental statistical problem solving and gain a solid foundation in probability theory and calculations and processing statistical information.
9260Consumer MathConsumer Math courses typically cover topics such as budgeting, taxation, credit, banking service, insurance, buying and selling products and services, home and/or car ownership and rental, managing personal income, and investment. Consumer Math courses present students with the opportunity to reinforce basic mathematics skills and link those skills to consumer applications.
9261International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme (IB MYP) Algebra IISee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/middle-years-programme/curriculum/.
9262International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme (IB MYP) Integrated Math ProgramSee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/middle-years-programme/curriculum/.
9263International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme (IB MYP) Geometry and/or TrigonometrySee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/middle-years-programme/curriculum/.
9264International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme (IB MYP) Algebra ISee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/middle-years-programme/curriculum/.
9265International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme (IB MYP) Coordinated Program of MathSee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/middle-years-programme/curriculum/.
9266Advanced Placement (AP) StatisticsSee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9267Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus BCSee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9268Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus ABSee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9269International Baccalaureate (IB) Further Mathematics HLSee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9270International Baccalaureate (IB) Mathematics higher levelSee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9271International Baccalaureate (IB) Mathematics SLSee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9272International Baccalaureate (IB) Mathematical Studies SLSee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9273College Credit Course - MathematicsCollege mathematics courses typically cover any mathematics courses that are taken by a student in which the student earns college credit (dual or concurrent enrollment). This course may also count toward the high school graduation requirements (i.e., the student receives both college credit and high school credit). This is not an Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) course (AP and IB courses have their own Course Group State Codes).
9274Pre-Calculus and TrigonometryTrigonometry/Pre-Calculus courses typically cover topics such as right-triangle relationships, the unit circle, inverse trig functions, vectors, nonlinear systems, matrices, polynomial and rational functions, logarithmic and exponential functions, limits, continuity, and derivatives. Trigonometry/pre-calculus courses present students with the opportunity to explore the relationship between advanced algebra topics and geometry to establish a foundation for trigonometric concepts.
9275Integrated Mathematics IAIntegrated Mathematics IA courses typically cover topics that combine the basic principles of algebra, geometry, and statistics and probability. Integrated Mathematics IA courses present students with the opportunity to extend their understanding of numerical manipulation to algebraic manipulation; synthesize understanding of function; deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential relationships. This course is considered the first year of a two-year Integrated Mathematics I course.
9276Integrated Mathematics IBIntegrated Mathematics IB courses typically cover topics that combine the basic principles of algebra, geometry, and statistics and probability. Integrated Mathematics IB courses present students with the opportunity to solve problems involving systems of equations and inequalities; apply linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend; establish criteria for congruence based on rigid motions; and apply the Pythagorean Theorem to the coordinate plane. This course is considered the second year of a two-year Integrated Mathematics I course.
9277Compacted Middle School MathCompacted middle school math courses do not omit content and typically cover topics and standards that span more than one grade level (grades 5-8) and compact three years of content into two years of instruction. Compacted middle school math courses present students with the opportunity to excel through mathematics content at a faster pace allowing for their participation in advanced mathematics courses. The content of a compacted middle school math course does not exceed Geometry or Mathematics II.
9278Compacted High School MathCompacted high school math courses typically cover topics and standards that span three courses (grades 9-12) and compact the learning into two years of instruction. Compacted high school math courses present students with the opportunity to excel through mathematics content at a faster pace allowing for their participation in advanced mathematics courses including Advanced Placement Courses. The content of a compacted high school math course does not exceed Algebra II or Integrated Mathematics III.
9279Pre-AP Algebra ISee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9280Math Reasoning with Connections (MRWC)Math Reasoning with Connections (MRWC) courses typically cover topics that prepare students for the expectations and rigor of college mathematics courses. MRWC courses present students with the opportunity to reinforce and build on mathematical topics and skills developed in Integrated 1-3 (or Algebra 1-2 and Geometry) and is designed as a bridge to college mathematics courses required in either STEM and non-STEM majors. MRWC courses are designed to be fourth year high school mathematics courses.
9290Music General/Classroom/Exploratory (Departmentalized K-8)Music courses typically cover topics that regularly engage students in singing, playing instruments, and moving to music. Music courses present students with the opportunity to create, listen to, analyze, and evaluate music and music performances.
9291Music - Instrumental (Performance Based)Music--Instrumental (Performanced-based) courses typically cover topics such as the proper technique for posture, holding and playing an instrument, reading sheet music, scales and arpeggios. Music--Instrumental courses present students with an opportunity to demonstrate their learning through performances.
9292Music - Instrumental (Non-Performance Based)Music--Instrumental (Non-Performance Based) courses typically cover topics such as the proper technique for posture, holding and playing an instrument, reading sheet music, scales and arpeggios.
9293Music - Vocal (Performance-Based)Music--Vocal (Performance Based) courses typically cover topics such as proper vocal choral, choir and ensemble techniques, the elements of music, and choral music of different styles, cultures, and periods; it may include principals of musical theatre and appropriate acting within the musical theatre arena. Music-Vocal (Performance Based) courses present students with the opportunity to demonstrate their learning through performances. There may be several choral or ensemble groups at the same time, within the course of instruction.
9294Music - Vocal (Non-Performance-Based)Music--Vocal (Non-Performance Based) courses typically cover topics such as proper vocal choral, choir and ensemble techniques, the elements of music, and choral music of different styles, cultures, and periods; it may include principals of musical theatre and appropriate acting within the musical theatre arena. There may be several choral or ensemble groups at the same time, within the course of instruction.
9295Music appreciationMusic Appreciation courses typically include topics such as guided listening, analysis, discussion, and hands-on experimentation-including informal performance, improvisation, or composition-focused on how various styles of music apply musical elements to create expressive or aesthetic impact. Music Appreciation Courses present students with opportunities to develop an understanding of music and its importance in the music experience and/or their lives. Classes may include Music Survey, Music Appreciation, Music History, World Music, Music Literature, and music courses that focus on specific styles or genres of music (ex. Rock and Roll Music). This class does not normally perform as a group other than an end of course demonstration of learning. If the class performs on a regular basis, it should be coded under another vocal or instrumental performing ensembles course.
9296Musical TheatreMusical Theatre courses typically include topics that allow students to learn, practice, and perform vocal music techniques, principles of musical theatre, and acting techniques. Musical Theatre courses present students with the opportunity to learn, practice, and perform skills through performing examples of musical theatre, including, but not confined to, Broadway shows.
9297Music Technology/Electronic MusicMusic Technology/Electronic Music courses typically cover topics such as the history of electronic music with listening examples that highlight the important people, technology, and techniques associated with the style. Music Technology/Electronic Music courses present students with the opportunity to create original pieces of electronic music based on various styles studied in the course.
9298Music Recording and ProductionMusic Recording and Production course typically cover topics such as the foundations, practices, and creative techniques in audio recording and music production, including microphone selection and placement, mixing, mastering, signal processing, automation, and digital audio workstations. Music Recording and Production courses present students with the opportunity to learn and utilize the practical skills needed to record and mix songs in a professional studio.
9299Music Composition/SongwritingMusic Composition/Songwriting courses typically cover topics such as learning, analyzing, and applying the foundational and structural elements of songwriting. Music Composition/Songwriting courses present students with the opportunity to study various techniques of songwriting through the listening, analysis and performance of songs.
9300Advanced Placement (AP) Music TheorySee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9301International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme (IB MYP) MusicSee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/middle-years-programme/curriculum/.
9302International Baccalaureate (IB) MusicSee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9303College Credit Course - MusicCollege music courses typically cover any music courses that are taken by a student in which the student earns college credit (dual or concurrent enrollment). This course may also count toward the high school graduation requirements (i.e., the student receives both college credit and high school credit). This is not an Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) course (AP and IB courses have their own Course Group State Codes).
9304Pre-AP MusicSee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9310Physical Education (Departmentalized K-5)Physical education courses typically cover topics that allow students to develop their motor and non locomotor skills, and manipulative skills apply basic biomechanic and mortor learning principles and strategies to physical activities. Physical education courses present students with the importance and opportunities in physical activitiy and personal fitness.
9311Physical Education (Departmentalized 6-8)Physical education courses typically cover topics that allow students to develop and expand their motor skills and movement, by applying strategies, biomechanic, motor learning, and fitness principles to their participation in a variety of physical activities. Physical education courses provide students with the opportunity to improve their personal fitness by goal setting and participation in specific activities that lead to improved health.
9312Modified or Specially Designed Physical Education Grades 7-12Modified or Specially Designed Physical Education courses typically cover topics that allow students to develop and expand their motor skills and movement, by applying strategies, biomechanics, motor learning, and fitness principles to their participation in a variety of physical activities and instruction that are modified to specifically meet the unique needs of the student as stated in their IEP.
9313Adapted Physical EducationAdapted Physical Education courses typically include topics specifically designed to meet the unique needs of an individual with a disability who is unable to fully participate in the general, modified, or a specially designed physical education program. Students have an IEP to qualify for this course.
9314Physical Education IPhysical Education I courses typically cover topics such as aquatics, rhythms/dance, individual and dual activities, the mechanics of body movement, and the effects of fitness on dynamic health. This course is the first year of the high school physical education sequence.
9315Physical Education IIPhysical Education II courses typically cover topics such as gymnastics/tumbling, combatives, team sports, the mechanics of body movement, and the effects of fitness on dynamic health. This course is the second year of the high school foundation courses, it expands the content of course I and includes the remainder of the required content areas.
9316Elective Physical EducationElective Physical Education courses typically cover content for developing skills and knowledge in adventure/outdoor activities (rock climbing, kayaking, etc.). Elective Physical Education courses present students with the opportunity to explore physical activities that they enjoy or show interest in. This course is designed for students who have completed High School Physical Education Courses I and II.
9317International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme (IB MYP) Physical EducationSee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/middle-years-programme/curriculum/.
9320Science (Departmentalized K-6)This course combines more than one science domain into a cohesive study where students explore general scientific concepts. Topics include selected concepts from life, earth and physical sciences and may involve environmental contexts as unifying phenomena. This science course presents students with the opportunity to develop scientific reasoning skills through Science and Engineering Practices and Crosscutting Concepts.
9321Earth and Space SciencesEarth and space science courses typically cover topics associated with Earth's place in the universe, Earth's systems and Earth and human activity. Earth and space science courses present students with the opportunity to develop an understanding of processes that shape the world around them. This course also investigates how humans interact with the natural world by integrating California's Environmental Principles and Concepts. Geoscience is another name used to identify the course.
9322Life SciencesLife Science courses typically cover topics such as ecosystems, photosynthesis and respiration, cells and body systems, evolution, inheritance and genetics and natural selection. Life science courses present students with an opportunity to apply the principles of conservation, investigate interrelationships of organisms within ecosystems and develop environmental literacy.
9323Physical sciencesPhysical science courses typically cover topics such as matter, motion and forces, energy and waves. Physical science courses present students with the opportunity to study physical science through the lens of the transfer or conversion of energy. This course integrates engineering and envionmental principles into the study of the physical sciences.
9324BiologyBiology courses typically cover topics such as structure and function, inheritance and variation of traits, matter and energy in organisms and ecosystems, interdependent relationships in ecosystems, natural selection, evolution, adaptation and biodiversity. Biology courses present students with the opportunity to develop and use biological models, identify cause and effect and recognize human impacts on the natural world. This science course also presents students with the opportunity to develop scientific reasoning skills through Science and Engineering Practices and Crosscutting Concepts.
9325ChemistryChemistry courses typically cover topics such as the properties and structure of matter, chemical reactions, the conservation of energy, and energy transfer. Chemistry courses present students with the opportunity to plan investigations, develop and use models, and observe trends and patterns. Engineering and environmental principles will also be investigated.
9326PhysicsPhysics courses typically cover topics such as forces and motion, gravity, electricity, magnetism, energy, waves and electromagnetic radiation. Physics courses present students with opportunities for developing and using models, planning and conducting investigations, analyzing and interpreting data, using mathematical and computational thinking, and constructing explanations. Physics courses integrate a study of engineering design, links among engineering, technology, science, and society and environmental principles.
9327Integrated Science IFirst-Year Integrated Science courses typically cover topics that draw from the principles of several scientific disciplines - earth science, biology, chemistry, and physics - and organizes the material around thematic units anchored in scientific phenomena. Integrated Science I courses present students with the opportunity to study scientific concepts such as systems, models, energy, patterns, stability and change. This course also investigates principles of engineering design and California's Envionmental Principles and Concepts.
9328Integrated Science IISecond-Year Integrated Science courses typically cover topics that draw from the principles of several scientific disciplines - earth science, biology, chemistry, and physics - and organizes the material around thematic units anchored in scientific phenomena. Integrated Science II courses present students with the opportunity to study scientific themes including: systems, models, energy, patterns, stability and change. Students investigate applications of the theme using appropriate aspects from each discipline. This course builds on the content learned in Integrated Science I, addressing additional concepts or previous concepts at a more advanced academic level.
9329Integrated Science IIIThird-Year Coordinated/Integrated Science typically cover topics that draw from the principles of several scientific disciplines - earth science, biology, chemistry, and physics - and organizes the material around thematic units anchored in scientific phenomena. Integrated Science III courses present students with the opportunity to study scientific themes including: systems, models, energy, patterns, stability and change. Students investigate applications of the theme using appropriate aspects from each discipline. This course builds on the content learned Integrated Science II, addressing additional concepts or previous concepts at a more advanced academic level.
9330Integrated Science IVFourth-Year Integrated Science courses typically cover topics that draw from the principles of several scientific disciplines - earth science, biology, chemistry, and physics - and organizes the material around thematic units anchored in scientific phenomena. Integrated Science III courses present students with the opportunity to study scientific themes including: systems, models, energy, patterns, stability and change. This course builds on the content learned in Integrated Science III, addressing additional concepts in Integrated Science III or previous concepts at a more advanced academic level.
9331The Living Earth (3-course model)The Living Earth (3-course model) courses typically cover topics such ecosystem interactions and energy, the history of earth's atmosphere as it relates to photosynthesis and respiration, evidence of evolution, inheritance of traits, structure, function and growth of organisms, ecosystem stability and climate change. These courses present students with the opportunity to use evidence, evaluate claims, and develop models to interpret and enhance their understanding of core ideas in biological science and Earth and space sciences. This course presents an integration of Earth and space science and biology with an emphasis on biology.
9332Chemistry in the Earth System (3-course model)Chemistry in the Earth System (3-course model) courses typically cover topics such as combustion, heat and energy in the Earth system, atoms, elements, and molecules, chemical reactions, chemistry of climate change, dynamics of chemical reactions and ocean acidification. This course presents students with the opportunity to consider the impact of chemical reactions on the global climate system. This course presents an integration of Earth and space science and chemistry but maintains an emphasis on chemistry.
9333Physics of the Universe (3-course model)Physics of the Universe courses (3-course model) typically cover topics such as forces and motion, gravity and electromagnetism, energy conversion, nuclear processes, waves, electromagnetic radiation, stars and the origin of the universe. Physics of the Universe courses present opportunities for students to participate in engineering design challenges related to energy conversion. This course integrates engineering and envionmental principles into curriculum but maintains an emphasis on physics.
9334Aerospace educationAerospace Education Courses typically cover topics such as the principles of meteorology (e.g., atmosphere, pressures, winds and jet streams) and astronomical concepts (e.g., solar system, stars, and interplanetary bodies), the history of aviation, principles of aeronautical decision making, airplane systems, aerodynamics, and flight theory. Aerospace Education courses present students with the opportunity to explore the connection between meteorology, astronomy, and flight across and around the earth as well as into outer space.
9335Anatomy and PhysiologyAnatomy and Physiology courses typically cover the structure of the human body and its functions. Anatomy and Physiology courses present students with the opportunity to learn anatomical terminology, study cells and tissues, explore functional systems (skeletal, muscular, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, reproductive, nervous, and so on), and in some cases students dissect mammals. Anatomy and Physiology courses are usually taken after a comprehensive initial study of biology.
9336AstronomyAstronomy courses typically cover topics such as an introduction to the solar system and astronomical concepts, the names of major constellations, radio astronomy, and astronomical measuring instruments and techniques. Astronomy courses present an opportunities for students to develop the ability to compare and contrast stars, planets, and other objects in space and the way they move. This class may also explore the evolution of the universe.
9337Aviation educationAviation education courses typically cover topics such as federal aviation regulations, meteorology, navigation, aeronautical design and construction, operation and use of an aircraft, and airport operations. Aviation education courses present students with the opportunity to explore career opportunities in aviation.
9338BotanyBotany courses typically cover topics such as the growth, reproduction, anatomy, morphology, physiology, biochemistry, taxonomy, genetics, and ecology of plants. Botany courses present students with the opportunity to study plants and their relationship with the environment and develop an appreciation for living things.
9339Environmental StudiesEnvironmental Studies courses typically cover topics that allow students to examine the interrelationship between organisms and their environment. Environmental studies courses present opportunities for students to gain an awareness and understanding about ecological concepts and current environmental issues regarding air quality, water resources, energy resources, integrated water management, and human and natural communities. This course addresses California's Environmental Principles and Concepts.
9340GeologyGeology courses typically cover topics such as structure and development of the earth's crust, the composition of the earth's interior, rock types, fossils and plate tectonics. The course covers earthquakes, volcanoes, glaciation, and erosion in the context of a changing Earth. Geology courses present students with an opportunity to study the forces that form and continue to affect the Earth's crust. This course also investigates how humans interact with the natural world by integrating California's Environmental Principles and Concepts.
9341Marine ScienceMarine Science courses typically cover topics such as physical structure and chemistry of the ocean, the diversity of ocean life, marine ecology, and the scope and impact of human interactions with the oceans. Marine Science Courses present students with the opportunity to investigate both the physical and biological aspects of the ocean.
9342MeteorologyMeteorology courses typically cover topics such as the properties of the atmosphere, atmospheric layering, changing pressure, winds, water vapor, air masses, fronts, temperature changes, and weather forecasting. Meteorology courses present students with the opportunity to study and observe weather and climate and its impact on humans and the environment.
9343ZoologyZoology courses typically cover topics such as an introductory understanding of animals and the niche they occupy in their habitat, their life cycles, and evolutionary relationships to each other. Zoology courses present students with the opportunity to develop an awareness and understanding of biotic communities and to sharpen laboratory and field skills.
9344Advanced Placement (AP) Physics 2: Algebra-basedSee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9345Advanced Placement (AP) Physics 1: Algebra-basedSee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9346Advanced Placement (AP) Environmental scienceSee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9347Advanced Placement (AP) Physics C: Electricity and MagnetismSee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9348Advanced Placement (AP) Physics C: MechanicsSee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9349Advanced Placement (AP) ChemistrySee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9350Advanced Placement (AP) BiologySee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9351International Baccalaureate (IB) Sports Exercise and Health ScienceSee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9352International Baccalaureate (IB) Design technologySee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9353International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme (IB MYP) Science (biology, chemistry, or physics)See full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/middle-years-programme/curriculum/.
9354International Baccalaureate (IB) Environmental Systems and SocietiesSee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9355International Baccalaureate (IB) PhysicsSee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9356International Baccalaureate (IB) ChemistrySee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9357International Baccalaureate (IB) BiologySee full course description at https://www.ibo.org/programmes/diploma-programme/curriculum/.
9358College Credit Course - ScienceCollege science courses typically cover any science courses that are taken by a student in which the student earns college credit (dual or concurrent enrollment). This course may also count toward the high school graduation requirements (i.e., the student receives both college credit and high school credit). This is not an Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) course (AP and IB courses have their own Course Group State Codes).
9359Forensic ScienceForensic science courses typically cover topics involving the analysis of crime scene evidence such as fingerprints, DNA, hair and fibers, and other trace evidence. Forensic Science courses present students with the opportunity to explore how scientific principles are used in analyzing physical evidence found at crime scenes. This course also introduces students to a wide array of career choices in forensic science.
9360Pre-AP BiologySee full course description at https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse.
9370Safety educationSafety education courses typical cover education related to personal safety. Examples of safety education courses include but are not limited to first aid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and self-defense.
9371Driver Training - behind the wheelDriver training courses typically cover topics such as skills for operating an automobile and safe driving strategies and practices. Driver training courses present students with the opportunity to obtain behind-the-wheel training under different driving conditions.
9372Driver EducationDriver education courses typically cover topics such as the rules of the road, traffic procedures, safe driving procedures and practices, legal obligations and responsibilities, and the physical and mental factors (including alcohol and other drugs) affecting the driver's capability. Driver Education courses present students with the opportunity to prepare for behind the wheel driver training.
9373Leadership/Military scienceLeadership/Military Science courses typically cover topics such as leadership theory and action, citizenship, wellness and fitness and first aid. Leadership/Military Science courses present students with the opportunity to participate in a physical conditioning program aimed at promoting military values and military precision in group activities, such as rifle corps or marching squad. For secondary students, this course also brings together information from other subject areas, and relates these skills and knowledge to a military setting. Examples include engine mechanics, electricity or electronics, and aviation technique. This also includes the Reserve Officers Training Corp (ROTC).
9380Media Arts (Departmentalized K-8)Media Arts (Departmentalized K-8) courses typically cover topics that allow students to follow sequential, developmentally appropriate instruction in the creative and conceptual aspects of designing media arts experiences and products, including techniques, genres and styles from various and combined mediums and forms, including moving image, sound, interactive, spatial and/or interactive design.
9381Media ArtsMedia arts courses typically cover topics designed to allow students to communicate and express in a variety of media forms, and/or combined media, using various tools and processes, for specific purposes, intentions, and audiences. Media arts courses may use a problem based approach and incorporate multiple content areas and arts disciplines.
9400Agriculture (Non-Career Technical Education)Agriculture (non-Career Technical Education) courses typically cover topics that provide an introduction to agricultural sciences with emphasis on technical skills, entrepreneurship, and occupational opportunities. Agriculture (non-CTE) present students with opportunities to learn about agricultural construction, food and fiber science, supervised agricultural experiences, and leadership development.
9500Exploratory Work Experience Education (EWEE)This EWEE course provides career guidance through non-paid observations and experiences at selected worksites. EWEE is an instructional course, where students have the opportunity to observe and sample a variety of conditions of work for ascertaining their interest and suitability for the occupations they are exploring, while including related classroom instruction in WEE. EWEE provides an opportunity for a broad spectrum of students to explore career paths with the goal of clarifying career directions. (10 semester credits allowable for each semester with a maximum of 20 semester credits)
9501General Work Experience Education (GWEE)This GWEE course enables students to become productive, responsible individuals through supervised, paid employment experiences. GWEE is an instructional course, where students will acquire general and specific occupational and employability skills through a combination of supervised paid employment in any occupational field along with classroom related instruction in WEE. The rationale for having GWEE is the changing nature of work in our society, which requires students to develop appropriate work habits and attitudes that may be transferred to a variety of employment situations. (10 semester credits allowable each semester with a maximum of 40 semester credits)
9502CTE Work Experience Education (CTWEE)This CTWEE course reinforces and extends vocational learning opportunities for students through a combination of related classroom instruction and supervised paid employment. The CTWEE is to develop and refine occupational competencies necessary to acquire paid employment or paid placements, to adapt to the employment environment, and to advance in an occupation. Students enrolled in CTWEE must have a worksite placement or employment that is related to a previous or concurrently enrolled Career Technical Education course of study. (10 semester credits allowable each semester with a maximum of 40 semester credits)
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
10RemedialThe level of course content and instruction has been approved by the local governing board as intended to correct or improve one's knowledge in a specified content area.
12Gifted and TalentedThe level of course content and instruction has been approved by the local governing board as meeting the criteria for designation as a Gifted and Talented course.
14Honors - UC CertifiedThe level of course content and instruction has been identified by the University of California System as meeting the criteria for designation as a UC-Certified Honors course.
15Honors - Non-UC CertifiedThe level of course content and instruction has been approved by the local governing board as meeting the criteria for designation as an Honors course. These honors courses are not the same as UC-Certified Honors courses.
16College CreditA college-level, college credit bearing course in which a student receives college credit upon successful completion. These courses may also count toward the high school graduation requirements (i.e. the student receives both college credit and high school credit). These are not Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) courses (AP and IB courses have their own Course Group State Codes).
17IntroductoryThe course content introduces students to the course content and is usually the first course taken in a sequence of courses.
18IntermediateThe course content level is above the introductory level content, but below an advanced level. These courses are usually in the middle of a sequence of courses.
19AdvancedThe course content level is above the intermediate level. These courses are usually the last courses in a sequence of courses.
20AcceleratedThe course content is delivered at a faster pace within a shorter timeframe.
21ExploratoryThe course content level provides a broad baseline of introductory content over multiple content areas. These are also known as "wheel" courses
22BridgeThe course content level provides a bridge between a sequence of courses that reinforces concepts needed in order to progress to the next course in a sequence.
23College Credit OnlyA college-level, college credit bearing course in which a student receives only college credit upon successful completion.
24Dual CreditA college-level, college credit bearing course in which a student receives both high school and college credit upon successful completion.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
AAssociateThis is an Associate degree. The degree could be an AA, AS, AAS(Associate of Applied Sciences), or ASN (Associate of ScienceNursing). The degree is indicated on the transcripts submitted bythe applicant and the exact degree will vary by institution. Werefer to the degree in general terms as an Associate degree.
BBaccalaureateThe same applies to the Baccalaureate degree as with theAssociate degree. This may be a BA, BS, Bachelor of Education,Bachelor of Music, etc. We refer to the degree in general terms asa Bachelor's degree.
CBaccalaureate Plus 30A Bachelor's Degree plus 30 or more additional semesterunits.
DDoctorateThis is a Doctorate degree. This may be a Ph.D., Ed.D., M.D.,etc. We refer to the degree in general terms as a Doctoratedegree.
FFifth YearThis is used primarily with out-of-state or out-of-countrytrained educators who have completed a minimum of 30 semester unitsof graduate level course work after the completion of thebachelor's degree and without being granted a Master's degree. Weconsider the completion of the 30 semester units as a Fifth Year ofStudy.
MMasterThe same applies to the Master's degree as with the Associateand Bachelor's degree. This may be a MA, MS, Master of Education,etc. We refer to them in general terms as a Master's degree.
NNoneNo degree indicated on the transcripts submitted.
SSpecialThe Special Degree is used to indicate the completion of aJuris Doctor degree.
UFifth Year within BAThe Fifth Year within the BA (BS, Bachelor of Education,Bachelor of Music, etc. are also applicable) is primarily used without-of-state or out-of-country educators to indicate the completionof a minimum of 150 semester units of course work completed withinthe bachelor's degree program. Individuals who have completed the150 semester units of course work within the bachelor's degree areconsidered to have completed the equivalent of the Fifth Year ofStudy.
VMaster Plus 30A Master's Degree plus 30 or more additional semesterunits.
YFifth Year InductionThe Fifth Year Induction is used to indicate that theindividual has completed an induction program through an approvedinduction program sponsor.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
ELMElementary K-4A coded value representing that the content standards taught in a course are any grades kindergarten through four.
MIDMiddle Grades 5-8A coded value representing that the content standards taught in a course are in any grades five through eight.
NOTNot ApplicableA coded value representing the course does not use grade level content standards.
SECSecondary 9-12A coded value representing that the content standards taught in a course are in any grades nine through twelve.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
200NoneThere is no secondary disability.
210Intellectual Disability (ID)Intellectual Disability means significantly subaverage generalintellectual functioning, existing concurrently with deficits inadaptive behavior, and manifested during the developmental period,that adversely affects a child's educational performance. (34 CFRSec. 300.8(c)(6)).
220Hard of hearing (HH)Hard of Hearing means hearing, impairment, whether permanent orfluctuating, that adversely affects a child's educationalperformance, but that is not included under the definition of deafin this section.
230Deafness (DEAF)/Hearing impairment (HI)Deafness means a hearing impairment that is so severe that thechild is impaired in processing linguistic information throughlearning, with or without amplification, which adversely affectseducational performance. (34 CFR Sec. 300.8(c)(3) HearingImpairment is a federal category of disability, which includes bothhard of hearing and deaf individuals as defined above.
240Speech or language impairment (SLI)Speech or Language Impairment means a communication disordersuch as stuttering, impaired articulation, language impairment, ora voice impairment, that adversely affects a child's educationalperformance. (34 CFR Sec. 300.8(c)(11))
250Visual impairment (VI)Visually Impaired, including blindness means impairment invision that, even with correction, adversely affects a child'seducational performance. The term includes both partially seeingand blind children. (34 CFR Sec. 300.8(c)(13)).
260Emotional disturbance (ED)Emotional Disturbance means a condition exhibiting one or moreof the following characteristics, over a long period of time and toa marked degree, that adversely affects educational performance:(A) An inability to learn which cannot be explained byintellectual, sensory, or health factors; (B) An inability to buildor maintain satisfactory interpersonal relationships with peers andteachers; (C) Inappropriate types of behavior or feeling undernormal circumstances; (D) A general pervasive mood of unhappinessor depression; or (E) A tendency to develop physical symptoms orfears associated with personal or school problems. The term (ED)includes schizophrenia. The term does not apply to children who aresocially maladjusted, unless it is determined that they have anemotional disturbance. (34 CF Sec. 300.8(c)(4)).
270Orthopedic impairment (OI)Orthopedic Impairment means a severe orthopedic impairment thatadversely affects a child's educational performance. The termincludes impairments caused by congenital anomaly (e.g., clubfoot,absence of some member, etc.), impairments caused by disease (e.g.,poliomyelitis, bone tuberculosis, etc.), and impairments from othercauses (e.g., cerebral palsy, amputations, and fractures or burnswhich cause contractures). (34 CFR Sec. 300.8(b)(6 Sec.300.7(c)(8))
280Other health impairment (OHI)Other Health Impairment means having limited strength, vitalityor alertness, due to chronic or acute health problems such as aheart condition, tuberculosis, rheumatic fever, nephritis, asthma,sickle cell anemia, hemophilia, epilepsy, lead poisoning, leukemia,or diabetes, which adversely affects a child's educationalperformance. (34 CFR Sec 300.8 (c) (9)).
281Established medical disability (EMD)A disabling medical condition or congenital syndrome that theindividualized education program (IEP) team determines has a highpredictability of requiring special education and services. (CA EdCode, Section 56441.11(d)) (Note: This eligibility category is onlyapplicable for children ages 3-5)
290Specific learning disability (SLD)Specific Learning Disability means a disorder in one or more ofthe basic psychological processes involved in understanding orusing language, spoken or written, that may manifest itself in animperfect ability to listen, think, speak, read, write, spell, orto do mathematical calculations, including such conditions asperceptual disabilities, brain injury, minimal brain dysfunction,dyslexia, and developmental aphasia. The term does not includelearning problems that are primarily the result of visual, hearing,or motor handicaps, of mental retardation, of emotional disturbanceor of environmental, cultural, or economic disadvantage. (34 CFRSec. 300.8(c)(10)).
300Deaf-blindness (DB)Deaf-Blindness means concomitant hearing and visualimpairments, the combination of which causes such severecommunication and other developmental and educational needs thatthey cannot be accommodated in special education programs solelyfor children with deafness or children with blindness. (34 CFR Sec.300.8(c)(2)).
310Multiple disabilities (MD)Multiple Disabilities means concomitant impairments (such asmental retardation-blindness, mental retardation-orthopedicimpairment, etc.,) the combination of which causes such severeeducational needs that they cannot be accommodated in specialeducation programs solely for one of the impairments. The term doesnot include deaf-blind children. (34 CFR Sec. 300.8(c)(7)).
320Autism (AUT)Autism means a developmental disability significantly affectingverbal and non-verbal communication and social interaction,generally evident before age three, which adversely affectseducational performance. Other characteristics often associatedwith autism include, engagement in repetitive activities andstereotyped movements, resistance to environmental change or changein daily routines, and unusual responses to sensory experiences.The term does not does not apply if a child's educationalperformance is adversely affected primarily because the child hasan emotional disturbance. A child who manifests characteristics ofautism after age three, that child could be diagnosed as havingautism if the criteria in the above paragraph are satisfied. (34CFR Sec. 300.8(c)(1)).
330Traumatic brain injury (TBI)Traumatic Brain Injury means an acquired injury to the braincaused by an external physical force, resulting in total or partialfunctional disability or psychosocial impairment, which adverselyaffects educational performance. The term applies to both open orclosed head injuries resulting in impairments in one or more areas,such as cognition; language; memory; attention; reasoning; abstractthinking; judgment; problem-solving; sensory, perceptual and motorabilities; psychosocial behavior; physical functions; informationprocessing; and speech. The term does not include brain injuriesthat are congenital or degenerative, nor brain injuries induced bybirth trauma. (34 CFR Sec. 300.8(c)(12)).
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
10Individualized Education Program (IEP)The student has an Individualized Education Plan (IEP), which is a written plan that is developed, reviewed, and revised in a meeting in accordance with 34 CFR 300.320 through 300.324. Among other requirements, the IEP must contain a statement of the child's measurable annual goals, including academic and functional goals.
20504 Accommodation PlanThe student is receiving services provided per Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). This is not the same as an Individualized Education Plan (IEP).
30General EducationThe student participates in general education and does not have an Individualized Education Program (IEP) or 504 Accommodation Plan.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
100Individualized Education Program (IEP)The Individualized Education Program (IEP) is a written plan that is developed, reviewed, and revised in a meeting in accordance with 34 CFR 300.320 through 300.324. Among other requirements, the IEP must contain a statement of the child's measurable annual goals, including academic and functional goals.
150Individual Family Service Plan (IFSP)The Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) is a written plan that is developed for each eligible infant and toddler (Part C) with a disability per 34 CFR §§303.342 - 303.345. Among other requirements, the IFSP
200Individual Service Plan (ISP)The Individual Service Plan (ISP) is a written plan for each student with a disability in Part B and enrolled in a private school. ISP statements may identify goals with specific services such as counseling, speech
700Eligible - No Education Plan (Parent Declined FAPE - Private Placement)A student has been found eligible for special education services; however no IEP, IFSP, or ISP is in place because the student was parentally placed in a private school and the student does not need or the parent has declined the services to be provided using proportionate share
800Eligible - No Education Plan (Other Reasons)A student has been found eligible for special education services; however no IEP, IFSP, or ISP is in place because either no services were delivered, or for other reasons
300PendingA student received a referral for special education services and the parent provided consent for the initial plan type which is pending.
900Not EligibleNot eligible for special education or related services.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
108Opportunity ProgramIndicates that the student receives services in an OpportunityProgram. An Opportunity Program is a supportive environment withspecialized curriculum, instruction, guidance and counseling,psychological services, and tutorial assistance to help studentsovercome barriers to learning. It should not be viewed as apermanent placement for resistant learners but as a short-termintervention to ensure that students will succeed when they returnto their regular classrooms.
113California Partnership AcademyAn indication of participation in a California PartnershipAcademy Program.
122NCLB Title I Part A Basic TargetedIndicates participation in the No Child Left Behind Title IPart A Targeted Assistance Program.
127Gifted and Talented Education (GATE)Indicates eligibility for the Gifted and Talented EducationProgram (GATE).
131Title X McKinney-Vento Homelesss ProgramIndicates participation in the No Child Left Behind Title XHomeless Program.
135Title I Part C MigrantIndicates eligibility for the Title I Part C MigrantProgram.
162Pregnant or Parenting ProgramsIndicates participation in a program providing services tostudents who are pregnant or parenting, including but not limitedto the California School-Age Families EducationProgram(Cal-SAFE).
164NCLB Title I Part D DelinquentIndicates participation in the NCLB Title I Part D DelinquentProgram.
171NCLB Title I Part D NeglectedIndicates participation in the NCLB Title I Part D NeglectedProgram.
172NCLB Title I Part D At RiskIndicates participation in the No Child Left Behind Title IPart D At Risk Program.
173NCLB Title I Part D Juvenile DetentionIndicates participation in the No Child Left Behind Title IPart D Juvenile Detention Program.
174NCLB Title I Part A NeglectedIndicates participation in the NCLB Title I Part A NeglectedProgram.
180CAHSEE Intensive InstructionIndicates participation in the California High School Exit ExamIntensive Instruction Program.
181Free Meal ProgramIndicates that the student has met one or more of the followingeligibility criteria for receipt of free meals in the NationalSchool Lunch Program (NSLP) and/or School Breakfast Program(SBP):1) The student's household meets the United States Departmentof Agriculture's income eligibility criteria for free meals(determined by either the submission of an NSLP application or bysome other income verification form or process at the local level); or2) The student is "directly certified" based onhis/her receipt of benefits in one or more of the following federalprograms: a) Food Stamp Program; b) California Work Opportunitiesand Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) Program; c) The KinshipGuardian Assistance Payment (Kin-GAP) Program; or d) FoodDistribution Program on Indian Reservations (FDPIR); or3) Thestudent is "directly certified" by an appropriatedistrict liaison to be one of the following: a) Eligible for theMcKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Program; b) eligible for theRunaway and Homeless Youth Grant Program (42 U.S. Code 5701 etseq.); or c) a migratory child as defined in Section 1309 of theElementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965.This does notnecessarily mean that the student is actually receiving meals.
182Reduced-Price Meal ProgramIndicates that the student has met the following eligibilitycriteria for receipt of reduced-price meals in the National SchoolLunch Program (NSLP) and/or School Breakfast Program (SBP):Thestudent's household meets the United States Department ofAgriculture's income eligibility criteria for reduced-price meals(determined by either the submission of an NSLP application or bysome other income verification form or process at the locallevel).This does not necessarily mean that the student is actuallyreceiving meals.
185Transitional KindergartenIndicates participation in the Transitional KindergartenProgram.
191Homeless ProgramIndicates a student that is eligible for homeless servicesbecause they have been identified as homeless.
192Armed Forces Family MemberNEW!A student is considered to be an Armed Forces Family Member ifat least one parent is an Armed Forces member , on active duty orserves on full-time National Guard duty. The terms "armed forces","active duty" and "full-time National Guard duty"  as definedby sections, 101(a)(4), 101(d)(1) and  101(d)(5) of the UnitedStates Code are:

• 101(a) (4)   The term "armed forces" means the Army,Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard.

• 101(d) (1)   The term "active duty" means full-timeduty in the active military service of the United States. Such termincludes full-time training duty, annual training duty, andattendance, while in the active military service, at a schooldesignated as a service school by law or by the Secretary of themilitary department concerned. Such term does not include full-timeNational Guard duty.

• 101 (d) (5)   The term "full-time National Guard dutymeans training or other duty, other than inactive duty, performedby a member of the Army National Guard of the United States or theAir National Guard of the United States in the member's status as amember of the National Guard of a State or territory, theCommonwealth of Puerto Rico, or the District of Columbia undersection 316, 502, 503, 504, or 505 of title 32for which the memberis entitled to pay from the United States or for which the memberhas waived pay from the United States
300LIP - Developmental Bilingual ProgramA language instructional program (LIP) designed for English learners which provides content instruction delivered in the students’ native language and English. The goals of this program are language proficiency and academic achievement in students’ first and second languages. The portion of the instructional day delivered in each language varies by the type of program. English learners receive instruction in designated and integrated English language development (ELD) based on the California (CA) ELD standards, and all students are provided grade-level content instruction based on the state-adopted academic standards.
301LIP - Dual-Language Immersion ProgramA language instructional program (LIP) designed for English learners and native English speakers, which provides content instruction delivered in the English learners’ native language and English. Goals include language proficiency and academic achievement in students’ first and second languages, and cross-cultural understanding. English learners receive instruction in designated and integrated ELD based on the state-adopted CA ELD standards. All students are provided grade-level content instruction based on the state-adopted academic standards. Dual-Language Immersion program models may include Two-Way Immersion, 50/50 Dual Immersion, 90/10 Dual Immersion, and other similar program models.
302LIP - Heritage or Indigenous LanguageA language instructional program (LIP) in English and another language for non-English speakers or students with limited literacy skills in their first language. Indigenous language programs support endangered minority languages in which students may have limited receptive and no productive skills. Both programs often serve American Indian students. English learners receive instruction in designated and integrated English language development (ELD) based on the state-adopted CA ELD standards, and all students are provided grade-level content instruction based on the state-adopted academic standards.
303LIP - Newcomer Program (Various Models)A language instructional program (LIP) designed for English learners who are new to the country with less than 12 months of schooling in the United States. This program provides instruction in designated and integrated English language development (ELD) based on the state-adopted CA ELD standards and grade-level content instruction based on the state-adopted academic standards. Instruction and/or support may be provided in the students’ native language. Program models vary. This program has clear entry and exit criteria, with goals and timelines defined.
304LIP - One-Way Immersion ProgramA language instructional program in English and another language for non-speakers of the other language, with the goals of language proficiency and academic achievement in English and the other language, and cross-cultural understanding. The portion of the instructional day delivered in each language varies by the type of program.
305LIP - Structured English Immersion Program or other predominantly English Language Instructional ModelsA language instructional program (LIP) designed for English learners in which nearly all classroom instruction is provided in English with curriculum and a presentation designed for students who are learning English. The goals of this program are language proficiency and academic achievement in English. Students receive instruction in designated and integrated English language development (ELD) based on the state-adopted CA ELD standards and grade-level content instruction based on the state-adopted academic standards. Some instruction and/or support may be provided in the students' native language. Program models in addition to Structured English Immersion may include English Language Mainstream, or other program models in which all or nearly all instruction is delivered in English.
306LIP - Transitional Bilingual ProgramA language instructional program (LIP) designed for English learners utilizing English and students’ native language for literacy and academic instruction, with the goals of language proficiency and academic achievement in English. Students typically transition to “English only” instruction by third grade. English learners receive instruction in designated and integrated English language development (ELD) based on the state-adopted CA ELD standards, and all students are provided grade-level content instruction based on the state-adopted academic standards.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
10RemedialThe level of course content and instruction has been approvedby the local governing board as intended to correct or improveone's knowledge in a specified content area.
11Advanced PlacementThe level of course content and instruction has been approvedas meeting the College Board criteria for designation as anAdvanced Placement course.
12Gifted and TalentedThe level of course content and instruction has been approvedby the local governing board as meeting the criteria fordesignation as a Gifted and Talented course.
13International Baccalaureate (IB)The level of course content and instruction has been identifiedas meeting the International Baccalaureate Organization criteriafor designation as an International Baccalaureate course.
14Honors - UC CertifiedThe level of course content and instruction has been identifiedby the University of California System as meeting the criteria fordesignation as a UC-Certified Honors course.
15Honors Non-UC certifiedThe level of course content and instruction has been approvedby the local governing board as meeting the criteria fordesignation as an Honors course. These honors courses are not thesame as UC-Certified Honors courses.
17IntroductoryThe course content introduces students to the course content and is usually the first course taken in a sequence of courses.
18IntermediateThe course content level is above the introductory level content, but below an advanced level. These courses are usually in the middle of a sequence of courses.
19AdvancedThe course content level is above the intermediate level. These courses are usually the last courses in a sequence of courses.
20AcceleratedThe course content is delivered at a faster pace within a shorter timeframe.
21ExploratoryThe course content level provides a broad baseline of introductory content over multiple content areas. These are also known as "wheel" courses
22BridgeThe course content level provides a bridge between a sequence of courses that reinforces concepts needed in order to progress to the next course in a sequence.
23College Credit OnlyA college-level, college credit bearing course in which a student receives only college credit upon successful completion.
24Dual CreditA college-level, college credit bearing course in which a student receives both high school and college credit upon successful completion.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
113California Partnership AcademyFunding is or was provided by the California Partnership Academy Program.
168Specialized Secondary ProgramsFunding is or was provided by the Specialized Secondary Program (SSP).
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
1GrantedThe request for a waiver was approved by the properauthority.
2DeniedThe request for a waiver was denied by the properauthority.
3WithdrawnThe request for a waiver was withdrawn by the originalrequestor.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
1GrantedThe request for a waiver was approved by the proper authority.
2DeniedThe request for a waiver was denied by the proper authority.
3WithdrawnThe request for a waiver was withdrawn by the original requestor.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
1Primary Language Instruction and Designated and Integrated English Language Development (ELD) InstructionThis course section provides primary language instruction and designated and integrated ELD. Primary language instruction is an approach used to teach academic courses in and/or through a language other than English. The curriculum must be equivalent to that provided to fluent English proficient (FEP) and native speakers of English. Designated ELD is an academic subject of English language instruction leading to English language proficiency. Integrated ELD is an approach designed for English learners focused on making academic courses normally provided to FEP and native English speakers comprehensible, while increasing English language proficiency. All services in this course section must be provided by a teacher with the appropriate EL authorizations.
2Designated ELD Instruction OnlyThis course section provides designated ELD instruction. Designated ELD is an academic subject of English language instruction leading to English language proficiency. Instruction must be provided by a teacher with the appropriate EL authorizations.
3Integrated ELD Instruction OnlyThis course section provides only integrated ELD, which is an approach designed for English learners focused on making academic courses normally provided to FEP and native English speakers comprehensible, while increasing English language proficiency. Instruction must be provided by a teacher with the appropriate EL authorizations.
4Designated and Integrated ELD Instruction But Not Primary Language InstructionThis course section provides designated and integrated ELD instruction but NOT Primary Language Instruction. Designated ELD is an academic subject of English language instruction appropriate for the student's identified level of language proficiency. Integrated ELD is an approach used to teach academic courses to English learners in English. Integrated ELD must be designed for English learners and focused on the comprehensibility of the academic courses normally provided to FEP and native English speakers in the district, while increasing English language acquisition. All services in this course section must be provided by a teacher with the appropriate EL authorizations.
5No English Learner ServicesThis course section does not provide any instructional services designed for English learners to learn English or access to the core curriculum. The local educational agency (LEA) has documentation on file for students in this course section to demonstrate the parents have chosen to opt out of such services. The LEA remains obligated to take affirmative steps to provide access and inform parents of any lack of progress and offer further opportunities to enroll the students in an EL program.
6Other English Learner ServiceThis course section is providing some type of instructional service that, while specifically designed for English learners, is an instructional service that is not narrowly defined in the other EL services (Primary Language Instruction, designated and integrated ELD). These instructional services vary either quantitatively or qualitatively from the other EL services. Instruction must be provided by a teacher with the appropriate EL authorizations.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
05T1-Instruction MathematicsA targeted instructional service in mathematics received under Title I Part A Basic.
06T1-Reading Language ArtsA targeted instructional service in reading/language arts received under Title I Part A Basic.
07T1-ScienceA targeted instructional service in science received under Title I Part A Basic.
08T1-Social StudiesA targeted instructional service in social studies received under Title I Part A Basic.
09T1-Vocational/CareerA targeted vocational/career instructional service received under Title I Part A Basic.
10T1-Other Instructional ServiceAnother type of targeted instructional service received under Title I Part A Basic.
11T1-Health Dental and Eye CareA targeted health, dental, or eye care support service received under Title I Part A Basic.
12T1-Guidance/AdvocacyA targeted guidance/advocacy support service received under Title I Part A Basic.
13T1-Other Support ServiceAnother support service received under Title I Part A Basic.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
10AdministratorAn employee of the Education Service Institution in a positionrequiring certification but who is not required to provide directinstruction to pupils or direct services to pupils (services suchas those provided by a pupil services employee. This category doesnot include mentor teachers.
11Pupil servicesAn employee of an Educational Service Institution who is in a position requiring a standard designated services credential or a health and development credential and who performs direct services to pupils (counselors, guidance and welfare personnel, psychologists, etc.). Program specialists as defined in Education Code Section 56368 are also to be reported as pupil service employees.
12TeacherAn employee of the Educational Service Institution who holds aposition requiring certification or other state alternative andwhose duties require direct instruction to the pupils in theschool(s) of that district, including mentor teachers and in somecases, long-term substitute teachers.
24Other K-12 Classified staffAn employee of an Educational Service Institution who isNon-certificated, such as clerical staff, custodians, food servicestaff, bus drivers, noon-duty supervisors, etc. Does not includenon-certificated administrators. These elements would likely becollected in an aggregate or summary form.
25Non-certificated AdministratorAn employee of an Educational Service Institution at theadministrative level (assistant, deputy or associatesuperintendent, or higher) who has been waived of the requirementof having to possess an administrative services credential.
26Charter School Non-certificated TeacherAn employee of a charter school that is providing instructionin a non-core course (as defined in the school's charter) who hasbeen waived of the requirement of having to obtain a teachingcredential.
27Itinerant or Pull-Out/Push-In TeacherAn itinerant staff member assigned to more than one school siteand/or a teacher who provides one-on-one or small group support orresource instruction by either pulling students out of theclassroom, or coming into the classroom to provide theinstruction.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
1TenuredThe teacher is granted the right not to be fired without causeafter an initial probationary period.
2ProbationaryThe teacher is in a trial period of his or her employment todetermine whether or not he or she is suitable for theposition.
3TemporaryThe teacher is hired with the intention that he or she willemployed for a finite period of time.
4OtherAny other type of employment status for a teacher, such asteachers who are not official employees of a district and arecontracted employees from another agency or district.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
1Evidence of Non-English Primary LanguageThe English language acquisition status for a student in any grades kindergarten through 12 is being corrected due to evidence that a primary language other than English exists and the student is unable to perform ordinary class work in English. The ELAS status is being corrected from English Only (EO) to either to English Learner (EL) or Initial Fluent English Proficient (IFEP).
2Rotating Score Validation Process ErrorThe English language acquisition status for a student in any grades kindergarten through 12 is being corrected due to a difference in scores identified by the test contractor on the Initial English Language
3Home Language Survey ErrorThe English language acquisition status for a student in any grades kindergarten through 12 is being corrected due to an error made by a parent or guardian when completing the Home Language Survey (HLS).
4Ineligible Student TestedThe English language acquisition status for a student in any grades kindergarten through 12 is being corrected because the student tested was not eligible to take either the Initial or Summative ELPAC.
5Evidence for EL or IFEPThe English language acquisition status as established by the Initial English Language Proficiency Assessments for California (ELPAC) for a student in any grades kindergarten through 12 is being corrected due to
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
ELEnglish LearnerA student in kindergarten through grade 12 for whom there is areport of a language other than English on the Home Language Surveyand who, upon initial assessment in California using an appropriatestate assessment (currently the California English LanguageDevelopment Test (CELDT)) and from additional information whenappropriate, is determined to lack the clearly defined Englishlanguage skills of listening, speaking, reading, and/or writingnecessary to succeed in the school's regular instructionalprograms.
EOEnglish or American Sign Language OnlyA student in kindergarten through grade 12 for whom the onlylanguage reported on the Home Language Survey (HLS) is English orAmerican Sign Language.
IFEPInitial Fluent English ProficientA student in kindergarten through grade 12 for whom a languageother than English is reported on the Home Language Survey and who,upon initial assessment in California using an appropriate stateassessment (currently the California English Language DevelopmentTest (CELDT)) and from additional information when appropriate, isdetermined to be proficient in English.
RFEPReclassified Fluent English ProficientA student in kindergarten through grade 12 who, upon enteringpublic school in California, is identified as an English learner(EL) and subsequently reclassified/redesignated in California, perEducation Code 313, as proficient in English. Education Code 313criteria include, but are not limited to, an assessment of Englishproficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing ascurrently measured by the California English Language DevelopmentTest (CELDT), teacher evaluation of curriculum mastery, parentalopinion/consultation, and student's performance of basic skills, asmeasured by the California Standards Test English Language Arts,that demonstrates sufficient proficiency in English to participateeffectively in a curriculum designed for students of the same agewhose native language is English.
TBDTo Be DeterminedA student in kindergarten through grade 12 for whom there is areport of a primary language other than English on the HomeLanguage Survey and for whom the district has not completed theassessment process. The assessment process must be completed within30 days of initial enrollment.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
NNoA student who was reclassified as fluent English proficient(R-FEP) has not scored at the proficient or advanced level on theCalifornia Standards Test in English Language Arts for three years(not necessarily consecutive).
UUnknownThe response cannot be determined.
YYesA student who was reclassified as fluent English proficient(R-FEP) has scored at the proficient or advanced level on theCalifornia Standards Test in English Language Arts for three years(not necessarily consecutive).
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
10Primary enrollmentThe student's name appears on a register, roll, or list, thestudent is currently attending (or intends to attend) theeducational service institution (ESI), or is responsible for thestudents instruction (students attending NPS schools).
20Secondary enrollmentThe student's name appears on a register, roll, or list and thestudent is currently attending the educational service institutionconcurrently with their PRIMARY educational serviceinstitution
30Short term enrollmentThe student's name appears on a register, roll, or list, thestudent is currently attending the educational service institution,and receives or will receive the majority of their instruction atthe institution for less than 30 days. (Use allowed only byspecific ESIs)
50Non-ADA Enrollment Status
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
FFemaleFemale
MMaleMale
XNonbinaryNonbinary
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
01First GradeGrade One
02Second GradeGrade Two
03Third GradeGrade Three
04Fourth GradeGrade Four
05Fifth GradeGrade Five
06Sixth GradeGrade Six
07Seventh GradeGrade Seven
08Eighth GradeGrade Eight
09Ninth GradeGrade Nine
10Tenth GradeGrade Ten
11Eleventh GradeGrade Eleven
12Twelfth GradeGrade Twelve
ADAdultA category for students who are primarily enrolled in an adulteducation center. These students would not have an affiliation witha K-12 institution.
INInfantA grade level for individuals, ages 0 through 18 months.
KNKindergartenKindergarten
PSPrekindergartenA grade level for individuals, ages 36 months to 5 years old, who are formally enrolled in a preschool program in preparation for entrance to kindergarten.
TDToddlersA grade level for individuals, ages 19 months through 35months, not yet enrolled in a public educational institution orformal preschool program.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
TBNNegative - TubercolosisThe presence of the antibody for tuberculosis has not beendetected.
TBPPositive - TuberculosisThe presence of the antibody for tuberculosis has beendetected.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
10Graduate Degree or HigherAn individual received a Master's or Doctorate Degree.
11College GraduateAn individual attended a postsecondary education institutionand graduated with a Bachelor's Degree.
12Some College or Associate's DegreeAn individual attended or is attending a postsecondaryeducation institution but did not or has not yet graduated with aBachelor's Degree. This includes a student who received anAssociate's Degree.
13High School GraduateAn individual graduated from high school, met all state andlocal graduation requirements, and received a standard high schooldiploma.
14Not a High School GraduateAn individual did not meet all state and local graduationrequirements and did not receive a standard high schooldiploma.
15Decline to StateAn individual declined to state his or her highest educationallevel. This is not the same as unknown (missing information).
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
100Temporary SheltersA temporary residence provided for homeless individuals whowould otherwise sleep on the street or a temporary residenceprovided to individuals in emergency situations. This is alsoapplicable to children who are in temporary residences awaitingpermanent placement in foster care.
110Hotels/motelsA temporary residence for homeless individuals usuallyrequiring payment or vouchers for lodging and services on a daily,weekly, or monthly basis.
120Temporarily Doubled UpA temporary residence where a homeless family is sharing thehousing of other persons due to the loss of housing, economichardship, or other similar reasons.
130Temporarily UnshelteredA type of residence for homeless individuals that is not meantfor human habitation, such as cars, parks, sidewalks, abandonedbuildings, campgrounds, trailer parks, bus and train stations, orpersons abandoned in the hospital (on the street). A rule of thumbwould be to see the dwelling as comparable to an automobile in thatit shelters but is not adequate housing.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
10County RecordA document maintained by a county operated by a county healthfacility providing proof of immunization.
20Health Clinic RecordsA document maintained by a private health clinic providingproof of immunization.
30State School Immunization RecordsA document maintained by a state operated school providingproof of immunization, commonly known as the blue card.
40Migrant Student RecordsA document or record maintained by the Migrant EducationProgram providing proof of immunization.
50Physician's ReportA document provided by a licensed physician providing proof ofimmunization.
60Out-of-state School RecordA document provided by an out-of-state school providing proofof immunization.
70Foreign Immunization RecordA document provided by a foreign agency providing proof ofimmunization.
80Other SourceAny other source of documentation used to provide proof ofimmunization.
90Yellow California Immunization RecordA document issued by the State of California that is used todocument an individual's immunizations. This record is maintainedseparately from the blue California School ImmunizationRecord.
NOTE Since Jan 1, 2015, students may not be suspended or expelled in grades K-3 for any reason, or in grades 4-12 for defiance/disruption.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
100Enforcement SuspendedThe enforcement of the expulsion order was suspended by the local governing board. Education Code Section 48917(A) or the enforcement of a suspension was suspended by school personnel or local governing board.
200ShortenedThe term of expulsion was shortened to be less than one year by the local governing board (as provided by Education Code Section 48916[a]) or the duration of a suspension was shortened by school personnel or local governing board.
300No ModificationThere was no modification made to an expulsion or suspension.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
100PolioOral Poliovirus Vaccine (OPV) or Inactive Poliovirus Vaccine(IPV)
110DTP/DtaP/DT/TdDiptheria, Tetanus, and Pertussis.
120MMRMeasles, Mumps, and Rubella
130HIB MeningitisHaemophilus influenzae type b meningitis
140Hep AHepatitis A Virus
150HBVHepatitis B Virus
160Varicella (Chicken pox)Varicella/Chicken Pox virus
170TBTuberculosis
180RSVRespiratory Syncytial Virus.
190PCVPneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine
200PPVPneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine
210INFInfluenza
220Tuberculosis Screening - PPD-MantouxA type of skin test used to detect the presence of tuberculosisin an individual using a purified protein derivative (PPD).
230Tuberculosis Screening - OtherAny other type of skin test used to detect the presence oftuberculosis in an individual.
300OtherAny other vaccine or health screening not listed.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
MMedicalThe individual has a medical exemption for a specificimmunization.
OOccurrenceThe individual has a written statement from his or herphysician, and in some cases laboratory confirmation, indicatingthat the individual has had a previous occurrence of a specificdisease and is therefore exempted from a specificimmunization.
PPersonalThe individual has personal reasons for requesting an exemptionfrom a specific immunization.
RReligiousThe individual has religious beliefs that prohibit a specificimmunization.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
100PolioOral Poliovirus Vaccine (OPV) or Inactive Poliovirus Vaccine (IPV)
110DTP/DtaP/DT/TdDiphtheria, Tetanus, and Pertussis.
120MMRMeasles, Mumps, and Rubella
130HIB MeningitisHaemophilus influenzae type b meningitis
140Hep AHepatitis A Virus
150HBVHepatitis B Virus
160Varicella (Chicken pox)Varicella/Chicken Pox virus
170TBTuberculosis
180RSVRespiratory Syncytial Virus.
190PCVPneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine
200PPVPneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine
210INFInfluenza
220Tuberculosis Screening - PPD-MantouxA type of skin test used to detect the presence of tuberculosis in an individual using a purified protein derivative (PPD).
230Tuberculosis Screening - OtherAny other type of skin test used to detect the presence of tuberculosis in an individual.
300OtherAny other vaccine or health screening not listed.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
300Home and HospitalInstruction provided to an individual pupil in the pupil's home, in a hospital or other residential health facility, excluding state hospitals, or under other circumstances prescribed by regulations adopted for that purpose by the State Board of Education (Education Code Section 48206.3(1)).
400Dual Language Immersion ProgramAn instructional program designed for English learners and native English speakers, with core content instruction delivered in the English learners’ native language and English. English learners receive instruction in English language development (ELD) based on the state-adopted California (CA) ELD standards, and all students are provided grade-level core content instruction based on the state-adopted standards. Dual-Language Immersion program models may include Two-Way Immersion, One-Way Immersion, 50/50 Dual Immersion, 90/10 Dual Immersion, and other similar program models.
500Structured English Immersion/Other English ModelsAn instructional program for English learners in which nearly all classroom instruction is provided in English with curriculum and a presentation designed for students who are learning English. Students receive instruction in ELD based on the state-adopted CA ELD standards and grade-level core content based on the state-adopted academic content standards. Some instruction and/or support may be provided in the students' native language. Program models in addition to Structured English Immersion may include English Language Mainstream, or other program models in which all or nearly all instruction is delivered in English.
600English Learner Bilingual ProgramAn instructional program for English learners which provides instruction utilizing a student’s native language for literacy and academic instruction. The portion of the instructional day delivered in each language varies by the type of program and its goals. Students receive instruction in ELD based on the state-adopted CA ELD standards and grade-level core content instruction based on the state-adopted academic content standards. This program is specifically designed to address the learning and language acquisition needs of English learners. EL bilingual program models may include Transitional bilingual and Developmental bilingual programs, Heritage language or Indigenous language programs, Native Speakers Courses, and other similar program models.
650English Learner MainstreamingAn instructional strategy where English learners (ELs) who score at reasonable fluency in English are placed in an English Language Mainstream (ELM) program setting, which is taught in English with curriculum and presentation designed for students who are learning the English language. Students receive instruction in English language development (ELD) and other grade-level core content based on state standards. Some assistance may be provided in the primary language.
700Special EducationAn instructional strategy using the individually planned and systematically monitored arrangement of physical settings, special equipment and materials, teaching procedures, and other interventions designed to help learners with special needs achieve the greatest possible personal self-sufficiency and success in school and community.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
00EnglishEnglish
01SpanishSpanish
02VietnameseVietnamese
03CantoneseCantonese
04KoreanKorean
05Filipino (Pilipino or Tagalog)Pilipino (Tagalog)
06PortuguesePortuguese
07Mandarin (Putonghua)Mandarin (Putonghua)
08JapaneseJapanese
09Khmer (Cambodian)Khmer (Cambodian)
10LaoLao
11ArabicArabic
12ArmenianArmenian
13BurmeseBurmese
14CroatianCroatian
15DutchDutch
16Farsi (Persian)Farsi (Persian)
17FrenchFrench
18GermanGerman
19GreekGreek
20Chamorro (Guamanian)Chamorro (Guamanian)
21HebrewHebrew
22HindiHindi
23HmongHmong
24HungarianHungarian
25IlocanoIlocano
26IndonesianIndonesian
27ItalianItalian
28PunjabiPunjabi
29RussianRussian
30SamoanSamoan
31SerbianSerbian
32ThaiThai
33TurkishTurkish
34TonganTongan
35UrduUrdu
36Cebuano (Visayan)Cebuano (Visayan)
37Sign LanguageSign Language
38UkrainianUkrainian
39Chaozhou (Chiuchow)Chaozhou (Chiuchow)
40PashtoPashto
41PolishPolish
42AssyrianAssyrian
43GujaratiGujarati
44Mien (Yao)Mien (Yao)
45RumanianRumanian
46TaiwaneseTaiwanese
47LahuLahu
48MarshalleseMarshallese
49MixtecoMixteco
50KhmuKhmu
51Kurdish (Kurdi, Kurmanji)Kurdish (Kurdi, Kurmanji)
52Serbo-Croatian (Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian)Serbo-Croatian (Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian)
53ToishaneseToishanese
54ChaldeanChaldean
56AlbanianAlbanian
57TigrinyaTigrinya
58BosnianBosnian
60SomaliSomali
61BengaliBengali
62TeluguTelugu
63TamilTamil
64MarathiMarathi
65KannadaKannada
66AmharicAmharic
67BulgarianBulgarian
68Kikuyu (Gikuyu)Kikuyu (Gikuyu)
69KashmiriKashmiri
70SwedishSwedish
71ZapotecoZapoteco
72UzbekUzbek
73Haitian (Haitian Creole)Haitian (Haitian Creole)
74Kachin (Jingpho) Kachin (Jingpho)
75Karen languages Karen languages
76Nepali Nepali
77Swahili Swahili
78OromoOromo
79LingalaLingala
80Kinyarwanda Kinyarwanda
81DzongkhaDzongkha
82DinkaDinka
99Other non-English languagesOther non-English languages
UUUnknownUnknown
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
1EligibleAn individual has met the criteria for participation in anEducation Program.
3ParticipatingAn individual is eligible, enrolled, and is receiving servicesthrough an Education Program.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
10Parent Refused To ConsentThe meeting was delayed because the parent refused to consent.
20Parent Did Not Make Child AvailableThe meeting was delayed because the parent did not make child available.
30Parent Contacted - Did Not AttendThe meeting was delayed because the parent, even though contacted, did not attend.
40School BreakThe meeting was delayed because of an official school break of more than five days.
50TransferThe meeting was delayed because the student transferred out of the school before the meeting occurred.
60School EmergencyThe meeting was delayed due to circumstances beyond the staff’s control such as a natural disaster (flood, earthquake), or other emergency situations where the students and staff must be evacuated.
70Student EmergencyThe meeting was delayed because of hospitalization, parent incarceration, house burned down, or other emergencies involving the student that are not identified in other reasons for the delayed meeting.
75Temporary School ClosureThe meeting was delayed due to the temporary closure of the school for reasons such as emergency maintenance or repairs.
80Due Process / Settlement Agreement The meeting was delayed due to legal proceedings involving the child, the LEA, and or parents.
85Did not pass hearing and/or vision screeningThe meeting was delayed because the student did not pass their hearing and/or vision screening.
90Late Without CauseThe meeting was delayed without cause.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
1EligibleAn individual has met the criteria for participation in an Education Program.
3ParticipatingAn individual is eligible, enrolled, and is receiving services through an Education Program.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
1Team teachingTwo or more teachers providing instruction to the class duringthe entire class session.
2Job sharingTwo or more teachers providing instruction to the class on analternating basis, and not at the same time.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
JRJuniorA child who has the same first, middle, and last names as theirparent.
SRSeniorThe eldest of two or more persons in a family with the samefirst, middle, and last names.
IThe FirstA suffix to an individual's name indicating they are the firstperson in their family to be given a specific name, if there ismore than one person in a family with that name.
IIThe SecondA suffix to an individual's name indicating they are the secondperson in their family to be given a specific name, if there ismore than one person in a family with that name.
IIIThe ThirdA suffix to an individual's name indicating they are the thirdperson in their family to be given a specific name, if there ismore than one person in a family with that name.
IVThe FourthA suffix to an individual's name indicating they are the fourthperson in their family to be given a specific name, if there ismore than one person in a family with that name.
VThe FifthA suffix to an individual's name indicating they are the fifthperson in their family to be given a specific name, if there ismore than one person in a family with that name.
VIThe SixthA suffix to an individual's name indicating they are the sixthperson in their family to be given a specific name, if there ismore than one person in a family with that name.
VIIThe SeventhA suffix to an individual's name indicating they are the eighthperson in their family to be given a specific name, if there ismore than one person in a family with that name.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
0100 Superintendent Superintendent
0102Deputy or associate superintendent (general)Deputy or associate superintendent (general)
0110Administrator - Staff developmentAdministrator - Staff development
0137Administrator - OtherAdministrator - Other
0160Charter School Administrator or DirectorA charter school administrator or director is an individual whois responsible for the day-to-day operations of a charter school,as specified in the school's charter.
0161Administrator - Program CoordinatorAdministrator - Program Coordinator
0202PsychologistA school psychologist provides services that enhance academicperformance; designs strategies and programs to address problems ofadjustment; consults with other educators and parents on issues ofsocial development, behavioral and academic difficulties; conductspsycho-educational assessments for purposes of identifying specialneeds; provides psychological counseling for individuals, groupsand families; and coordinates intervention strategies formanagement of individual and school-wide crises.
0203PsychometristA psychometrist administers psychological examinations tostudents but is not authorized to read and interpret theexaminations. A school psychologist authorization allows the holderto administer the examinations and read and interpret them.
0204Teacher LibrarianA teacher librarian can do the following:1) instruct pupils inthe choice and use of library materials;2) plan and coordinateschool library programs with the instructional programs of a schooldistrict;3) select materials for school and district libraries;4)coordinate or supervise library programs at the school site,district or county level;5) plan and conduct a course ofinstruction for those pupils who assist in the operation of schoollibraries;6) supervise classified personnel assigned school libraryduties; and7) develop procedures for and management of the schoolsite and district libraries.
0205Social workerA school social worker assesses home, school, personal andcommunity factors that may affect a student's learning; identifiesand provides intervention strategies for children and theirfamilies including counseling, case management, and crisisintervention; consults with teachers, administrators and otherschool staff regarding social and emotional needs of students; andcoordinates family, school and community resources on behalf ofstudents.
0206NurseA school nurse can perform the following:1) conductimmunization programs;2) assess and evaluate the health anddevelopment status of pupils;3) interpret the health anddevelopment assessment to parents, teachers, administrators andother professionals directly concerned with the pupil;4) design andimplement individual student health maintenance plans;5) maintaincommunication with parents and all involved community practitionersand agencies;6) interpret medical and nursing findings appropriateto the student's individualized education program and makerecommendations to professional personnel directly involved;7)consult, conduct, and serve as a resource person for in-servicetraining to teachersand administrators;8) develop and implementhealth education curriculum; act as a participant in implementing acomprehensive health instruction curriculum for students;9) counseland assist pupils and parents in health related and schooladjustment services; and10) teach health-related subjects under thesupervision of a classroom teacher.
0208Special education resource specialistSpecial education resource specialist
0209Other medical professionalA medical professional employed by a local educational agency providing any other medical services.
0211Speech-Language PathologistsA credentialed or licensed Speech-Language Pathologists whoprovides services to children with disabilities from preschoolthrough age 22 for identification of children with speech orlanguage impairments; diagnosis and appraisal of specific speech orlanguage impairments; referral for medical or other professionalattention necessary for the habilitation of speech or languageimpairments; provision of speech and language services for thehabilitation or prevention of communicative impairments; andcounseling and guidance of parents, children, and teachersregarding speech and language impairments.
0212AudiologistA health care professional employed by a local educational agency who is trained to evaluate and rehabilitiate individuals with hearing loss and related disorders.
0213Physical therapistA health care professional employed by a local education agency who is trained in the treatment of disease, injury, or deformity by physical methods such as massage, heat treatment, and exercise.
0214Vision therapistA health care professional employed by a local educational agency who is trained to develop, rehabilitate and enhance visual skills and processing.
0215Rehabilitation CounselorA credentialed or licensed individual who provides services in individual or group sessions that focus specifically on career development, employment preparation, achieving independence, and integration in the workplace and community of a student with a disability. The term also includes vocational rehabilitation services provided to a student with disabilities by vocational rehabilitation programs funded under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.
0218Medical/Nursing ServicesA qualified individual who provides services to students withdisabilities preschool to age 22 pursuant to an IEP when a studenthas health problems which require nursing intervention beyond basicschool health services.Include medical services provided by alicensed physician for diagnostic and evaluation purposes providedto determine whether a child has a disability and the nature andextent of the special education and related services that the childneeds. Also include personnel who provide nursing services designedto enable a child with a disability to receive FAPE as described inthe child's IEP, with the exception of services related to medicaldevices that are surgically implanted (e.g., cochlearimplants).
0223Occupational therapistA healthcare professional employed by a local educational agency trained to treat injured, ill, or disabled patients through the therapeutic use of everyday activities. They help these patients develop, recover, improve, as well as maintain the skills needed for daily living and working
0225Orientation and mobility specialistStaff employed by a local educational agency who provide instruction for individuals who are blind or visually impaired with safe and effective travel through their environment.
0226Deaf or Hard of Hearing InterpreterA certified, licensed or registered individual who provideseducational interpreting services pursuant to an IEP for preschoolstudents through age 22, to children who are deaf or hard ofhearing, including oral transliteration services, cued languagetransliteration services, and sign language interpreting services.5 CCR 3051.16-65
0229Child Welfare and Attendance SupervisorA certificated staff member employed by a local educational agency with the authority to access appropriate services from both public and private providers, including law enforcement and social services; provide staff development to school personnel regarding state and federal laws pertaining to due process and child welfare and attendance laws; address school policies and procedures that inhibit academic success; implement strategies to improve student attendance; participate in school-wide reform efforts; and promote understanding and appreciation of those factors that affect the attendance of culturally-diverse student populations.
0301PrincipalPrincipal
0302Vice principal or assoc/asst administratorA vice principal or associate/assistant principal is an administrator under the direct supervision of the principal assists the principal in adminstering specific programs, directing various academic activities, and planning and coordinating functions.
0319Teacher Induction Program CoordinatorA certificated staff member coordinating Induction programs which are comprehensive initiations or introductions to a position that provide inexperienced teachers with the necessary models and tools for beginning their teaching careers, as well as specific guidance aimed at helping them meet performance standards.
0400CounselorA counselor develops, plans, implements and evaluates a schoolcounseling and guidance program that includes academic, career,personal and social development; advocate for the higher academicachievement and social development of all students; provideschool-wide prevention and intervention strategies and counselingservices; provide consultation, training and staff development toteachers and parents regarding students' needs; and supervise adistrict-approved advisory program as described in Education CodeSection 49600.
6010Mentor teacherA credentialed teacher that is providing guidance, knowledge, and support to other teachers. Teachers in these assignments are not instructing students.
6011Peer assistance and reviewA teacher with extensive subject matter knowledge and experience, as well as exemplary teaching strategies that provides assistance and support to teachers whose bi-annual personnel reviews were not satisfactory.
6014Day to Day substitute teacher - permanent emp.A staff member permanently employed by a local educational agency that is temporarily assigned to teach classes while a permanent teacher is either out on leave or is yet to be hired.
6018Employee on LeaveAn employee is still employed with an LEA but has taken atemporary leave of absence from all of their staffassignments.
6020Other Certificated non-instructional assignmentA certificated staff member that is in any other type of non-instructional assignment.
6027Non-Instructional Teacher LibrarianTeachers in this assignment hold a Teacher Librarian Services Credential and may perform the following duties: plan and coordinate school library programs with the instructional programs of a school district through collaboration with teachers; select materials for school and district libraries; develop programs for and deliver staff development for school library services; coordinate or supervise library programs at the school, district or county level; supervise classified personnel assigned school library duties; and develop procedures for and management of the school and district libraries. These teachers do not provide instruction to students in either classroom-based or pull-out or push-in settings.
6099Department ChairA staff member employed by a local educational agency who manages staff, programs and activities within a specific curricular department (e.g., mathematics, English, science).
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
AAlcohol RelatedAlcohol-related incidents are those in which the reason for atleast one-day removal from the classroom is one of the following: òAlcohol possession or use on school grounds.ò Being under theinfluence of alcohol on school grounds.
DIllicit Drug RelatedDrug-related incidents are those in which the reason for atleast one-day removal from the classroom is an event involvingpossession or use of substances that include tobacco or illicitdrugs (including steroids, all prescription drugs for which thestudent does not have a prescription and inappropriate use ofnonprescription drugs and other substances). Drug-related incidentswill include the following:
● Possession or use of marijuana, hashish, or othercannabinoids on school grounds.
● Other illicit drugs possession or use on schoolgrounds.
● Being under the influence of marijuana or illicit drugs onschool grounds.
● Tobacco possession or use on school grounds.
● Inappropriate use of medication on school grounds.
● Trafficking or possession for sale of marijuana or otherillicit drugs on school grounds.
OTHEROther reasons for out of school suspensions related to drug useand violenceOther reasons for out of school suspensions related to drug useand violence.
VIOWINJViolent Incident (with Physical Injury)Violent incidents may include, but are not limited to, thefollowing:● Battery (physical attack or harm): Examplesinclude striking that causes bleeding, broken nose, and kicking astudent while he or she is down. Consider age and developmentallyappropriate behavior before using this category. This categoryshould be used when the attack is serious enough to warrant callingthe police or security or when serious bodily harm occurs. Includean attack with a weapon in this category. (This offense may bereferred to by law enforcement as aggravated assault.)●Fighting (mutual altercation): Mutual participation in an incidentinvolving physical violence where there is no major injury.●Harassment, nonsexual (physical, verbal, or psychological):Repeatedly annoying or attacking a student or group of students orother personnel that creates an intimidating or hostile educationalor work environment.● Harassment, sexual (unwelcome sexualconduct): Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors,other physical or verbal conduct, or communication of a sexualnature, including gender-based harassment that creates anintimidating, hostile, or offensive educational or workenvironment.● Homicide (murder or manslaughter): Killing ahuman being.●  Physical altercation, minor (pushing,shoving): Confrontation, tussle, or physical aggression that doesnot result in injury.● Robbery (taking of things by force):The taking of, or attempting to take, anything of value that isowned by another person or organization under confrontationalcircumstances by force or threat of force or violence and/or byputting the victim in fear. A key difference between robbery andtheft is that the threat of physical harm or actual physical harmis involved in a robbery.● School threat (threat ofdestruction or harm): Any threat (verbal, written, or electronic)by a person to bomb or use other substances or devices for thepurpose of exploding, burning, or causing damage to a schoolbuilding or school property, or to harm students or staff.●Sexual battery (sexual assault): Oral, anal, or vaginal penetrationforcibly or against the person's will or where the victim isincapable of giving consent. Includes rape, fondling, indecentliberties, child molestation, and sodomy.●  Threat/intimidation (causing fear ofharm): Physical, verbal, written, or electronic action whichimmediately creates fear of harm, without displaying a weapon andwithout subjecting the victim to actual physical attack. (Thiscategory only includes verbal incidents that cause fear. It doesnot include insubordination, lack of respect, defiance ofauthority, etc.).
VIOWOINJViolent Incident (without Physical Injury)Incidents with injury include those in which one or morestudents, school personnel, or other persons on school groundsrequire professional medical attention. Examples include stab orbullet wounds, concussions, fractured or broken bones, or cutsrequiring stitches.
WWeapons PossessionPossession of one of the following items:
● Handgun.
● Shotgun or rifle.
● Other type of firearm (e.g., devices designed to expel aprojectile, grenade, explosive).
● Knife.
● Other sharp object (e.g., razor blade, ice pick, Chinesestar).
● Other object (chain, brass knuckle, billy club, stungun).
● Substance used as a weapon (mace, tear gas).
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
10YesThe parent responded that the school district did facilitate parent involvement as a means of improving services and results for his/her child.
20NoThe parent responded that the school district did NOT facilitate parent involvement as a means of improving services and results for his/her child.
30No Response GivenThe parent did NOT provide a response to the question, “Did the school district facilitate parent involvement as a means of improving services and results for your child?”
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
200Enrolled in a Four-year college/universityThe student is enrolled in an institution of learning of the highest level, having a college of liberal arts and a program of graduate studies together with several professional schools, as of theology, law, medicine, and engineering, and authorized to confer both undergraduate and graduate degrees.
210Enrolled in a community collegeThe student is enrolled in a two-year government-supported college that offers an associate degree.
220Enrolled in a vocational or technical school (two year degree program)The student is enrolled in a trade school, also known as a technical or vocational school, that offers two-year degree programs. It is an educational institution that exists to teach skills related to a specific job.
300Enrolled in a High School Equivalency Test Preparation ProgramThe student is enrolled in a program to prepare students to take one of the three high school equivalency tests (HSET): General Education Development (GED), High School Equivalency Test (HiSET), and Test Assessing Secondary Completion (TASC).
310Enrolled in a vocational or technical school (certificate program)The student is enrolled in a trade school, also known as a technical or vocational school, that offers certificate programs in fields such as cosmetology, paramedic-EMT, and culinary arts. It is an educational institution that exists to teach skills related to a specific job.
320Enrolled in a Regional Occupational Program (ROP) The student is enrolled in a Regional Occupational Program (ROP), also known as Career Technical Education (CTE), offers tuition-free career preparation training in various occupations. Programs include high demand training such as automotive, construction, office computer skills, information technology training (database design, Web authoring, network administration, and computer repair), health occupations (nurse assistance, dental assistant, EMT, etc.), retail sales, careers with children, and other occupational areas. Most of the training is offered on a high school campus and has an "on-the-job" internship at an employer job site in addition to the classroom training. Participants are mostly high school students with limited spaces for adults.
330Enrolled in a Work Force Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Supported ProgramThe student is enrolled in a Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) program provides workforce development activities designed to enhance the employability, occupational attainment, retention and earnings of adults, dislocated workers and youth. WIOA improves the quality of the workforce, reduces welfare dependency, and enhances the productivity and competitiveness of the California economy.
340Enrolled in a Non-Workability Employment ProgramThe student is in an employment program that is not a part of the federal WorkAbility Program.
350Enrolled in an Adult Training ProgramThe student is enrolled in a training program designed for adults with disabilities.
400Military EnlistmentThe student has enlisted in the armed forces of the United States. This includes active military and military training.
900IncarceratedThe student is in jail or prison.
910Competitively EmployedThe student is participating in competitive employment. Competitive employment means work (i) in the competitive labor market that is preformed on a full-time or part-time basis in an integrated setting; and (ii) for which an individual is compensated at or above minimum wage, but not less than the customary wage and level of benefits paid by the employer for the same or similar work performed by individuals who are not disabled.
920Not Competitively EmployedThe student is NOT participating in competitive employment. Competitive employment means work (i) in the competitive labor market that is preformed on a full-time or part-time basis in an integrated setting; and (ii) for which an individual is compensated at or above minimum wage, but not less than the customary wage and level of benefits paid by the employer for the same or similar work performed by individuals who are not disabled.
930Other employmentThe student is employed in another type of employment not listed in this code set.
940OtherThe student is not employed, not in further education or training, and not in the military.
950Not able to contactThe local educational agency was not able to contact the student to participate in the survey regarding postsecondary program (e.g., university, vocational training, military, etc.) and employment status.
960Refused to answerThe student refused to participate in the survey regarding postsecondary program or employment status (e.g., university, vocational training, military, etc.) .
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
100Temporary SheltersA temporary residence provided for homeless individuals whowould otherwise sleep on the street or a temporary residenceprovided to individuals in emergency situations. This is alsoapplicable to children who are in temporary residences awaitingpermanent placement in foster care.
110Hotels/motelsA temporary residence for homeless individuals usuallyrequiring payment or vouchers for lodging and services on a daily,weekly, or monthly basis.
120Temporarily Doubled UpA temporary residence where a homeless family is sharing thehousing of other persons due to the loss of housing, economichardship, or other similar reasons.
130Temporarily UnshelteredA type of residence for homeless individuals that is not meantfor human habitation, such as cars, parks, sidewalks, abandonedbuildings, campgrounds, trailer parks, bus and train stations, orpersons abandoned in the hospital (on the street). A rule of thumbwould be to see the dwelling as comparable to an automobile in thatit shelters but is not adequate housing.
140Parent or Legal Guardian and/or HomelessAdd
200Permanent HousingA type of fixed and regular residence that is owned, rented, orsublet.
210Foster Family Home or Kinship PlacementA type of residence for homeless individuals that is not meantfor human habitation, such as cars, parks, sidewalks, abandonedbuildings, campgrounds, trailer parks, bus and train stations, orpersons abandoned in the hospital (on the street). A rule of thumbwould be to see the dwelling as comparable to an automobile in thatit shelters but is not adequate housing.
220Licensed Children's InstitutionA type of residence for homeless individuals that is not meantfor human habitation, such as cars, parks, sidewalks, abandonedbuildings, campgrounds, trailer parks, bus and train stations, orpersons abandoned in the hospital (on the street). A rule of thumbwould be to see the dwelling as comparable to an automobile in thatit shelters but is not adequate housing.
230Residential School/ DormitoryA type of residence for homeless individuals that is not meantfor human habitation, such as cars, parks, sidewalks, abandonedbuildings, campgrounds, trailer parks, bus and train stations, orpersons abandoned in the hospital (on the street). A rule of thumbwould be to see the dwelling as comparable to an automobile in thatit shelters but is not adequate housing.
240Health Institution
250Incarceration Institution
260Development Center
270State Hospital
300OtherAny other type of residence not referenced in any other PrimaryResidence Category.
310UnknownThe primary residence of an individual cannot be determined.For example, the information is unavailable or was erroneouslyreported and is indecipherable.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
100American Indian or Alaska NativeA person having origins in any of the original peoples of Northand South America (including Central America), and who maintainstribal affiliation or community attachment.
201ChineseChinese
202JapaneseJapanese
203KoreanKorean
204VietnameseVietnamese
205Asian IndianAsian Indian
206LaotianLaotian
207CambodianCambodian
208HmongHmong
299Other AsianOther Asian
301HawaiianHawaiian
302GuamanianGuamanian
303SamoanSamoan
304TahitianTahitian
399Other Pacific IslanderOther Pacific Islander
400FilipinoA person having origins in the original peoples of thePhilippines. At the state level, this is a Race Ethnicity Category,but for federal reporting purposes, this is considered asub-category of the Asian Race Ethnicity Category.
600Black or African AmericanA person having origins in any of the black racial groups ofAfrica. Terms such as Haitian or Negro can be used in addition toBlack or African American.
700WhiteA person having origins in any of the original peoples ofEurope, the Middle East, or North Africa.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
100American Indian or Alaska Native, Not HispanicA person having origins in any of the original peoples of Northand South America (including Central America), and who maintainstribal affiliation or community attachment.
200Asian, Not HispanicA person having origins in any of the original peoples of theFar East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, forexample, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan,the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam.
300Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, Not HispanicA person having origins in any of the original peoples ofHawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands. The term NativeHawaiian does not include individuals who are native to the Stateof Hawaii by virtue of being born there. In addition to NativeHawaiians, Guamanians, and Samoans, this category would include thefollowing Pacific Islander groups reported in the 1990 census:Carolinian, Fijian, Kosraean, Melanesian, Micronesian, NorthernMariana Islander, Palauan, Papua New Guinean, Ponapean (Pohnpelan),Polynesian, Solomon Islander, Tahitian, Tarawa Islander, Tokelauan,Tongan, Trukese (Chuukese), and Yapese.
500HispanicA person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, South orCentral American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless ofrace. The term, Spanish origin, can be used in addition to Hispanicor Latino.
600Black or African American, Not HispanicA person having origins in any of the black racial groups ofAfrica. Terms such as Haitian or Negro can be used in addition toBlack or African American.
700White, Not HispanicA person having origins in any of the original peoples ofEurope, the Middle East, or North Africa.
800Two or More Races, Not HispanicA person who has identified themselves as two or moreraces.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
CRSCCourse Section CompletionThe record type used to submit course section completiondata.
CRSECourse Section EnrollmentThe record type used to submit course section enrollment data.
PSTSPostsecondary Status
SASSStaff AssignmentThe record type used to submit assignment data for staff.
SCSCStudent Course Section CompletionThe record type used to submit student course sectioncompletion data.
SCSEStudent Course Section EnrollmentThe record type used to submit student course sectionenrollment data.
SDEMStaff DemographicsThe record type used to submit demographic data for staff.
SECLSSID Enrollment Candidate ListThe record type used to submit the SSID Enrollment CandidateList.
SELAStudent English Language AcquisitionThe record type used to sumbit Student English LanguageAcquisition data.
SENRSSID-EnrollmentThe record type used to submit data to create a SSID andmaintain enrollments.
SHTHStudent HealthThe record type used to submit health data for a student.
SIADStudent Information - AddressThe record type used to apply the effective date processingupdates on the Student Address data elements.
SIDMStudent Information - DemographicThe record type used to apply the effective date processingupdates on the Student Demographic data elements.
SIELStudent Information - ELThe record type used to apply the effective date processingupdates on the Student EL data elements.
SIGRStudent Information - GradeThe record type used to apply the effective date processingupdates on the Student Grade data elements.
SINCStudent Incident - All
SINFStudent Information - AllThe record type used to apply the effective date processingupdates on all of the data elements in the record.
SIRSStudent Incident Results
SISTStudent Information - StandingThe record type used to apply the effective date processingupdates on the Student CTE data elements.
SOFFStudent Offense
SPEDSpecial EducationSpecial Education
SPRGStudent ProgramThe record type used to submit program data for a student.
SSRVStudent ServicesStudent Services
STSEStudent Test SettingsStudent Test Settings
SWAVStudent WaiversThe record type used to submit waivers data for a student.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
10ParentAn individual's parent, guardian or caretaker.
20TeacherAn individual who has obtained a credential with the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing with the responsibility of developing, managing or delivering academic instruction.
30Student Study Team/Intervention TeamA student was referred for special education services by a Student Study Team (SST)/Intervention Team, which is a group formed within the school to further examine a student’s academic, behavioral and social-emotional progress.
40Other school/district personnelAn employee of an Educational Service Institution including teachers, administrative staff, and classified staff.
90OtherAn individual other than a parent, guardian, or school/district personnel
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
1Removal by Hearing OfficerThe student was removed by an impartial hearing officer based on a determination that the student's current placement may result in injury to the child or others.
2Removal by School PersonnelThe student was removed by school personnel (other than the IEP team) to an interim alternative educational setting for no more than 45 days.
3No Interim RemovalThe student was not removed and placed in an interim alternative educational setting.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
100Graduated, standard HS diplomaThe student withdrew from/left school after meeting all state and local high school graduation requirements and the district/school has acceptable documentation that the student received a "regular high school diploma" equivalent to the standard high school diploma awarded to the preponderance of students in the State that is fully aligned with the State's standards and does not include a general equivalency diploma, certificate of completion, certificate of attendance, or any other similar or lesser credential, such as a diploma based on meeting Individualized Education Program (IEP) goals, OR as specified in California Education Code (EC) section 51225.1, a student in foster care, a student how is homeless, or a former juvenile court school student who transfers between schools any time after the completion of the pupil's second year of high school, completes all requirements specified in EC Section 51225.3. The exit date must align with the date the student completed the graduation requirements and was awarded a "regular high school diploma."
104Completed all local and state graduation requirements, failedCAHSEEA student who was required to take the California High school Exit Exam (CAHSEE) left school after meeting all other state and local high school graduation requirements, but without passing CAHSEE. The student did not receive a standard high school diploma and there is no evidence that the student is in an academic program leading toward a high school diploma or its equivalent.
106Grad, CAHSEE mods & waiverThe student met all state and local graduation requirements, passing the CAHSEE with a modified passing score and obtained a waiver under Education Code 60851(c)(1)). Education Code 60851(c)(1) waives the requirement to successfully pass the exit examination as a condition of receiving a diploma of graduation or a condition of graduation from high school special education students.
108Grad, CAHSEE exempt108 - Grad, CAHSEE Exemption: The student left school aftermeeting all state and local high school graduation requirements byobtaining an an exemption from passing the California High SchoolExit Exam per Education Code 60852.3(a). Education Code60852.3(a)states: Notwithstanding any other provision of law, commencing withthe 2009-10 school year, an eligible pupil with a disability is notrequired to pass the high school exit examination establishedpursuant to Section 60850 as a condition of receiving a diploma ofgraduation or as a condition of graduation from high school.
120Special Education certificate of completionA student with exceptional needs (having an individualizededucation program [IEP]) left school after receiving a certificateor document of educational achievement or completion meeting therequirements of Education Code Section 56390.
250Adult Ed High School DiplomaThe student withdrew from/left school to enroll in an Adult Education Program and the district/school has acceptable documentation that the student received an adult basic education high school diploma through an adult basic education program. The exit date must align with the date the student completed the requirements.
320Received a High School Equivalency Certificate (and no standardHS diploma)The student withdrew from/left school and the district has acceptable documentation that the student received a High School Equivalency Certificate by passing one or more of the following exams: the General Educational Development (GED) exam, the Test Assessing Secondary Completion (TASC) exam, or the High School Equivalency Test (HiSet).
330Passed CHSPE (and no standard HS diploma)Student left after passing the California High SchoolProficiency Exam (CHSPE), and the district has acceptabledocumentation.
360Completed grade 12 without completing graduation requirements,not gradStudent completed grade 12 or exceeded the maximum age for highschool attendance but did not meet the state and/or local highschool graduation requirements, and there is no evidence that thestudent is in an academic program leading toward a high schooldiploma or its equivalent. This does not include students who didnot graduate because of failure to pass the California High SchoolExit Exam.
480Promoted (matriculated)The student completed the highest grade level offered  at a school (excluding high school completion), left the school, and was expected to attend another California public school. Note. If the student has matriculated but is not expected to return to another California public school, use the exit code most representative of the student's final status (i.e., T200 [TransUS]).
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
10DailyDaily (one or more times a day)
20WeeklyWeekly (one or more times a week)
30MonthlyMonthly (one or more times a month)
40YearlyYearly (one or more times a year)
90OtherAny other frequency or as needed
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
70NoLongerEligReturned to regular education due to no longer eligible for special education or successful completion of Individualized Education Program (IEP), Individual Family Service Plan (IFSP), or Individual Service Plan (ISP).
71HSCompleterStudent left high school after completing their academic program. This includes students who graduated from high school with a regular diploma (no wavier or exemption), with a certificate of completion or other than diploma, or received a high school completion/achievement certificate through general educational development (GED) or the requirements of EC 56390.
73MaxAgeStudent exited special education due to reaching the maximum age for receipt of special education services. This includes students who reached the maximum age and did not receive a diploma.
74DropOutStudent withdrew from/left school, includes attempts to contact unsuccessful, or not known to be continuing.
76TransferredMoved, and known to be continuing, includes transfer to another program.
77DiedStudent died while enrolled in school or student completed the school year, was expected to return, and died during the summer break.
78WithdrawalParent withdrawal or self withdrawal if over 18
83WaiverGraduated from high school with a diploma using a waiver authorized by EC 60851 (c).
84No Parental Consent Received - Part C to BThe parent did not provide consent to transition the student from Part C (Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP)) to Part B (Individualized Education Plan (IEP)).
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
10Part B Initial EvaluationThe Individualized Education Program (IEP)/Individual Service Plan (ISP) team meeting to review the initial evaluation and determine eligibility for special education services for students in Part B.
15Part C Initial EvaluationThe Individual Family Service Plan (IFSP) team meeting to review the initial evaluation and determine eligibility for special education services in Part C.
20Annual Education or Service Plan Meeting The Individual Family Service Plan (IFSP), Individualized Education Program (IEP), or Individual Service Plan (ISP) meeting must occur at least once annually after the initial evaluation date. All data on a student record shall be obtained from the IEP/IFSP/ISP document resulting from this meeting. The purpose of this meeting is to determine the length of time the student has been in the current program, to review the IFSP/IEP/ISP and determine if goals are being met, and to research and analyze historical profiles of students with common characteristics using the past years' data.
30Pending Initial EvaluationThe student received a referral for special education services and the parent provided consent for the initial evaluation, which is pending.
40Triennial EvaluationThe triennial evaluation must occur at least once every three years after the Part B initial evaluation. It is for determination of continued eligibility in special education. The date in this field shall be the date of determination of continued eligibility, which in most or all cases will be an annual evaluation meeting date. This evaluation shall be made more frequently if warranted or if requested by the student’s parents or teacher.Notwithstanding certain procedural requirements, the members of the Individualized Education Program (IEP)/Individual Service Plan (ISP) team may determine continued eligibility without a meeting if all of the following are true:• The members of the IEP/ISP team have previously agreed that determination of continued eligibility is to be based upon a summary of existing data• No new assessment has been conducted• The determination of continued eligibility is not expected to result in any changes to the student’s existing IEP/ISP, and • The student’s parents have not requested an IEP/ISP team meeting for the purpose of determining continued eligibility.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
103Community Based SettingCommunity based settings include, but are not limited to, child care centers (including family day care), preschools, regular nursery school, early childhood center, libraries, grocery stores, parks, restaurants, and community centers (e.g., YMCA, Boys and Girls Clubs) and provide early intervention services in a setting where children without disabilities are typically found.
104Other SettingOther settings include, but are not limited to settings where early intervention services are primarily provided for children with disabilities in a setting that is not home or community based such as a hospital, residential facility, clinic, or English language centers/classes.
200HomeA setting in which special education and related services are primarily provided in the principal residence of the child’s family or caregivers.
201Regular Early Childhood Program or KindergartenThe majority of special education services are provided in a regular early childhood or kindergarten program. Early childhood programs include, but are not limited to:• Head Start• Kindergarten• Reverse mainstream classrooms• Private preschools• Preschool classes offered to an eligible pre-kindergarten population by the public school system• Group childcare
203Separate ClassIn this setting, the student attends a special education program in a class with less than 50% nondisabled children.
204Service Provider LocationThis is the setting when children receive all special education and related services from a service provider, and child did not attend an early childhood program or special education program provided in a separate class, separate school, or residential facility. For example, speech instruction provided in: • Private clinician’s office• Clinician’s offices located in school buildings• Hospital facilities on an outpatient basis• Libraries and other public locations
300Separate SchoolThis is a placement setting where children receive all special education programs in public or private day schools designed specifically for children with disabilities.
301Residential FacilityThis is where children receive all special education and related services in publicly or privately operated residential schools or residential medical facilities on an inpatient basis. This setting does not include children who receive special education programs at the facility but do not live here.
400Regular Classroom/Public Day SchoolThis code value is a program setting that includes at least 50 percent nondisabled children. This is also the setting where the Individualized Education Program (IEP) indicates the student is home schooled or enrolled in an independent charter or virtual charter school.
401Homebound/HospitalThis setting is where students receive special education programs and related services in homebound/hospital environment. Do not include children with disabilities whose parents have opted to home-school them and who receive special education at the public expense.
402Correctional FacilityThis setting includes students who received special education programs in correctional facilities. These data are intended to be a count of all children receiving special education in: • short-term detention facilities (community-based or residential), or• Correctional facilities.
403Parentally Placed in Private SchoolThis setting is where students have been enrolled by parents or guardians in regular, parochial, or other private schools and whose basic education is paid through private resources and who receive special education and related services at public expense from a local educational agency or intermediate educational unit under a service plan. Include children whose parents chose to home-school, but who receive special education and related services at public expense. Do not include children placed in private schools by the Learning Educational Authority (LEA).
500Regular Independent Study or Virtual CharterA setting where a student's IEP indicates the student is in on independent study or enrolled in a virtual charter school (homeschooled). This code value is only applicable to children ages 5-21 years old.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
100Designated Instruction Services (DIS)In California, designated instruction and services are also considered to be developmental, corrective, and other supportive services as are required to assist an individual with exceptional needs (also defined as a "child with a disability") to benefit from special education, and are not offered separately from special education unless State standards consider the service as special education.
200Resource Specialist Program (RSP)As specified in EC 56362, the Resource Specialist Program shall provide, but not limited to, all of the following:• Provision for a resource specialist or specialists who shall provide instruction and services for those pupils whose needs have been identified in an individualized education program developed by the individualized education program team and who are assigned to regular classroom teachers for a majority of a school day.• Provision of information and assistance to individuals with exceptional needs and their parents.• Provision of consultation, resource information, and material regarding individuals with exceptional needs to their parents and to regular staff members.• Coordination of special education services with the regular school programs for each individual with exceptional needs enrolled in the resource specialist program.• Monitoring of pupil progress on a regular basis, participation in the review and revision of individualized education programs, as appropriate, and referral of pupils who do not demonstrate appropriate progress to the individualized education program team.• Emphasis at the secondary school level on academic achievement, career and vocational development, and preparation for adult life.
300Special Day Class (SDC)As specified in Title 5 CCR 3053, a Special Day Class (SDC) is a class composed of individuals whose needs, as specified in the Individual Service Plan (ISP), can be appropriately met within the class.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
210Family Training, Counseling, and Home Visits This service includes: services provided by social workers, psychologists, or other qualified personnel to assist the family in understanding the special needs of the child and enhancing the child’s development.
220Medical ServicesServices provided by a licensed physician to determine a child’s developmental status and need for early intervention services.
230Nutrition ServicesThese services include conducting assessments in: nutritional history and dietary intake; anthropometric, biochemical, and clinical variables; feeding skills and feeding problems; and food habits and food preferences.
240Service CoordinationThis service includes the coordination of special education and related services.
250Special InstructionSpecial instruction includes: the design of learning environments and activities that promote the child’s acquisition of skills in a variety of developmental areas, including cognitive processes and social interaction; curriculum planning, including the planned interaction of personnel, materials, and time and space, that leads to achieving the outcomes in the child’s Individual Family Service Plan (IFSP); providing families with information, skills, and support related to enhancing the skill development of the child; and working with the child to enhance the child’s development.
260Special Education AideParaprofessionals that provide instructional support, which may include the following special education services:(1) provide one-on-one tutoring if such tutoring is scheduled at a time when a student would not otherwise receive instruction from a teacher (2) assist with classroom management, such as organizing instructional and other materials(3) provide instructional assistance in a computer laboratory(4) conduct parental involvement activities(5) provide support in a library or media center(6) act as a translator(7) provide instructional support services under the direct supervision of a teacher
270Respite Care ServicesThrough the IFSP process, short-term care given in-home or out-of-home, which temporarily relieves families of the ongoing responsibility for specialized care for child with a disability.
330Specialized Academic InstructionAdapting, as appropriate, to the needs of the child with a disability the content, methodology, or delivery of instruction to ensure access of the child to the general curriculum, so that he or she can meet the educational standards within the jurisdiction of the public agency that apply to all children. (34 CFR 300.39(b)(3)).
340Intensive Individual ServicesIndividualized Education Program (IEP) Team determination that student requires additional support for all or part of the day to meet his or her IEP goals.
350Individual and Small Group InstructionInstruction delivered one-to-one or in a small group as specified in an IEP enabling the individual(s) to participate effectively in the total school program (30 EC 56441.2, 5 CCR 305.1)
415Language and SpeechServices provide remedial intervention for eligible individuals with difficulty understanding or using spoken language. The difficulty may result from problems with articulation (excluding abnormal swallowing patterns, if that is the sole assessed disability); abnormal voice quality, pitch, or loudness; fluency; hearing loss; or the acquisition, comprehension, or expression of spoken language. Language deficits or speech patterns resulting from unfamiliarity with the English language and from environmental, economic, or cultural factors are not included.Services include: specialized instruction and services, monitoring, reviewing, and consultation. Services may be direct or indirect including the use of a speech consultant.
425Adapted Physical EducationDirect physical education services provided by an adapted physical education specialist to pupils who have needs that cannot be adequately satisfied in other physical education programs as indicated by assessment and evaluation of motor skills performance and other areas of need. It may include individually designed developmental activities, games, sports and rhythms, for strength development and fitness, suited to the capabilities, limitations, and interests of individual students with disabilities who may not safely, successfully or meaningfully engage in unrestricted participation in the vigorous activities of the general or modified physical education program. (CCR Title 5 §3051.5).
435Specialized Physical Health Care ServicesHealth care services means those health services prescribed by the child’s licensed physician and/or surgeon, requiring medically related training of the individual who performs the services and which are necessary during the school day to enable the child to attend school (CCR §3051.12(b)(1)(A)). Specialized physical health care services include but are not limited to suctioning, oxygen administration, catheterization, nebulizer treatments, insulin administration and glucose testing (CEC 49423.5 (d)).
436Health and Nursing: Other ServicesThis includes services that are provided to individuals with exceptional needs by a qualified individual pursuant to an IEP when a student has health problems which require nursing intervention beyond basic school health services. Services include managing the health problem, consulting with staff, group and individual counseling, making appropriate referrals, and maintaining communication with agencies and health care providers. These services do not include any physician-supervised or specialized health care service.IEP-required health and nursing services are expected to supplement the regular health services program. (34 CFR 300.34; CCR Title 5 §3051.12 (a)).
445Assistive Technology ServicesAny specialized training or technical support for the incorporation of assistive devices, adapted computer technology, or specialized media with the educational programs to improve access for students. The term includes a functional analysis of the student's needs for assistive technology; selecting, designing, fitting, customizing, or repairing appropriate devices; coordinating services with assistive technology devices; training or technical assistance for students with a disability, the student's family, individuals providing education or rehabilitation services, and employers. (34 CFR Part 300.6).
450Occupational TherapyIncludes services to improve student's educational performance, postural stability, self-help abilities, sensory processing and organization, environmental adaptation and use of assistive devices, motor planning and coordination, visual perception and integration, social and play abilities, and fine motor abilities.Both direct and indirect services may be provided within the classroom, other educational settings or the home; in a group or on an individual basis; and may include therapeutic techniques to develop abilities; adaptations to the student's environment or curriculum; and consultation and collaboration with other staff and parents. Services are provided, pursuant to an Individualized Education Program (IEP), by a qualified occupational therapist registered with the American Occupational Therapy Certification Board. (CCR Title 5 §. 3051.6, EC Part 30 §56363).
460Physical TherapyThese services are provided, pursuant to an Individualized Education Program (IEP), by a registered physical therapist, or physical therapist assistant, when assessment shows a discrepancy between gross motor performance and other educational skills. Physical therapy includes, but is not limited to, motor control and coordination, posture and balance, self-help, functional mobility, accessibility and use of assistive devices. Services may be provided within the classroom, other educational settings or in the home; and may occur in groups or individually. These services may include adaptations to the student's environment and curriculum, selected therapeutic techniques and activities, and consultation and collaborative interventions with staff and parents. (B&PC Ch. 5.7, CCR Title 5 §3051.6, EC Part 30 §56363, GC-Interagency Agreements Ch. 26.5 §7575(a)(2)).
510Individual CounselingOne-to-one counseling, provided by a qualified individual pursuant to an IEP. Counseling may focus on aspects, such as educational, career, personal; or be with parents or staff members on learning problems or guidance programs for students. Individual counseling is expected to supplement the regular guidance and counseling program. (34 CFR § 300.24(b)(2), (CCR Title 5 §3051.9).
515Counseling and guidanceCounseling in a group setting, provided by a qualified individual pursuant to an IEP. Group counseling is typically social skills development, but may focus on aspects, such as educational, career, personal; or be with parents or staff members on learning problems or guidance programs for students. IEP-required group counseling is expected to supplement the regular guidance and counseling program. (34 CFR §300.24.(b)(2)); CCR Title 5 §3051.9) Guidance services include interpersonal, intrapersonal or family interventions, performed in an individual or group setting by a qualified individual pursuant to an IEP. Specific programs include social skills development, self-esteem building, parent training, and assistance to special education students supervised by staff credentialed to serve special education students. These services are expected to supplement the regular guidance and counseling program. (34 CFR 300.306; CCR Title 5 §3051.9).
520Parent CounselingIndividual or group counseling provided by a qualified individual pursuant to an Individualized Education Program (IEP) to assist the parent(s) of special education students in better understanding and meeting their child's needs; may include parenting skills or other pertinent issues. IEP-required parent counseling is expected to supplement the regular guidance and counseling program. (34 CFR §300.31(b)(7); CCR Title 5 §3051.11).
525Social Work ServicesServices provided pursuant to an Individualized Education Program (IEP) by a qualified individual, includes, but are not limited to, preparing a social or developmental history of a child with a disability; group and individual counseling with the child and family; working with those problems in a child's living situation (home, school, and community) that affect the child's adjustment in school; and mobilizing school and community resources to enable the child to learn as effectively as possible in his or her educational program. Social work services are expected to supplement the regular guidance and counseling program. (34 CFR §300.24(b)(13); CCR Title 5 §3051.13).
530Psychological ServicesThese services, provided by a credentialed or licensed psychologist pursuant to an Individualized Education Program (IEP), include interpreting assessment results to parents and staff in implementing the IEP; obtaining and interpreting information about child behavior and conditions related to learning; planning programs of individual and group counseling and guidance services for children and parents.These services may include consulting with other staff in planning school programs to meet the special needs of children as indicated in the IEP. (CFR Part 300 §300.24).IEP-required psychological services are expected to supplement the regular guidance and counseling program. (34 CFR §300.24; CCR Title 5 §3051.10).
535Behavior Intervention ServicesA systematic implementation of procedures designed to promote lasting, positive changes in the student's behavior resulting in greater access to a variety of community settings, social contacts, public events, and placement in the least restrictive environment. (CCR Title 5 §3001(d)).
540Day Treatment ServicesStructured education, training and support services to address the student’s mental health needs. (Health & Safety Code, Div.2, Chap.3, Article 1, 1502(a)(3)).
545Residential Treatment ServicesA 24-hour out-of-home placement that provides intensive therapeutic services to support the educational program. (Welfare and Institutions Code, Part 2, Chapter 2.5, Art. 1, §5671)).
610Specialized Services for Low Incidence DisabilitiesLow incidence services are defined as those provided to the student population of orthopedically impaired (OI), visually impaired (VI), deaf, hard of hearing (HH), or deaf-blind (DB). Typically, services are provided in education settings by an itinerant teacher or the itinerant teacher/specialist. Consultation is provided to the teacher, staff and parents as needed. These services must be clearly written in the student's Individualized Education Program (IEP), including frequency and duration of the services to the student. (CCR Title 5 §3051.16 & 3051.18).
710Specialized Deaf and Hard of Hearing/Hearing Impairment ServicesThese services include speech therapy, speech reading, auditory training and/or instruction in the student's mode of communication. Rehabilitative and educational services; adapting curricula, methods, and the learning environment; and special consultation to students, parents, teachers, and other school personnel may also be included. (CCR Title 5 §3051.16 and 3051.18).
715Interpreter ServicesSign language interpretation of spoken language to individuals, whose communication is normally sign language, by a qualified sign language interpreter.This includes conveying information through the sign system of the student or consumer and tutoring students regarding class content through the sign system of the student. (CCR Title 5, §3051.16).
720Audiological ServicesThese services include measurements of acuity, monitoring amplification, and frequency modulation system use. Consultation services with teachers, parents or speech pathologists must be identified in the Individualized Education Program (IEP) as to reason, frequency and duration of contact; infrequent contact is considered assistance and would not be included. (CCR Title 5 §3051.2).
725Specialized Vision ServicesThis is a broad category of services provided to students with visual impairments. It includes assessment of functional vision; curriculum modifications necessary to meet the student's educational needs, including Braille, large type, and aural media; instruction in areas of need; concept development and academic skills; communication skills (including alternative modes of reading and writing); social, emotional, career, vocational, and independent living skills.It may include coordination of other personnel providing services to the students (such as transcribers, readers, counselors, orientation and mobility specialists, career/vocational staff, and others) and collaboration with the student's classroom teacher. (CAC Title 5 §3030(d), EC 56364.1).
730Orientation and MobilityStudents with identified visual impairments are trained in body awareness and to understand how to move. Students are trained to develop skills to enable them to travel safely and independently around the school and in the community. It may include consultation services to parents regarding their children requiring such services according to an Individualized Education Program (IEP).
735Braille TranscriptionAny transcription services to convert materials from print to Braille. It may include textbooks, tests, worksheets, or anything necessary for instruction. The transcriber should be qualified in English Braille as well as Nemeth Code (mathematics) and be certified by appropriate agency.
740Specialized Orthopedic ServicesSpecially designed instruction related to the unique needs of students with orthopedic disabilities, including specialized materials and equipment. (CAC Title 5, §3030(e) & 3051.16).
745Reader ServicesAny specialized assistance provided for students who are print-impaired, whether the impairment is the result of a visual disability, other physical disability, or reading disability. This may include but is not limited to, readers provided for examinations, textbooks, and other course related reading assignments and may also include recorded materials.
750Note Taking ServicesAny specialized assistance given to the student for the purpose of taking notes when the student is unable to do so independently. This may include, but is not limited to, copies of notes taken by another student, transcription of tape-recorded information from a class, or aide designated to take notes. This does not include instruction in the process of learning how to take notes.
755Transcription ServicesAny transcription service to convert materials from print to a mode of communication suitable for the student. This may also include dictation services as it may pertain to textbooks, tests, worksheets, or anything necessary for instruction.
760Recreation Services, Includes Therapeutic RecreationTherapeutic recreation and specialized instructional programs designed to assist pupils to become as independent as possible in leisure activities, and when possible and appropriate, facilitate the pupil's integration into general recreation programs. (CAC Title 5, §3051.15; 20 USC 1401(26(A)(1)) (34 CFR 300.24).
820College Awareness PreparationThe result of acts that promote and increase student learning about higher education opportunities, information and options that are available including, but not limited to, career planning, course prerequisites, admission eligibility and financial aid.
830Vocational Assessment, Counseling, Guidance, and Career AssessmentOrganized educational programs that are directly related to the preparation of individuals for paid or unpaid employment and may include provision for work experience, job coaching, development and/or placement, and situational assessment.This includes career counseling to assist student in assessing his/her aptitudes, abilities, and interests in order to make realistic career decisions. (Title 5 §3051.14).
840Career AwarenessTransition services include a provision in paragraph (1)(c)(vi), self-advocacy, career planning, and career guidance. There is a need for coordination between this provision and the Perkins Act to ensure that students with disabilities in middle schools will be able to access vocational education funds. (34 CFR-§300.29).
850Work Experience EducationOrganized educational programs that are directly related to the preparation of individuals for paid or unpaid employment, or for additional preparation for a career requiring other than a baccalaureate or advanced degree. (34 CFR 300.26).
855Job CoachingA service that provides assistance and guidance to an employee who may be experiencing difficulty with one or more aspects of the daily job tasks and functions. The service is provided by a job coach who is highly successful, skilled, and trained on the job who can determine how the employee that is experiencing difficulty learns best and formulate a training plan to improve job performance.
860MentoringA sustained coaching relationship between a student and teacher through on-going involvement and offers support, guidance, encouragement, and assistance as the learner encounters challenges with respect to a particular area such as acquisition of job skills. Mentoring can be either formal as in planned, structured instruction or informal that occurs naturally through friendship, counseling and collegiality in a casual, unplanned way.
865Agency Linkages (referral and placement)Service coordination and case management that facilitates the linkage of individualized education programs under this part and individualized family service plans under part C with individualized service plans under multiple Federal and State programs, such as Title I of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (vocational rehabilitation), Title XIX of the Social Security Act (Medicaid), and Title XVI of the Social Security Act (supplemental security income). (34 CFR §613).
870Travel Training (includes mobility training)Orientation and mobility services-- (i) Means services provided to blind or visually impaired children by qualified personnel to enable those students to attain systematic orientation to and safe movement within their environments in school, home, and community.
890Other Transition ServicesThese services may include program coordination, case management and meetings, and crafting linkages between schools and between schools and postsecondary agencies.
900Other Special Education/Related ServiceAny other specialized service required for a student with a disability to receive educational benefit. This service must be included in the California Department of Education (CDE) approved Local Plan.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
210Home, instruction based on IEP team determination An alternative to classroom instruction. An Individualized Education Program (IEP) team decision states and certifies that the student's diagnosed condition prevents him/her from attending a school setting. Instruction may be delivered individually, in small groups, or by teleclass. (Title V, §3051.4).
220HospitalA public hospital, state licensed children's hospital, psychiatric hospital, proprietary hospital, or a health facility for medical purposes. (EC 56167-56168).
310Head Start programA part-day comprehensive child development program for children three to five years of age from low-income families. Services are provided in this program through four components: education, social services, parent involvement, and health. Head Start is mandated to make a minimum of 10% of its enrollment opportunities available for preschool age children with disabilities.
320Child development or child care facilityAny residence or building, or part thereof, in which child care and development services are provided. The facility must be licensed by the California Department of Social Services.
330Public preschoolA public preschool program such as a state preschool program or Head Start Program.
340Private preschoolA preschool operated by a private agency, that provides basic supervision, age appropriate activities, nutrition, and parent education for preschool children.
350Extended day careAn extended school day program that provides educational activities that are appropriate to the ages of the students and that capture the students' interests and needs. (EC 58752).
360Residential facilityA public or private residential facility for students who receive special education for more than 50 percent of the school day.
510Regular classroom/public day schoolDay schools operated or administered by a public agency to provide instruction in general education. This includes schools listed in the California Public Schools Directory published by the California Department of Education (CDE). This category does not include residential school or other types of schools listed under this Field.
520Separate classroom in public integrated facilityThe special education service is being provided at the public school site where the student is primarily enrolled, in a classroom separate from students without disabilities.
530State Special SchoolThe special education service is being provided at a State Special School (CA School for the Blind or CA School for the Deaf).
540Special Education Center or facilityA separate school operated by an LEA for students with disabilities. (USC 1412(a) (5) (A).
550Public residential schoolSchools operated or administered by a public agency to provide instruction in general education, where students reside at the same location. This category does not include any other types of schools listed under this field.
560Other public school or facilityAny other setting (e.g., a store-front transition program) where an LEA may provide special education services, including community facilities, off-campus classrooms, etc. (EC 56361(g), USC 1401(29)(A)).
570Charter schools Charter schools that are deemed to be a public school within the district/SELPA participate in either the same manner as other schools within the district or as described in a memorandum of understanding.
610Continuation schoolPrimarily serve students sixteen through eighteen years old by providing individualized instruction and flexible scheduling to meet individual graduation needs, while allowing students to comply with the compulsory part-time attendance laws. It also is mandated to provide guidance, placement, and follow-up services to students. (EC 48400-48454, CAC Title 5 §11000-11010).
620Alternative work education center/work study An alternative program to teach basic academic skills, with emphasis on the improvement of student motivation for achievement in order to obtain employment or to return to regular high school. Center will operate on a clinical, client-centered basis, and provide classroom instruction, on-the-job training, career counseling, and placement services. (EC 52900). The center may also provide appropriate educational services to school dropouts through recruitment or referral. These services may include: instruction in basic academic skills, motivation, employment, or re-entry orientation. The goal is to transition to public school, diploma equivalency program, vocational program, military or other service program, or postsecondary education. In addition, a program administered by the Student Aid Commission to provide an opportunity for college students to earn money while gaining experience in educationally beneficial or career-related employment. (EC 69951).
630Juvenile court schoolAn alternative program that serves the educational needs of students who are under the protection or authority of the Juvenile Court or local school district. The County Office of Education provides for the education programs in juvenile ranches, camps, and schools, as well as juvenile halls. Students are placed in juvenile court schools when referred by the juvenile court or a deputy probation officer. These programs seek to transition the students back to an appropriate educational, training, and/or employment setting upon release or after the court terminates jurisdiction. (W&IC §202 et seq., EC §1980 et seq.).
640Community schoolAn alternative program that serves the educational needs of students. The County Office of Education provides for the education programs in community schools. Students are placed in community schools when expelled from school, or referred by a School Attendance Review Board (SARB). These programs seek to transition the students back to an appropriate educational, training, and/or employment setting. This also includes district operated community schools.
650Correctional institution or facilityAn institution run by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Juvenile Justice, or any other public agency where an individual is detained for infraction with the law and where educational classes provide instruction in civic, vocational, literacy, health, homemaking, technical, and general education.
710Community collegeThis includes specialized services and educational programs offered by the postsecondary community colleges for students over high school age in academics, reading and mathematics labs, and vocational, career, and community development skills.
720Adult education facilityA facility where these subjects are taught: parenting, basic education, high school diploma, English as a second language, citizenship, short-term vocational programs, older adults, adults with disabilities, home economics education, and health and safety in order to provide or improve the skills of adults.
810Nonpublic day schoolA nonpublic, nonsectarian day school (under the Field SCH_TYPE) that enrolls individuals with exceptional needs pursuant to an individualized education program, employs at least one special educator, and is certified by the California Department of Education (CDE). (EC 56034).
820Nonpublic residential school, in CaliforniaA nonpublic, nonsectarian school in California that enrolls individuals with exceptional needs pursuant to an individualized education program, employs at least one special educator, and is certified by the California Department of Education (CDE). This school provides an educational program at the same location where the student resides (often a licensed children's institution). (EC 56034).
830Nonpublic residential school, outside CaliforniaA nonpublic, nonsectarian school outside of California that enrolls individuals with exceptional needs pursuant to an individualized education program, employs at least one special educator, and is certified by the California Department of Education (CDE). This school provides an educational program at the same location where the student resides (often a licensed children's institution). (EC 56034).
840Private day school (not certified by Special Education Division) A school, sectarian or nonsectarian, which is not administered by a public agency and does not provide special education services. Students attending this school do not reside at the school premises. Services are provided through an Individual Service Plan (ISP), in accordance with district policy for serving students in private schools.
850Private residential school (not certified by Special Education Division) A school, sectarian or nonsectarian, which is not administered by a public agency, and does not provide special education and services. The student resides at this school, although private residential schools may provide a combination of residential and day programs. The status of a student (whether day or residential) will depend on where the student resides. Services are provided through an Individual Service Plan (ISP), in accordance with district policy for serving students in private schools.
860Parochial schoolA school that is affiliated with or run by a religious organization.
890Service provider locationThe special education service is being provided at the same location that the service provider is located (e.g., regional center, child development program, etc.).
900OtherAny other setting (e.g., a store-front transition program) where an LEA may provide special education services, including community facilities, off-campus classrooms, etc. (EC 56361(g), USC 1401(29)(A)).
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
100District of ServiceThe district that is providing the majority of the services.
110County Office of EducationCounty offices of education provide services to school districts statewide by performing tasks that can be done more efficiently and economically at the county level. County offices provide or help formulate new curricula, staff development and training programs, and instructional procedures; design business and personnel systems; and perform many other services to meet changing needs and requirements. When economic or technical conditions make county or regional services most appropriate for students, county offices provide a wide range of services, including special and vocational education, programs for youths at risk of failure, and instruction in juvenile detention facilities. They are also responsible for monitoring districts for adequate textbooks, facilities, and teacher qualifications. The county offices have elected governing boards and are administered by elected or appointed county superintendents.
120SELPAThe Special Education Local Plan Areas (SELPA) are dedicated to the belief that all students can learn and that special needs students must be guaranteed equal opportunity to become contributing members of society. SELPAs facilitate high quality educational programs and services for special needs students and training for parents and educators. The SELPA collaborates with county agencies and school districts to develop and maintain healthy and enriching environments in which special needs students and families can live and succeed.
130Another district, county, or SELPAA special education service is being provided by a local educational agency (district, county, charter school, or SELPA) that is different from the primary District of Service is providing a special education service.
200WorkAbility I (WAI)The WorkAbility I (WAI) program provides comprehensive pre-employment skills training, employment placement and follow-up for high school students in special education who are making the transition from school to work, independent living and postsecondary education or training. Program services are appropriate to individual student needs, abilities, and interests. The WAI program offers students with an Individualized Education Program (IEP) the opportunity to complete their secondary education while also obtaining marketable job skills. WAI provides secondary students with an understanding of job seeking and job keeping skills. The employability of students improves through occupational class training and on-the-job subsidized or unsubsidized work experience.
210Transition Partnership Program (TPP)The Transition Partnership Program (TPP), in collaboration with the Department of Rehabilitation, is designed to help students as they move out of Special Education and into a career. More than 350 students from participating school districts join the program each year. TPP provides a two-semester course that includes decision-making skills, interest assessment, career exploration and job preparation.  Support continues after high school and may include job placement assistance and vocational training or financial assistance to purchase job-required tools or uniforms.
220Regional CenterA special education service is being provided by a regional center (nonprofit private corporations that contract with the Department of Developmental Services to provide or coordinate services and supports for individuals with developmental disabilities).
230Alcohol and drug prevention programsA special education service is being provided by an alcohol or drug prevention program.
240Child development funded programA special education service is being provided by a child development agency that is funded by the California Department of Education.
250Head StartHead Start promotes the school readiness of young children from low-income families through agencies in their local community. It support the mental, social, and emotional development of children from birth to age 5. In addition to education services, programs provide children and their families with health, nutrition, social, and other services. Head Start services are responsive to each child and family's ethnic, cultural, and linguistic heritage. Head Start encourages the role of parents as their child's first and most important teachers. Programs build relationships with families that support positive parent-child relationships, family well-being, and connections to peers and community.
300California Department of Public Health, Division of Mental Health ServicesThe California Department of Public Health, Division of Mental Health Services, provides oversight of mental health service providers for students with disabilities.
310California Children’s Services (CCS)California Children's Services (CCS) is a state program for children with certain diseases or health problems. Through this program, children up to 21 years old can get the health care and services they need.
320California Department of Social Services (DSS)The California Department of Social Services provides oversight of social services provided to students with disabilities.
330California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR)The California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) is an employment and independent living resource for people with disabilities.
340Employment Development Department (EDD)The California Employment Development Department provides employment services for students with disabilities.
400Nonpublic agency (NPA) under contract with SELPA or districtA nonpublic, nonsectarian agency (NPA) is a private, nonsectarian (not affiliated with or restricted to a particular religious group) establishment or individual that provides related services necessary for a pupil with exceptional needs to benefit educationally from the pupils’ individualized education program (IEP). This does not include an organization or agency that operates as a public agency or offers public service, including, but not limited to, a state or local agency, an affiliate of a state or local agency, including a private, nonprofit corporation established or operated by a state or local agency, a public university or college, or a public hospital.
410Nonpublic school (NPS) under contract with SELPA or districtA nonpublic, nonsectarian school (NPS) serves as an alternative special education service available to districts, special education local plan areas (SELPAs), county offices of education, and parent(s)/guardian(s). Nonsectarian means not affiliated with or restricted to a particular religious group. The NPS must provide pupils in kindergarten through eighth grade with state-adopted, standards-based core curriculum, and instructional materials. Provide pupils from ninth through twelfth grade with standards-based, core curriculum, and instructional materials used by any LEA that contracts with the NPS (California schools only).
500Other Public ProgramA special education service is being provided by a public program not represented in this code set.
600Other Private ProgramA special education service is being provided by a private program not represented in this code set.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
CA-ABAlbertaThe Canadian province of Alberta.
CA-BCBritish ColumbiaThe Canadian province of British Columbia.
CA-MBManitobaThe Canadian province of Manitoba.
CA-NBNew BrunswickThe Canadian province of New Brunswick.
CA-NLNewfoundland and LabradorThe Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador.
CA-NSNova ScotiaThe Canadian province of Nova Scotia.
CA-NTNorthwest TerritoriesThe Canadian province of Northwest Territories.
CA-NUNunavutThe Canadian province of Nunavut.
CA-ONOntarioThe Canadian province of Ontario.
CA-PEPrince Edward IslandThe Canadian province of Prince Edward Island.
CA-QCQuebecThe Canadian province of Quebec.
CA-SKSaskatchewanThe Canadian province of Saskatchewan.
CA-YTYukon TerritoryThe Canadian province of Yukon Territory.
MX-AGUAguascalientesThe Mexican state of Aguascalientes
MX-BCNBaja CaliforniaThe Mexican state of Baja California
MX-BCSBaja California SurThe Mexican state of Baja California Sur
MX-CAMCampecheThe Mexican state of Campeche
MX-CHHChihuahuaThe Mexican state of Chihuahua
MX-CHPChiapasThe Mexican state of Chiapas
MX-COACoahuilaThe Mexican state of Coahuila
MX-COLColimaThe Mexican state of Colima
MX-DIFDistrito FederalThe Mexican state of Distrito Federal
MX-DURDurangoThe Mexican state of Durango
MX-GROGuerreroThe Mexican state of Guerrero
MX-GUAGuanajuatoThe Mexican state of Guanajuato
MX-HIDHidalgoThe Mexican state of Hidalgo
MX-JALJaliscoThe Mexican state of Jalisco
MX-MEXMexicoThe Mexican state of Mexico
MX-MICMichoacanThe Mexican state of Michoacan
MX-MORMorelosThe Mexican state of Morelos
MX-NAYNayaritThe Mexican state of Nayarit
MX-NLENuevo LeonThe Mexican state of Nuevo Leon
MX-OAXOaxacaThe Mexican state of Oaxaca
MX-PUEPueblaThe Mexican state of Puebla
MX-QUEQuerΘtaroThe Mexican state of Queretaro
MX-ROOQuintana RooThe Mexican state of Quintana Roo
MX-SINSinaloaThe Mexican state of Sinaloa
MX-SLPSan Luis PotosiThe Mexican state of San Luis Potosφ
MX-SONSonoraThe Mexican state of Sonora
MX-TABTabascoThe Mexican state of Tabasco
MX-TAMTamaulipasThe Mexican state of Tamaulipas
MX-TLATlaxcalaThe Mexican state of Tlaxcala
MX-VERVeracruzThe Mexican state of Veracruz
MX-YUCYucatanThe Mexican state of Yucatan
MX-ZACZacatecasThe Mexican state of Zacatecas
US-AAArmed Forces AmericasThe American state or territory of Armed Forces Americas.
US-AEArmed Forces Europe, Middle East, & CanadaThe American state or territory of Armed Forces Europe, MiddleEast, & Canada.
US-AKAlaskaThe American state or territory of Alaska.
US-ALAlabamaThe American state or territory of Alabama.
US-APArmed Forces PacificThe American state or territory of Armed Forces Pacific.
US-ARArkansasThe American state or territory of Arkansas.
US-ASAmerican SamoaThe American state or territory of American Samoa.
US-AZArizonaThe American state or territory of Arizona.
US-CACaliforniaThe American state or territory of California.
US-COColoradoThe American state or territory of Colorado.
US-CTConnecticutThe American state or territory of Connecticut.
US-DCDistrict of ColumbiaThe American state or territory of District of Columbia.
US-DEDelawareThe American state or territory of Delaware.
US-FLFloridaThe American state or territory of Florida.
US-FMFederated States of MicronesiaThe American state or territory of Federated States ofMicronesia.
US-GAGeorgiaThe American state or territory of Georgia.
US-GUGuamThe American state or territory of Guam.
US-HIHawaiiThe American state or territory of Hawaii.
US-IAIowaThe American state or territory of Iowa.
US-IDIdahoThe American state or territory of Idaho.
US-ILIllinoisThe American state or territory of Illinois.
US-INIndianaThe American state or territory of Indiana.
US-KSKansasThe American state or territory of Kansas.
US-KYKentuckyThe American state or territory of Kentucky.
US-LALouisianaThe American state or territory of Louisiana.
US-MAMassachusettsThe American state or territory of Massachusetts.
US-MDMarylandThe American state or territory of Maryland.
US-MEMaineThe American state or territory of Maine.
US-MHMarshall IslandsThe American state or territory of Marshall Islands.
US-MIMichiganThe American state or territory of Michigan.
US-MNMinnesotaThe American state or territory of Minnesota.
US-MOMissouriThe American state or territory of Missouri.
US-MPNorthern Mariana IslandsThe American state or territory of Northern MarianaIslands.
US-MSMississippiThe American state or territory of Mississippi.
US-MTMontanaThe American state or territory of Montana.
US-NCNorth CarolinaThe American state or territory of North Carolina.
US-NDNorth DakotaThe American state or territory of North Dakota.
US-NENebraskaThe American state or territory of Nebraska.
US-NHNew HampshireThe American state or territory of New Hampshire.
US-NJNew JerseyThe American state or territory of New Jersey.
US-NMNew MexicoThe American state or territory of New Mexico.
US-NVNevadaThe American state or territory of Nevada.
US-NYNew YorkThe American state or territory of New York.
US-OHOhioThe American state or territory of Ohio.
US-OKOklahomaThe American state or territory of Oklahoma.
US-OROregonThe American state or territory of Oregon.
US-PAPennsylvaniaThe American state or territory of Pennsylvania.
US-PRPuerto RicoThe American state or territory of Puerto Rico.
US-PWPalauThe American state or territory of Palau.
US-RIRhode IslandThe American state or territory of Rhode Island.
US-SCSouth CarolinaThe American state or territory of South Carolina.
US-SDSouth DakotaThe American state or territory of South Dakota.
US-TNTennesseeThe American state or territory of Tennessee.
US-TXTexasThe American state or territory of Texas.
US-UTUtahThe American state or territory of Utah.
US-VAVirginiaThe American state or territory of Virginia.
US-VIVirgin IslandsThe American state or territory of Virgin Islands.
US-VTVermontThe American state or territory of Vermont.
US-WAWashingtonThe American state or territory of Washington.
US-WIWisconsinThe American state or territory of Wisconsin.
US-WVWest VirginiaThe American state or territory of West Virginia.
US-WYWyomingThe American state or territory of Wyoming.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
E125PriorComplSpecEdStudent exited a special education transition program and was previously reported as receiving a special education certificate of completion, passing the California High School Proficiency Examination (CHSPE), or passing the General Educational Development (GED) test.
E130DiedStudent died while enrolled in school or student completed the school year, was expected to return, and died during the summer break and the district/school has supporting written documentation.
E140NoKnownEnrollTruantThe student, age six up until age 18, is truant as defined by Education Code Section 48260 (a), and: (1) has been referred to a local or county School Attendance Review Board (SARB) by the local educational agency (LEA) after the LEA has taken all statutory truancy intervention steps; or (2) cannot be located by the LEA after the LEA has completed a full investigation as to the whereabouts of the student.
E150MidYearEnrollmentUpdateThe student is not exiting the schoolbut the one or more of the following pieces of information about the student is being updated:
• Grade level, greater than 14 days before the end of the school year; or
• Student School Transfer Code; or
• District of Geographic Residence, or
• Enrollment Status Code

If the student exited and left the school use the appropriate exit code, for example:
• T160-Transfer to another CA school; or
• E155 [YearEndGradeLevelExit] if a grade level exit took place during the last 14 days of the academic year because of summer break or year-end intersession.
• E230 [Completer Exit] and School Completion Status=480 [Promoted/ Matriculated] and not E155 if the student completed the grade that is being exited and that grade-level is the last grade offered at the school.
E155YearEndEnrlmntExitSameSchlThe student exited a grade level (excluding high school completion) during the last 14 days of the current academic year because of summer break or year-end intersession . This exit code is to be used for students thought to be returning to the school. If the student is completing the school year, but known to be transferring to another school or some other type of exit, use the appropriate exit code (for example T160 Transfer to another California school).
The grade level exit at the end of the year indicates only that the student exited the grade level at the end of the year. The student's enrollment for the next academic year may be either a grade-level promotion, grade retention, or grade demotion.
Note: If the student completed the last grade offered at the school, use Student Exit Category=E230 [Completer Exit] and School Completion Status=480 [Promoted/ Matriculated] instead of this code.
E170SecEnrlExitStudent who was enrolled with a secondary Enrollment Status Code (20) in any grade, exited/withdrew from school.
E230CompleterExitStudent left school after completing their academic program at this school, whether or not the completion resulted in high school graduation. This includes students who reach the maximum age for high school but do not have enough credits to graduate.
E300ExpellNoKnownEnrollStudent left school after being expelled, was subsequently referred to another educational service institution, but never showed up, and attempts to locate the student were unsuccessful. Do NOT use this code if the district took the appropriate steps to refer the student to the Student Attendance Review Board (SARB); use E140 (TruantNoKnownEnroll). Only use this code if the student was exited without first being referred to the SARB.
E400OtherOrUnknownThe student withdrew from/left school for reasons that cannot be determined or for reasons other that those described in the Student Exit Category codes. Do NOT use this code for students who were referred for truancy intervention, as outlined in E140 (NoKnownEnrollTruant).
E410MedicalRsnsStudent withdrew from/left school due to medical reasons.
E450PreK-6ExitInfant or student in pre-kindergarten through grade six exited/withdrew from school; or the student exited school during a temporary break such as summer vacation or year-round intersession, but was expected to return to the same school after the break.
E490Summer or Intersession ExitThe student exited school during a temporary break such as summer vacation or year-round intersession, but was expected to return to the same school after the break.
N420NoShowSameSchlStudent completed an academic year at a school and did not return to the same school the following year when the student was expected to return and no other exit code is appropriate.
N430NoShowMatricSchlNo show, matriculating. Student successfully completed a grade level in a school and did not attend the school of matriculation where the student was expected to attend. For example, a student who completed 8th grade at a junior high and did not show up at the expected comprehensive high school. Note: This code is to be used by the receiving school that expected the student to enroll.
N470NoShowThe student’s enrollment was exited because the student, who has no prior enrollments in the school, was pre-enrolled but did not show up as expected to attend the school. This exit represents a nullification of the pre-enrollment and should only be used for a student’s: (1) first enrollment in CALPADS (e.g. kindergarten students or transfer students from a private school or a school outside of California; or (2) first time enrollment in a school as a result of matriculation from another school.
T160TransCASchlRegularThe student withdrew from/left school and the district has acceptable documentation that the student has transferred (not referred by a school or district) to another California public school (within or outside the district), including transfers to a non-sectarian, non-public certified (NPS) school. Transfers that are a result of referrals made by a school or district are to be coded as T165 or T167 as appropriate.
T165TransSpecDiscRsnsOrJudgThe student was withdrawn from one school due to specified disciplinary reasons, and transferred to another California public school (within or outside the district). The district has acceptable documentation of this transfer. The specified disciplinary reasons include: referral by a juvenile court judge or other correctional or judicial official; or expulsions pursuant to Education Code Section 48915 (a), (b), or (c) and where the student is known to be enrolled in another institution.Do NOT use this code if: - student is expelled and referred to an alternative education program for disciplinary reasons other than those specified in Education Code Section 48915 (a), (b), or (c). (use T167 [TransAltSchlPgm]) - an expelled student is NOT known to be enrolled in another institution (use E300 [ExpelledNoKnownEnroll]) - a truant student has not been attending and has been referred for truancy intervention (use E140 [NoKnownEnrollTruant]) - a student is referred by the school or district to an alternative education program for non-disciplinary reasons. (use T167 [TransAltSchlPrgml]) - a student is transferred voluntarily, without a referral and for non-disciplinary reasons. (use T160 [TransCASchlRegular])
T167TransAltSchlPrgmThe student was referred by a school and/or school district and the district has acceptable documentation that the student enrolled to enroll in an alternative education school or voluntarily transferred to an independent study program in another California public school in the same district or in a different district for one of the following reasons: (1) a student was referred or voluntarily transferred to an independent study program for non-disciplinary reasons; or (2) The student was referred by school and/or school district to withdraw from/leave school and transfer to an alternative education school or to a non-alternative education school independent study program for any disciplinary reason except those specified in T165. Do NOT use this code for: (1) - interdistrict transfers (i.e., formal agreement pursuant to Education Code Section 46600, NCLB public school choice-program improvement, NCLB public school choice-persistently dangerous, district of choice transfers pursuant to Education Code Section 48313); or (2) - students who are referred to an alternative education school or independent study program for disciplinary reasons by a juvenile court judge or other correctional or judicial officer or who are expelled pursuant to Education Code Section 48915 (a), (b), or (c). (Use T165)
T180TransPrivateStudent withdrew from/left school and the district has received acceptable documentation of enrollment in a private school in California. Do not use this code for transfers to a non-sectarian school. Student Exit Category Code T160 (TransCASchlRegular) should be used.
T200TransUSStudent withdrew from/left school and the district has received "official written documentation" that the student has transferred to another public or private U.S. school outside California.
T240TransOutUSStudent withdrew from/left school to move to another country and the district/school has supporting written documentation.
T260TransInAdultStudent withdrew from/left school to enroll in an adult education program.
T280TransCollegeStudent withdrew from/left school to enroll in college.
T370TransInstHSDiplStudent withdrew from/left school to enroll in another program that is not primarily academic (military, job corps, justice system, etc., and not an adult education program) and the student is participating in an educational program from which they can expect to earn a “regular high school diploma” equivalent to the standard high school diploma awarded to the preponderance of students in a State that is fully aligned with the State’s standards and does not include a general equivalency diploma, certificate of completion, certificate of attendance, or any other similar or lesser credential, such as a diploma based on meeting Individualized Education Program (IEP) goals. A student who is in a prison or in a juvenile facility awaiting a hearing or release and not yet adjudicated as delinquent may not be removed from the cohort of the sending school or district. Instead, the school or district must wait until the student has received such adjudication and determined that the student will transfer to a facility that has a school or educational program from which the student can expect to receive a “regular high school diploma.” The district is required to obtain and maintain acceptable written documentation of this transfer.
T380TransInstNoHSDipStudent withdrew from/left school to enroll in another program that is not primarily academic (military, job corps, justice system, etc.) and the student is not participating in an educational program from which they can expect to earn a "regular high school diploma" equivalent to the standard high school diploma awarded to the preponderance of students in a State that is fully aligned with the State's standards and does not include a general equivalency diploma, certificate of completion, certificate of attendance, or any other similar or lesser credential, such as a diploma based on meeting IEP goals.

NOTE Since Jan 1, 2015, students reprimanded for "willful defiance" in grades K-3 may not be suspended or expelled for that reason alone, nor can students grades 4-12 be expelled (though they can be suspended) for "willful defiance."

Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
100Out-of-School SuspensionEducation Code Section 48925(d) removal of a pupil from ongoing instruction for adjustment purposes. However, suspension does not mean any of the following: (1) Reassignment to another education program or class at the same school where the pupil will receive continuing instruction for the length of day prescribed by the governing board for pupils of the same grade level. (2) Referral to a certificated employee designated by the principal to advise pupils. (3) Removal from the class, but without reassignment to another class or program, for the remainder of the class period without sending the pupil to the principal or the principal's designee as provided in Section 48910. Removal from a particular class shall not occur more than once every five schooldays.
110In-School SuspensionDetermined and established by local districts as a supervised in-school suspension classroom for students who are suspended and do not pose an imminent danger or threat or have not been recommended for expulsion as provided in Education Code Section 48911.1.
200ExpulsionEducation Code Section 48925(b) removal of a pupil from (1) the immediate supervision and control, or (2) the general supervision, of school personnel, as those terms are used in (Education Code) Section 46300.
300Other Means of Correction or No ActionAn individual was involved with a specific incident but was disciplined with an action other than suspension or expulsion (including no disciplinary action at all).
400No Action
501Physical Restraint
502Mechanical Restraint
600Seclusion
700School Related Arrest
800Law Enforcement Referral
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
100Possession, Sale, Furnishing a FirearmEC 48915(c)(1)Possessing, selling, or otherwise furnishing afirearm. This subdivision does not apply to an act of possessing afirearm if the pupil had obtained prior written permission topossess the firearm from a certificated school employee, which isconcurred in by the principal or the designee of the principal.This subdivision applies to an act of possessing a firearm only ifthe possession is verified by an employee of a schooldistrict.
101Possession, Sale, Furnishing a Firearm, Knife, Explosive, orOther Dangerous ObjectEC 48900(b) Possessed, sold, or otherwise furnished anyfirearm, knife, explosive, or other dangerous object, unless, inthe case of possession of any object of this type, the pupil hadobtained written permission to possess the item from a certificatedschool employee, which is concurred in by the principal or thedesignee of the principal.
102Possession of an Imitation FirearmEC 48900(m) Possessed an imitation firearm. As used in thissection, imitation firearm means a replica of a firearm that is sosubstantially similar in physical properties to an existing firearmas to lead a reasonable person to conclude that the replica is afirearm.
103Brandishing a KnifeEC 48915(c)(2) Brandishing a knife at another person.
104Possession of a Knife or Dangerous ObjectEC 48915(a)(1)(B) Possession of any knife or other dangerousobject of no reasonable use to the pupil.
105Possession of an ExplosiveEC 48915(c)(5) Possession of an explosive
200Sale of Controlled SubstanceEC 48915(c)(3) Unlawfully selling a controlled substance listedin Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 11053) of Division 10 of theHealth and Safety Code.
201Possession of Controlled SubstanceEC 48915(a)(1)(C) Unlawful possession of any controlledsubstance listed in Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 11053) ofDivision 10 of the Health and Safety Code, except for the firstoffense for the possession of not more than one avoirdupois ounceof marijuana, other than concentrated cannabis.
202Possession, Use, Sale, or Furnishing a Controlled Substance,Alcohol, IntoxicantEC 48900(c) Unlawfully possessed, used, sold, or otherwisefurnished, or been under the influence of, any controlled substancelisted in Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 11053) of Division 10of the Health and Safety Code, an alcoholic beverage, or anintoxicant of any kind.
203Offering, Arranging, or Negotiating Sale of ControlledSubstances, Alcohol, IntoxicantsEC 48900(d) Unlawfully offered, arranged, or negotiated to sellany controlled substance listed in Chapter 2 (commencing withSection 11053) of Division 10 of the Health and Safety Code, analcoholic beverage, or an intoxicant of any kind, and either sold,delivered, or otherwise furnished to any person another liquid,substance, or material and represented the liquid, substance, ormaterial as a controlled substance, alcoholic beverage, orintoxicant.
204Offering, Arranging, or Negotiating Sale of DrugParaphernaliaEC 48900(j) Unlawfully possessed or unlawfully offered,arranged, or negotiated to sell any drug paraphernalia, as definedin Section 11014.5 of the Health and Safety Code.
205Offering, Arranging, or Negotiating Sale of SomaEC 48900(p): Unlawfully offered, arranged to sell, negotiatedto sell, or sold the prescription drug Soma.
300Possession or Use of Tobacco ProductsEC 48900(h) Possessed or used tobacco, or any productscontaining tobacco or nicotine products, including, but not limitedto, cigarettes, cigars, miniature cigars, clove cigarettes,smokeless tobacco, snuff, chew packets, and betel. However, thissection does not prohibit use or possession by a pupil of his orher own prescription products.
400Sexual BatteryEC 48915(c)(4) committing a sexual battery as defined insubdivision (n) of Section 48900. 48900(n) committed a sexualbattery as defined in Section 243.4 of the Penal Code.
401Sexual AssaultEC 48915(c)(4) Committing or attempting to commit a sexualassault as defined in subdivision (n) of Section 48900. 48900(n)committed or attempted to commit a sexual assault as defined inSection 261, 266c, 286, 288, 288a, or 289 of the Penal Code.
403Sexual HarassmentEC 48900.2 and 212.5 For the purposes of this chapter, theconduct described in Section 212.5 must be considered by areasonable person of the same gender as the victim to besufficiently severe or pervasive to have a negative impact upon theindividual's academic performance or to create an intimidating,hostile, or offensive educational environment. This section shallnot apply to pupils enrolled in kindergarten and grades 1 to 3,inclusive.Sexual harassment means unwelcome sexual advances,requests for sexual favors, and other verbal, visual, or physicalconduct of a sexual nature, made by someone from or in the work oreducational setting, under any of the following conditions: (a)Submission to the conduct is explicitly or implicitly made a termor a condition of an individual's employment, academic status, orprogress. (b) Submission to, or rejection of, the conduct by theindividuals used as the basis of employment or academic decisionsaffecting the individual. (c) The conduct has the purpose or effectof having a negative impact upon the individual's work or academicperformance, or of creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensivework or educational environment. (d) Submission to, or rejectionof, the conduct by the individual is used as the basis for anydecision affecting the individual regarding benefits and services,honors, programs, or activities available at or through theeducational institution.
500Caused Physical InjuryEC 48915(a)(1)(A) Causing serious physical injury to anotherperson, except in self-defense.
501Caused, Attempted, or Threatened Physical InjuryEC 48900(a)(1) Caused, attempted to cause, or threatenedserious physical injury to another person .
502Aided or Abetted Physical InjuryEC 48900(t) A pupil who aids or abets, as defined in Section 31of the Penal Code, the infliction or attempted infliction ofphysical injury to another person may suffer suspension, but notexpulsion, pursuant to this section, except that a pupil who hasbeen adjudged by a juvenile court to have committed, as an aiderand abettor, a crime of physical violence in which the victimsuffered great bodily injury or serious bodily injury shall besubject to discipline pursuant to subdivision (a).
503Committed Assault or Battery on a School EmployeeEC 48915(a)(1)(E) Assault or battery, as defined in Sections240 and 242 of the Penal Code, upon any school employee.
504Used Force or ViolenceEC 48900(a)(2) Willfully used force or violence upon the personof another, except in self-defense.
505Committed an act of Hate ViolenceEC 48900.3: In addition to the reasons set forth in Sections48900 and 48900.2, a pupil in any of grades 4 to 12, inclusive, maybe suspended from school or recommended for expulsion if thesuperintendent or the principal of the school in which the pupil isenrolled determines that the pupil has caused, attempted to cause,threatened to cause, or participated in an act of, hate violence,as defined in subdivision (e) of Section 233.
506Harassment or IntimidationEC 48900.4: In addition to the grounds specified in Sections48900 and 48900.2, a pupil enrolled in any of grades 4 to 12,inclusive, may be suspended from school or recommended forexpulsion if the superintendent or the principal of the school inwhich the pupil is enrolled determines that the pupil hasintentionally engaged in harassment, threats, or intimidation,directed against school district personnel or pupils, that issufficiently severe or pervasive to have the actual and reasonablyexpected effect of materially disrupting classwork, creatingsubstantial disorder, and invading the rights of either schoolpersonnel or pupils by creating an intimidating or hostileeducational environment.
507Harassment, Intimidation of a WitnessEC 48900(o) Harassed, threatened, or intimidated a pupil who isa complaining witness or a witness in a school disciplinaryproceeding for the purpose of either preventing that pupil frombeing a witness or retaliating against that pupil for being awitness, or both.
508Made Terrorist ThreatsEC 48900.7 - (a) In addition to the reasons specified inSections 48900, 48900.2, 48900.3, and 48900.4, a pupil may besuspended from school or recommended for expulsion if thesuperintendent or the principal of the school in which the pupil isenrolled determines that the pupil has made terroristic threatsagainst school officialsor school property, or both. (b) For thepurposes of this section, terroristic threat shall include anystatement, whether written or oral, by a person who willfullythreatens to commit a crime which will result in death, greatbodily injury to another person, or property damage in excess ofone thousand dollars ($1,000), with the specific intent that thestatement is to be taken as a threat, even if there is no intent ofactually carrying it out, which, on its face and under thecircumstances in which it is made, is so unequivocal,unconditional, immediate, and specific as to convey to the personthreatened, a gravity of purpose and an immediate prospect ofexecution of the threat, and thereby causes that person reasonablyto be in sustained fear for his or her own safety or for his or herimmediate family's safety, or for the protection of school districtproperty, or the personal property of the person threatened or hisor her immediate family.
509HazingEC 48900(q) Engaged in, or attempted to engage in, hazing asdefined in CA Education Code Section 32050
510Obscene Acts, Profanity, and VulgarityEC 48900(i) Committed an obscene act or engaged in habitualprofanity or vulgarity.
511Disruption, DefianceEC 48900(k) Disrupted school activities or otherwise willfullydefied the valid authority of supervisors, teachers,administrators, school officials, or other school personnel engagedin the performance of their duties.
512Property DamageEC 48900(f) Caused or attempted to cause damage to schoolproperty or private property.
513BullyingEC 48900 (r): Engaged in an act of bullying, including, but notlimited to,bullying committed by means of an electronic act, asdefined in subdivisions (f) and (g) of Section 32261, directedspecifically toward a pupil or school personnel.
600Robbery or ExtortionEC 48915(a)(1)(D) Robbery or extortion. 48900(e) Committed orattempted to commit robbery or extortion. Robbery orextortion.
601Property TheftEC 48900(g) Stolen or attempted to steal school property orprivate property.
602Received Stolen PropertyEC 48900(l) Knowingly received stolen school property orprivate property.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
1Formal Interdistrict Transfer AgreementThis is a formal agreement between two districts that approves a transfer from one district to another pursuant to Education Code Section 46600. This category does not include transfers that occur as a result of establishing residency in one of the following ways: 1) EC 48204b a parent or guardian requests that their child be transferred to a school district where the parent or legal guardian is physically employed; or 2) enrollment in a charter school outside the district of residence.
2Public School Choice - Program ImprovementThe Public School Choice transfer option must be offered to all students enrolled in Title I schools that have been identified for school improvement, corrective action, or restructuring. These students must be given the opportunity to transfer to another public school in the LEA that is not identified as a program improvement school.
3Unsafe School Choice OptionThis is a transfer where the student exercised the option to transfer from a school which the state has identified as persistently dangerous, or in which the student was a victim of violent crime on school property.
4District of Choice TransferThis is a transfer where the student transferred into the district pursuant to the district having deemed itself a District of Choice, pursuant to Education Code Section 48313.
5Disciplinary COE School Transfer"A student who transferred to a county office of education school (not a juvenile court school), including charter schools operating county programs, was transferred to that school for one or more of the following reasons:• Probation referral pursuant to Sections 300, 601, 602, and 654 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.• On probation or parole and not in attendance in a school other than the county office of education school.• Expelled for any of the reasons specified in subdivision (a) or (c) of Education Code Section 48915"
6Other Transfer"This is any other type of student transfer that may occur including, but not limited to:• Students voluntarily choosing to transfer to a county office of education school, who were not transferred due to any of the reasons specified in the ""Disciplinary COE School Transfer"" code.• Students who have established residency because their parents work in the area;• Special education students who are transferring to another school because it written into their Individualized Education Plan (IEP).• Students who are transferring to a charter school that is outside their district of residence"
CConversion OnlyThis code is used to convert data from SRRTS to CALPADS. These are values that were not collected in CSIS, but will be collected in CALPADS.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
AAdd-UpdateThe transaction type used to add or update information in CALPADS.
DDeleteThe transaction type used to delete information from CALPADS.
RReplaceThe transaction type used to replace information in CALPADS.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
10HandgunA firearm that can be used with one hand.
20Shotgun or RifleA firearm with a rifled bore, designed to be fired from the shoulder or a smoothbore gun that fires shot over short ranges
30Other FirearmAs defined in 18 USC 921, including any weapon (including a starter gun) which will or is designed to or may readily be converted to expel a projectile by the action of any explosive; the frame or receiver of handguns and rifles/shotguns; any firearm muffler or firearm silencer; any destructive device, which includes (a) any explosive, incendiary, or poison gas (1) bomb, (2) grenade, (3) rocket having a propellant charge of more than four ounces, (4) missile having an explosive or incendiary charge of more than one-quarter ounce, (5) mine, or (6) similar device; (b) any weapon which will, or which may be readily converted to, expel a projectile by the action of an explosive or other propellant, and which has any barrel with a bore of more than one-half inch in diameter; (c) any combination or parts either designed or intended for use in converting any device into any destructive device, and from which a destructive device may be readily assembled.
40Other WeaponIncludes any other weapon not included in codes 10- 30. This category should NOT be used for imitation firearms.
50Multiple Weapons with FirearmMore than one weapon, one or more of which was a firearm, was used by a single student during an Offense.
Valid Code ValueNameDefinition
01Testing March 4Testing March 4
02Testing April 29Testing April 29
03EAP EssayEAP Essay

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